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Publication numberUS1832919 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 24, 1931
Filing dateJan 31, 1929
Priority dateJan 31, 1929
Publication numberUS 1832919 A, US 1832919A, US-A-1832919, US1832919 A, US1832919A
InventorsTaylor James F
Original AssigneeFrigidaire Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Refrigerating apparatus
US 1832919 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
Previous page
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

NOV. 24, 1931. J TAYLOR 1,832,919

REFRI GERATING APPARATUS Filed Jan. 31, 1929 a Sheets-Sheet 1 2 F v ,3 J43 Nov. 24, 1931. J. F. TAYLOR Y REFRIGERATING APPARATUS 5 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed Jan. 31, 1929 mxwwwwwwmwwwmwwww \5 [7+ m. L m io 6 J 1931- J F. TAYLOR REFRIGERATING APPARATUS Filed Jan. 51, 1929 3 Sheets-Sheet, 3

o, v m I 11/11,, 1'', VIIIIII'IIIIIIIIIIIIIII Patented Nov. 24, 1931 UNITED STATES PATENT- OFFICE JAMES F. TAYLOR, OF DAYTON, OHIO, ASSIGNOR TO FRIGIDAIRE CORPORATION, OF

DAYTON, OHIO, A CORPORATION OF DELAWARE REFRIGERATING APPARATUS Application filed January 31, 1929. Serial No. 336,433.

This invention relates to refrigerating apparatus and more particularly to a refrigerator cabinet adapted to receive part or all of a mechanical refrigerating system.

An object of this invention is to provide a cabinet adapted to be made of sheet metal without the aid of a separate framework.

Another object of this invention is to provide a cabinet which may be made at a reduced cost.

Further objects and advantages of the present invention will be apparent from the following description, reference being had to the accompanying drawings, wherein a preferred form of the present invention is clearly shown.

In the drawings:

Fig. 1 is a front view in elevation of a cabinet embodying features of this invention;

Fig. 2 is a horizontal cross-sectional view taken along the line 22 of Fig. 1;

Fig. 3 is a vertical cross-sectional view taken along the line 3-3 of Fig. 2;

Fig. 4 is an enlargement of a portion of 26 Fig. 2;

Fig. 5 is a cross-sectional view taken along the line 5-5 of Fig. 3;

Fig. 6 is a view similar to Fig. 4 of a slightly modified form of this invention;

Fig; 7 is a horizontal cross-sectional view taken along the line 7-7 of Fig. 3;

Fig. 8 is a vertical cross-sectional view taken along the line 88 of Fig. 7 and Fig. 9 is a side elevation of a panel which may be used'in the construction of a cabinet embodying features of this invention.

A refrigerator cabinet embodying features of this invention may comprise, in general, a food compartment lining 20, having insulation 21 around said lining, and an outer casing generally designated as 22. If desired, the cabinet may also include a machinery compartment generally designated as 23. The food compartment lining is adapted to receive a cooling unit of a mechanical refrigerating system, such as the well-known evaporator. The remainder of the mechanical refrigerating system may be installed in any convenient place, and, if desired, it may be installed in the machinery compartment.

In the construction of this cabinet, the boxlike lining 20 maybe provided with a slight offset 25 in order to provide reinforcement along the edge 26 around a door opening. A non-conducting door jamb 27 preferably made of wood, may be secured to the lining 20, preferably by nailing the edge 26 to the door jamb. The outer casing 22 may be assembled and preferablysecured to the door jamb 27, either before or after the insulation 21 has been assembled in the cabinet or on the lining. One method of assembling the cabinet may be by cementing the insulation 21 to the lining before the outer casing is secured in place. This may be accomplished by providing slabs of insulation 28, which may be rock-cork or corkboard. These slabs may be cemented to the lining 20 with bituminous cement applied in a molten condition either to the outside of the lining, or to the slabs of insulation, or to both, and the parts brought together when part or all of the cement is still in a molten or plastic condition. If desired, after all of the slabs 28 have been cemented to the lining 20, the outside surfaces of the insulation may be rendered airtight by a suitable cover. A suitable cover may be provided by placing a hermetic coat of bituminous cement to the outside surface of the slabs 28. As shown in Fig. 4 a portion of the bituminous cement 29 is slightly thicker than the remainder of the cement where the oflset25 occurs.

