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Publication numberUS1832214 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 17, 1931
Filing dateJun 23, 1928
Priority dateJun 23, 1928
Publication numberUS 1832214 A, US 1832214A, US-A-1832214, US1832214 A, US1832214A
InventorsClella Jenkins
Original AssigneeClella Jenkins
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Pocket in garments
US 1832214 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

c. JENKINS 1,832,214

POCKET IN GARMENT Filed June '23. 1928 2 Sheets-Sheet l ll 1 Z T 1 CLELLA dawn/v5 ww7i/ cifiw |llllllIIIHIIHIIIUHHHHHHHTHINIHIHUHHII HIHIIHIlllHlHlIlllllllHllllllHlH]Hlllllllllllll llllllllllllllllllllll IllHHUHlllllllllllllllIHlHlIHIHIHIHIHIIIIIIIHIII Nov. 17, 1931.

Nov.17,1931. a i

POCKET IN GARMENT 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed June 23, 1928 6 8 C2 :1. z. A JENKINS, i 636% Patented Nov. 17, 1931 UNITED STATES CLELLA Jnnxms, on

MOBEZRLY, MISSOURI POCKET IN GARMENTS Application filed June 23,

This invention pertains to garments, and more particularly to the construction of pockets for the same.

One of the objects of this invention is to provide a pocket of novel construction adapted to improve the appearance of the garment.

Another object is to provide a pocket construction whereby a pocket of greater strength 1% and durability may be obtained.

Another object is to provide a construction in which the pocket may be reinforced in a simple and eii'ective manner.

Another object is to provide a method for constructing a pocket of this type, which is simple and may be rapidly and conveniently carried out.

Further objects will appear from the following description, taken in connection with the accompanying drawings, in which Figures 1,2 and 3 illustrate successive steps in the construction of a pocket in accordance with this invention;

Figures 4, 5 and 6 illustrate steps in the construction of another embodiment of this invention;

Figures 7 and 8 illustrate steps in the construction of still other embodiments of this invention; and

Figures 9 and 10 illustrate difierent shapes of pocket openings made in accordance with this invention.

Figure 11 is a view showing another embodiment of this invention.

In accordance with this invention, a pocket having an opening of substantial width is provided. This opening may then be covered or closed by a welt formed of the same material as the garment, or of other material, in order to provide a decorative efiect.

Referring to the drawings, Figure 1 illustrates the first step in the construction of the pocket. The garment material 1 has stitched to the outside thereof a strip 2 of material from which the pouch portion of the pocket is to be made. The material 2 may be placed with its right side against the outside of the garment material 1 and then stitched thereto by a line of stitching 3 surrounding the pocket 50 opening. The pocket opening is made of sub- 1928. Serial No. 287,725.

stantial width so as to provide for a substantial width of welt to be formed later and in order to improve the decorative eflect. The line of stitching 3' passes entirely around the pocket opening. When the stitching 3 has i been applied, the material within the stitching is cut or slit, as illustrated in Figure 1, the main slit extending lengthwise along the middle of the pocketopening with mitering cuts at the corners. These slits extend through both layers of material.

The pouch material 2 is then passed through the pocket opening, formed as just described, from the outside to the inside of the garment. This operation is illustrated in Figure 2. The entire strip 2 is passed through the pocket opening and straightened out on the inside of the garment, as illustrated in Figure 3, which shows the inside of the garment material after the strip 2 has beenpassed through to the reverse side and straightened out. The slitting of the material within the pocket opening produces tabs l and 5 along the sides and ends, respectively,

of the pocket opening. During the reversing operation these tabs are turned to the inside of the garment and take position between the garment material and the pouch material, as illustrated in dotted lines in Figure 3.

A simple pocket may now be formed by folding downwardly the upper flap of the strip 2 from the position shown in Figure 3, so as to place said flap upon the lower flap of the same material below the pocket opening. The two flaps may then be stitched together around their edges to form the pouch portion of the pocket. In this case, the upper flap of the pouch material will show through the pocket opening on the outside of the garment; and if a material of suitable design is used for the pouch portion, a decorative effect may be obtained thereby.

A pocket of attractive design is produced by placing a fold 6 of the lower flap of the pouch material over the pocket opening, as illustrated in Figure 4:. This fold is then stitched by a line oi stitching 7 As shown in Figure l, this line of stitching runs around three sides of the welt 8 formed by folding up this lower flap of the pouch material.

The line of stitching 7 may include only the folded welt 8 or the stitches may also pass through the garment material so as to secure the welt thereto at its edges. If desired, a line of stitching may also be passed along the top edge 9 of the welt. This is desirable wherethe welt is made of heavy material,

The pouch portion of the pocket may now be formed by folding down the upper flap of the pouch material as described in connection with Figure 3, and stitching the flaps together around the lower edge. With some material an improved appearance is obtained by first folding a narrow portion of the upper flap of the pouch material upwardly from the pocket opening, as illustrated at 10, Figure 5, and stitching this fold together or to the garment'material before stitching the two flaps together to form a pouch. This secures the pouch material tothe garment material above the pocket opening by an extra line of stitching, which assists in supporting the pouch portion.

