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Publication numberUS1831971 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 17, 1931
Filing dateNov 8, 1930
Priority dateNov 8, 1930
Publication numberUS 1831971 A, US 1831971A, US-A-1831971, US1831971 A, US1831971A
InventorsCharles O Sandstrom
Original AssigneeCharles O Sandstrom
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Heat exchange apparatus
US 1831971 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Nov. 17, 1931. c. o. SANDSTROM HEAT EXCHANGE APPARATUS Filed Nov. 8, 1930 2 shets sheet 1 w. .w. .wHQ

R mm NM M Hwwwmmnwwwga Nov. 17, 1931. c. o. SANDSTROM HEAT EXCHANGE APPARATUS 2 Sheets-Shee 2 Filed NOV. 8, 1930 Patented Nov. 17, 1931 PATENT OFFICE CHARLES O. SANDSTROM, OF LOS ANGELES, CALIFORNIA HEAT EXCHANGE APPARATUS Application filed November 8, 1930. Serial No. 494,309.

This invention relates to a heat exchange apparatus or heat exchanger and relates par ticularly to a heat exchanger which is adapted for use involving small quantities of fluid.

] Heat exchangers now'on the market are relatively expensive and inefficient when they are built in sizes for handling only a relatively small quantity of fluid.

It is the general object of the present invention to provide a heat exchanger of suitable design for efiiciently securing transfer of heat in anexchanger embodying only a small number of tubes.

. It is a further object of the present invention to provide a heat exchanger which is compact and inexpensive in construction and which can be readily altered to change the number of passages of fluid through the exchanger so that the fluid may be caused to i r pass through all of the tubes in series or,when

it is desired, through a number of the tubes in parallel.

Various further objects and advantages of the present invention will be apparent from the description of a preferred form or example of heat exchanger embodying the invention. For this purpose, I have hereinafter described one form or example of a heat exchanger which embodies this invention, the description being given with reference to the accompanying drawings, in which Figure 1 is an elevation;

Figure 2 is an enlarged elevation mainly in section and with the center of the exchanger broken away to contract the view;

Figure 3 is a section on the line 33 of Figure 2 taken through the return cap at one end of the apparatus; a

Figure 4 is a section taken on the line t4 of Figure 2 through the return cap at the inlet and discharge end of the apparatus; Figure 5 is a sectionon the line55 of Figure 2 taken through ports in the baflles of the exchanger; and

Figure 6 is a perspective of the tube sheet 3. Referring to the drawings, the heat exchanger comprises a small tube sheet 2 at the inlet and discharge end of the, apparatus and a further tube sheet 3 at the other end of the apparatus.

A plurality of tubes is rolled into the tube plates or sheets 2 and 3 1n the usual manner so as to extend between the tube sheets and provide a plurality "of titions 14, 15 and 16, the partitions 13 and I 14 separating the cap into a chamber which j willpermitfluid to flowfrom the inlet 11 into only the tube 4. V V v V The partitions 14C and 15 provide a chamber for interconnecting the tubes 5 and 6. The partitions 15 and 16 provide a chamber for connecting the tubes 7 and 8 and the par titions 16 and 13 provide a chamber for connecting the tube 9 with the outlet 12;

In the opposite end of the exchanger there is provided an additional return cap 17 which is provided with partitions 18, 19 and 20 (see Fig. .3). The partitions 18 and 19 provide a chamber to interconnect tubes 4 and 5. The partitions 19 and 20'provide a chamber for inter-connecting tubes 6 and and partitions 18 and 20 provide a chamber for interconnecting tubes Sand 9. F

The caps are provided with stud bolts21 and 22 threaded to the tube sheets 2 and 3, respectively, by means of which the caps 10 and 17 are pressed against the tube sheets.

If desired, gaskets, such as indicated at 23 and 24, may be provided for forminga more fluid-tight joint. 1

The exchanger is also provided with a cylindrical shell 25 which at one end is preferably welded to a flange 26 which is bolted in place by bolts 27.passing through openings 27 in the tube sheet 3. The tube sheet "3 is shownas provided with an extending foot 28 which serves as a exchanger. 7

At the opposite end of the exchanger the shell 25 is welded to a supporting leg 29 and support for the is extended over the tube sheet 2 so as to be freely movably thereon in order to take care of expansion and contraction. This end of the shell is made fluid-tight by means of a stufling box provided with a gland 31.

Near one end of the exchanger are welded pipe nipples 32 and 33 which, respectively, provide for the inlet and outlet of the fluid which is to flow over the outside of the tubes 4 to 9 inclusive. In order to cause the fluid flowing over the tubes to .pass .along the tubes there is provided Within the shell a plurality of U-shape baflle members 34, 35, 36, 37, 3S and 39 (see Fig. These U-shape baflies are free to move with expansion and contraction of the tubes, while their edges bear firmly against the enclosing outer shell 25. Each of the U-shape bafiie members houses one .of the tubes and provides a compartment by which fluid may .flow along and outside of the tube for transferring heart to the fluid within the tube; the baffle 34 enclosing the tube 4; the bafile 35 enclosing the tube 5; the battle 36 enclosing the tube 6.; the balfle 37 enclosing the .tube 7.; the baffle .38 enclosing the tube 8, and the baffle .39 enclosing the tube 9.