After the insulation and the door j amb have been secured to the lining, the outer casing may be assembled on the cabinet. The outer casing may comprise one or more sheet metal panels with at least one right angled bend in the panel and with a metal strip within the bend in order'to reinforce the same. Thus, in the form shown in Fig. 2, a panel 30 may be provided with one or more right angled bends 31 and 32. These bends may be provided with reinforcing metal strips 33 and 34 respectively. If these strips are to be integral withthe panel, the panel maybe further bent at 35 and 36 in order to produce the strips 33 and'34. If desired, the edges of the strips 37 and 38 and the strips 33 and 34 may be secured to the panel 30, preferably by soldering or welding the same. If desired, the strips 33 or 34 may be provided with longitudinal bends 39 intermediate the edges of the strip in order to provide straight portions 40 which lie parallel to and against portions of the panel 30. The panel 41 may be similar to the panel 30. These panels may be secured to the door jamb 27 by providing notches 42 between the top and bottom of the door jamb and by securing the strips 33 to the door jamb by means of a bolt 43. These bolts are accessible from the top and bottom of the cabinet since they need be spaced only a-slight distance from the top of the cabinet or from the bottom of the door jamb. Any other suitable means of securing the panels to the door jamb may be used. If desired, finishing strips may be placed within the door jamb in order to give a finished appearance to the cabinet.

In the modification shown in Fig. 6, the strip 33a need not be integral with the panel 30. The separate strip 33a may be provided with longitudinal bends 39a to provide portions 40a parallel to and touching the panel 30a. The portions 4011 may be secured to the panel 30a by any suitable means such as by soldering or welding or by spot-welding. In this modification the other parts of the cabinet may be substantially the same as the modification shown in Figs. 2 and 4.

A cabinet may be provided with one or more horizontal panels or lateral reinforcing members. Thus a top 50 may comprise a sheet metal member with a downwardly directed flange 51 adapted to be in engagement with the panel or panels of the cabinet. This engagement tends to give the cabinet lateral reinforcement and to prevent the same from wobbling in that direction. Also. if desired, a bottom lateral reinforcing member may be provided. Thus a sheet metal panel 52 may be provided with reinforcement along the edges, such as by a right angled bend 53 and a sheet metal strip 54 somewhat similar to the construction shown for the panel 30 and which may extend continuously around the panel 52 except at the corners. This panel or reinforcing member may be placed in engagement with, and spot-welded to, the side panel or panels of the cabinet in order to provide reinforcement and for preventing the cabinet from wobbling in that direction. If desired, another panel may be provided to form the roof of the machinery compartment. Thus the panel may be reinforced along he edges, for instance in the same manner as panel 52. Also, if desired, transverse reinforcement may be provided by small channel-like depressions 56 pressed in the panel 26. Supports 57 may be attached to the side panels, and if desired these supports may be shelflike in character and may be secured by rivets or spot-welds to the side panels. The downwardly directed flange of the panel is adapted to rest in the support 57 and to be secured thereto, for instance by screws 58. The panel 55 is adapted to be in engagement with these supports 57 and also may be supported by the lower flange 59 in a transverse front panel 60 placed immediatelyunderneath the door opening of the lining.

The panel 60 is adapted to cover the lower horizontal member of the door jamb 27. The panel 60 is also adapted to extend from the edge of the panel 30 to the edge of the panel 41 as shown in Fig. 1. Similar panels 61 and 62 may be provided, respectively, at the bottom of the machinery compartment 23 and above the door 63 of the food compartment lining 20. If desired, a machinery compartment door 64 may also be provided and this may be hinged over the flange 65 of the panel 61 merely by providing hooklike structures 66 on the door 64. A spring catch 67 may engage with the flange 59 of the panel 60 in order to hold the door 64 in place.