The appearance of the finished pocket from the outside of the garment is shown in Figure 6. In this case the welt 8 is made of different material from the garment and shows through the pocket opening. A variety of decorative effects may be obtained by the use of materials of appropriate design for the welt portion 8. I V In the case where it is desired to make the welt portion of decorative material which is expensive, economy may be practised by forming the pouch strip 2 of two pieces of different material, as illustrated in Figure 7,

the lower flap being made of the material intended for the welt and the upper flap being made of the garment material or other material suitable for the purpose. These are stitched to the right side of the garment material as described for Figure 1. pieces may be sewed together, or simply placed in abutment at their adjoining edges 11. The same method of constructing the pocket may be followed out. This device also enables one to use small scraps of material for making the pouch.

In cases where thewelt material is light or flimsy, or in case of pockets which receive excessive wear, such as vest pockets andthe like, the welt 8 may be reinforced by placing therewithin, when the material is folded to form the welt, a strip of reinforcing material 12, asshown in Figure 8. The reinforcing material may be stitched to the welt material. in any suitable manner and serves to stiffen the welt; otherwise, the pocket is constructed in the same manner as previously described,

Figures 9 and 10 illustrates different shapes ofpocket openings to which this invention may be applied and indicate the variety of decorative efiects which may be obtained with pockets embodying this invention.

The two In cases where the welt material is expensive, a cheaper material may be combined therewith to form the pouch as illustrated in Figure 11. In this case the welt and the inside flap of the pouch may be made of the welt material 14 and a piece of other material 15 may be stitched to the turned-back portion ofthe Weltas shown at 16. This piece then forms the flap of the pouch.

It will be seen that this invention provides a simple and rapid method for constructing a pocket and provides a pocket of novel design and of increased utility. It will be noted that the pocket opening is protected by a welt at that point at which the maximum wear comes upon a pocket. The pocket is so formed that the welt portion, or, in fact, the entire pocket, may be renewed in a simple and convenient manner. A great variety of different materials may be used for the welt 5 It is, therefore, to be understood that this invention is not to belimited to the specific details shown and/or described.

IIaving thus described the invention, what is claimed is: I

1. In a'garment having a pocket opening of substantial width, a pocket having a pouch portion formed of a strip of material stitched to the right side of the garment material around said opening and turned inwardly thru said opening to form an invisible seam therearound, a part of said pouch portion being folded vupto provide a welt extending across said opening and exposed therethru.

2. In a garment having a pocket opening of substantial width, a pocket having .apouch portion formed of a strip ofimaterial stitched to the right side of the garment material around said opening and turned inwardly thru said opening to form an invisible seam therearound, a part of said pouch portion being folded up to provide a welt extending across said opening and exposed therethru, and means for reinforcing said welt.

3. In a arment having a pocket opening of substantial width, apoclret having a pouch portion formed of a strip of material stitched to the right side of the garment material around' said openi ng' and turned inwardly thru said opening to form an invisible seam therearound, a part of said pouch portion be 4:. In the art of makin pockets in garments, the method comprising, stitching to the outside of the garment material a strip of pouch material by a line of stitching surrounding a pocket opening of substantial width, cutting the material within the pocket opening, turning the pouch material to the inside of the garment thru said opening, folding a portion of the turned material to pro- 10 Vide a Welt extending across said opening and exposed therethru, and forming the pouch on the inside of the garment.

5. In the art of making pockets in garments, the method comprising, stitching to 15 the outside of the garment material a strip of pouch material and another material by a line ofstitching surrounding a pocket opening of substantial width, cutting the material within the pocket opening, turning the 29 pouch material to the inside of the garment thru said opening and folding the same back at the lines of stitching to form a wide opening, folding a portion of the pouch material and said other material to form a welt exea tending across said opening and exposed therethru, and forming the pouch on the inside of the garment.

6. A garment having an opening of substantial width, a concealed pocket attached to the garment to lie against the inside thereof, said pocket having a welt extending upwardly from the bottom of and laterally across said opening to be exposed therethrough, said welt being free of the top edge 35 of said opening.

7. A garment having an opening of substantial width, a concealed pocket attached to the garment to lie against the inside thereof, said pocket having a welt attached to the garment along the bottom edge of said opening and extending upwardly and laterally across said opening to be exposed therethrough, said welt being free of the top edge of said opening.

In testimony whereof I affix my signature this 14th day of June, 1928.

CLELLA JENKINS.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2524879 *Feb 21, 1949Oct 10, 1950Crescenzo CapuanoHip pocket
US3105973 *Oct 29, 1959Oct 8, 1963Pfaff Ag G MMethod of making piped openings for pockets or the like
US4263678 *Oct 2, 1978Apr 28, 1981Haggar CompanyPocket construction
US4321710 *Apr 7, 1980Mar 30, 1982Haggar CompanyPocket construction
US4349920 *Jul 14, 1980Sep 21, 1982Haggar CompanyPocket construction
US5027729 *Oct 7, 1988Jul 2, 1991Cimcorp OyMethod of manufacturing a pocket construction provided with a welt
WO1989003184A1 *Oct 7, 1988Apr 20, 1989Cimcorp OyMethod of manufacturing a pocket construction provided with a welt
Classifications
U.S. Classification2/247
International ClassificationA41D27/20
Cooperative ClassificationA41D27/20
European ClassificationA41D27/20