Atthe ends of the baffles there are provided .p orts tor transferring the fluid from one U- shaped Ibafiie to the succeeding baflie. Thus, the ports 42 .and 43., respectively, at the rear end of the baffles, connect the baffles .34 and 35. The ports 44 and 45 connect the bailles V 3.6 and 41'? and the :ports 4.6 and 47 connect the ba'ifles 3.8 and 39. i

At the opposite end of the .bafiies there are provided additional ports for connecting in a similar manner the baflles '35 and .36 :and the bafiles .37 and 38 one with the other.

By using the arrangement thus described :the two fluids will flow through the-apparatus in the parallel direction. By using the inlet and outlet ports of the shell Ffor-t-he outlet .and inlet, respectively, the fluids may be caused to flow counter-currently.

As shown most clearly in Fig. 6., the tube sheet .3 has an enlarged disc portion 40 :and

a cylindrical hub ,portion 41, the :outer cylindrical wall of which has .a loose fit with the inner -.cylindrical wall of the shell 25. TU-s'haped recesses :are .cut in cylindrical hub 41 of the tube sheet .3 radially inwardly of such size as to fit the outer side walls of the U-shaped bafiles 34, 35, 36., .37., 38 and .39, which are shown in Fig. 5. Since the aforementioned vbafiles touch together, asshown in Fig. 5, the 'U-shaped ggroove out in .the tube sheet 3 intersects, leaving the substantially triangular portions 41. The tube sheet 2 is of construction 'to the tube sheet 3,

. except that the body or disc part of the tube sheet .is .cut off at the diameter :of the shell 25. 'The tube sheet 3 has the openings 4 .5, 6t, 7*, and .9 to receive :the tubes 4,15, 6, 7., .8 and :9, respectively.

--1nay be used as an open or atmospheric type in a cooling tower by removing the enclosing she'll and the 'U-shape baffles 34 to 39, in- .clusive.

'YVhile the particular form of exchanger herein described is well adapted .to carry out the objects of the present invention, it will be understood that various changes and modi ii cations may be made without departing from the spirit of the invention, and the invention is of the scope set forth in the appended claims.

I claim:

1. A heat exchanger comprising tube sheets, tubes extending between said tube sheets, caps at the ends of said tubes, a shell enclosing said tubes, .and a plurality of U- shape baflie members within said shell tor housing said tubes for providing fluid passages around said tubes.

2. A heat exchanger comprising a plurality of tubesarranged in ,a circular series, tube sheets at the end of said tubes, partitioned caps bolted to said tube sheets providing re turn chambers for interconnecting the tubes, .a shell surrounding said tubes and U-s'haped bafile members surrounding the individual tubes providing longitudinal passages for fluid around the tubes, said bafiies having ports for interconnecting the passages of the different 'baflies.

3. A heat exchanger comprising .a plurality of tubes, tube sheets at the ends of said tubes, caps providing return passages for the tubes, a shell enclosing said tubes, and U- .shape baflle members surrounding said tubes and engaging said shell to provide fluid passages .around said tubes, said tube sheets hav-- ing grooves slidably receiving .the'ends of said bafiies.

4. A heat exchanger comprising a single circular series of tubes, tube sheets at the-ends of said tubes, .a cylindrical shell rigid with a flange connected to the tube sheet at one end and having a slidable. connection with the tube sheet at the other end, and baflle means within said shell and surrounding said tubes for forming fluid passages around said tubes.

5. A heat exchanger comprising a single circular series of tubes, a tube sheet at each end of said tubes, a cap member at each end or the tubes bolted to said tube sheets, said cap members being provided with partitions forming interconnecting return passages for said tubes, a surrounding shell for said tubes, and baflle members formlng longitudinal passages around the tubes, said bafile members having means for inter-connecting said 1ongitudinal passages.

6. A heat exchanger comprising a circular series of tubes, tube sheets at the end of said tubes, caps secured to said tube sheets and having partitions forming return passages for said tubes, a shell surrounding said tubes, and baffles within said shell providing longitudinal fiuid passages along said tubes, said baflles having ports for interconnecting the baflie passages in such manner that the fluid flowing around the tubes may pass counter-currently to the fluid within the tubes.

7. A heat exchanger comprising a plurality of tubes, tube sheets receiving the ends of said tubes, caps pressed against said tube sheets and having partitions forming return passages for said tubes, a shell surrounding said tubes, and U-shape bafile members extending longitudinal of the tubes and providing individual longitudinal passages for fluid outside of the tubes.

Signed at Los Angeles, California this 24th day of October, 1930.

CHARLES O. SANDSTROM.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4395618 *Mar 3, 1980Jul 26, 1983Emerson Electric Co.Electric circulation heater for heating fluids such as oil
US5004042 *Oct 2, 1989Apr 2, 1991Brunswick CorporationClosed loop cooling for a marine engine
US9014548 *Feb 27, 2013Apr 21, 2015Halla Visteon Climate Control CorporationCooling-water heating type heater
US20130223825 *Feb 27, 2013Aug 29, 2013Halla Climate Control Corp.Cooling-water heating type heater
EP0671596A1 *Oct 19, 1994Sep 13, 1995Deutsche Babcock-Borsig AktiengesellschaftHeat exchanger for cooling of hot reaction gas
Classifications
U.S. Classification165/160, 165/DIG.408, 165/158
International ClassificationF28D7/10, F28F9/22, F28F9/02
Cooperative ClassificationY10S165/408, F28F9/02, F28F9/22, F28D7/10
European ClassificationF28D7/10, F28F9/02, F28F9/22