Casters 7 0 may be provided. These may be secured to the cabinet in any suitable manner. For instance the panel 52 may have the corner 71 bent upwardly vertically where the flange 54 terminates in order to accommodate the reinforcing strips of the side panels. A plate 72 may be Welded underneath the panel 52 and a suitable opening 73 may then be provided for reception of the caster structure.

The rear panel 74 may be a sheet of metal and may be secured to the rear flanges 75 of the panels 30 and 41, for instance by screws 76.

In assembling the outer casing of the cabinet, the side panels and the rear panels may be secured together along with the panels 52 and 55. Thereafter the lining, together with the insulation and door jamb, may be lowered or inserted through the top into the cabinet, and the same may be secured to the outer panel by any suitable means, such as bolts 43. The remaining parts of the cabinet may be thereafter put in place.

It is obvious that instead of the bolts 4 any other suitable means may be used to secure the door jamb to the outer casing. For instance in Fig. 6, the bolts 43 may be omitted and the screws 43a might be used instead. In Fig. 4, instead of the bolts'43, screws might be driven through the panel 30 either from the front of the cabinet or from the side of the cabinet into the door While the form of embodiment of the invention as herein disclosed, constitutes a preferred form, it is to be understood that other forms might be adopted, all coming within the scope of the claims which follow.

What is claimed is as follows:

1; A refrigerator cabinet comprising a food compartment lining having a door opening, insulation around said lining, an outer casing around said insulation, said casing inclu ing at least one sheet metal panel with a right angled bend, and a metal strip within said bendsecured to said panel.

2. A refrigerator cabinet comprising a food compartment lining having a door opening, insulation around said lining, an outer casing around said insulation, said casing including at least one sheet metal panel with a right angled bend, said panel being bent back upon itself at said right angle bend to form a post.

3. A refrigerator cabinet comprising a food compartment lining having a door opening, insulation around said lining, an outer casing around said insulation, said casing including a panel structure comprising at least one sheet metal panel with a right angled bend, a metal strip within said bend secured to said panel, said panel structure extending below the insulation of said lining to form a machinery compartment, supports secured to said panel structure, and a plate with reinforced edges forming the roof of said ma- .chinery compartment carried by said supports.

4. A refrigerator cabinet comprising a food compartment lining having a door opening, insulation around said 1ining, an outer casing around said insulation, said casing including a panel structure comprising at least one sheet metal panel with a right angled bend, a metal strip within said bend secured to said panel, and a bottom lateral reinforcing member in engagement with said panel structure.

5. A refrigerator cabinet comprising a food compartment lining having a door opening, insulation around said lining, an outer casing around said insulation, said casing including a plurality-of sheet metal panels each with a right angled bend, and a metal strip within said bend integral with said panel.

refrigerating cabinet comprising a food compartment lining having a door open- I ing, insulation around said lining, an outer casing around said insulation, said casing including a plurallty of sheet metal panels each with a right angled bend, a metal strip within said bend integral with said panel, said panels extending beyond said food compartment to form a machinery compartment, a flanged top in engagement with said panels to impart rigidity to said cabinet, an intermediate plate in engagement with said panels and forming a horizontal wall for said machinery compartment and a bottom lateral reinforcing member in engagement with said panels.

7. A refrigerator cabinet com rising a food compartment lining having a 001' opening, insulation around said lining, an outer casing around said insulation, said casing including a panel structure comprising at east one sheet metal panel with, a right angled bend, a metal strip within said bend secured to said panel, said panel structure extending below the insulation of said lining to form a machinery compartment, supports secured to said panel structure, and a plate forming the roof of said machinery compartment carried by said supports.

In testimony whereof I hereto afiix my sig nature.

JAMES F. TAYLOR.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2869751 *Sep 3, 1954Jan 20, 1959Pfauder Permutit IncInsulated storage tank and method of making a storage tank
US5033636 *Jan 18, 1991Jul 23, 1991General Electric CompanyRefrigerator cabinet liner having non-crinkled corners
Classifications
U.S. Classification220/592.9
International ClassificationF25D23/06
Cooperative ClassificationF25D23/065
European ClassificationF25D23/06C