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Publication numberUS1833732 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 24, 1931
Filing dateApr 19, 1928
Priority dateJan 27, 1927
Publication numberUS 1833732 A, US 1833732A, US-A-1833732, US1833732 A, US1833732A
InventorsBarrows Stanley H
Original AssigneeCalifornia Chemical Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Carpet tacking strip
US 1833732 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Nov. 24, 1931.

S. H. BARROWS CARPETv TACKING STRIP Orgnal Filed Jan. 27, 1927 INVENTOR. 'S-Q wieg #5a/rom Patented Nov. 24, 1931 UNITED STAT-ES PATENT oFFics STANLEYH. BABBOWS, OF CHICAGO, ILLINOIS, LASSIGNOR T0 CALIFORNIA CBEHIGAL CORPORATION, 0F IPOBTEBVILLE, GALIFOBQNIL; A. ACOI{IE.OBA.TI[0.N 'OF ILLINOIS CARPET TACKING STRIP Original application led January 27, 1827, Serial 170,168,915. Divided and this application flied April 19, 1928. Serial 17o. 271,171.

When it is desired to use a carpet or the like over a cement or stone fioor, etc., a fundamental difiiculty has been presented in the lack of any surface suitable to tack to, and floor coverings have been used under such conditions without satisfactory fastening. -An adequate provision for such a situaion generally is accordingly highly desira le.

To the accomplishment Iof the foregoing and related ends, the invention, then, consists of the features hereinafter fully described, and articularly pointed out in the claims, the ollowingr description and the annexed drawings setting forth in detail but a few of the various ways in which the principle of the invention may be employed.

In said annexed drawings Fig. 1 represents a. sectional detail of one embodiment of the invention; and Fig. 2 is l 'a similar view of a modified construction.

or by mold pieces placed for the Referring vmore particularl to the drawings, there is shown an un er support or under flooring l1 of non-wooden character, for instance of concrete or fireproof slab construction, and in relation with a wall 2. Upon such non-wooden support, there is a nail-penetrable element or strip 3, being secured to the under support by cementitious adhesion.

While, in some instances such nail-penetrable strip may consists of wood, more advantageously it may be of a cementitious composition, suitably nail-penetrable by the inclusion of proper filling constituents. Such cementitious composition strip may be preformed and then be secured in lace by cement c, but preferably I form t e strip directly in place by casting ormolding the cementitious composition, as by trowe ling purpose. As a preferred composition,` an o -salt cementgsuchV as an Oxy-sulphate or tter an Oxy-chloride with a filler including cellulosic material, may be employed.` Magnesium Oxy-chloride cement with sawdust, shavings,

' rice hulls,;straw or 'the like, to which can also be added varying ercentages of sand, crushed stone, infusoria earth, cinders/etc'., is most advantageous, such composition providing' a more tenacious adhesion than bituminous compositions ory other cementing agents. The Oxy-cements, and more especiall Oxy-chloride, give a remarkably firm bon upon wood, cellulosicmaterials, and artificial or natural stone surfaces, and such elements may be satisfactorily held to each other to withstand stresses, such that the element may be sheared within itself before the bond at the surface breaks. With the cement finally set, filler pads, felts or the like 4 may bespread on the fioor' 1",'within thev nailing stri 3, and the carpet 5 may then be secured y means of tacks 6 driven into the nailing stri 3. l

A further advantage where a nail-penetrable element, that is, penetrable to nails, tacks, etc., is secured by a cementitious material including an Oxy-salt, lies in the fact that magnesium Oxy-sulphate, or better, oxychloride, affords an antiseptic or preserva-l tive function in addition to its cementitious utility. K

vA nailing or tacking strip 3a, (Fig. 2)

may be provided as suggested, bein held firmly in place by the cementitious a esion to the under structure 1, and after it is rm, a top coating 7 of cement or artificial stone composition is spread in place von the main fioor area adjacent, thereby raising the level to the vextent desired. The carpet 5 may be laid as usual and tacked to the strip 3a for instance by tacks 6.

It will thus be seen that a carpet, including also linoleum or any preferred floor covering material, may thus be as readily secured in place as on awooden fioor, and while the nailing strip may be of wood, cemented to the concrete underfiooring preferably by oxychloride cementitious composition, it will more desirably ordinarily beofacomposition body, the composition .comprising an Oxy-cement binder and a filler including cellulosic material, and most desirably it ma be cast directly in place, thus providing a advantages of necessary shaping and levelling and adapting to the requirements of any particular location.

This application is a division of my applifl catipm'Serial No. 163,915, filed January 27, 192

Other vmodes of applying the principle of the invention may be employed, change being made as regards the details disclosed, provided the means or steps stated in any of the following claims, or the equivalent of such be used.

I therefore particularly point out and distinctly claim as my inventlon L In building construction, the combination of under flooring essentially impenetrable to ordinary nails, and means for securing a carpet in place, said means comprising a nail penetrable strip at carpet receiving level of a composition made up of magnesium oxychloride and a filler including cellulosic material, the strip being cementitiously adherent to the under flooring. n 2. In building construction, the combination of under flooring essentially impenetrable to ordinary nails, and means for securing a carpet in place, said means comprising a nail penetrable strip at carpet receiving level of a molded composition, the strip being cementitiously adherent to the under flooring.

3. In building construction, the combination of under flooring essentially impenetrable to Ordinar nails, and means for securing a carpet in p ace, said means comprising a nail penetrable strip at carpet receiving level of amolded cementitious composition, said strip being cementitiously adherent to said under-floorin 4. In buildlng construction, the combination of under flooring essentially impenetrable to Ordinar nails, and means for securing a carpet in p ace, said means comprising a nail penetrable strip at carpet receiving level of a molded cementitious composition held to ysaid under flooring by cement.

5. In building construction, under-flooring of material essentially impenetrable or ordinary' nails, a carpet-tacking strip at carpetreceiving level onv saidunder-iooring, and

lmeans for holding said strip to said underflooring, said means consisting of a magnesia composition cement.

6. In combination with a floor and a building Well, a composition nailing strip cementitiously adhered to said floor and sealing the i junction crevice between said'ioor and wall, the top surface of said strip being beveled along that margin spaced from the Wall.

Signed by me this I1th day of April, 1928.

STANLEY H. BARROWS.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US6385923Feb 19, 1997May 14, 2002Duramax, Inc.Transition support for flooring material
US7174682Mar 19, 2002Feb 13, 2007Johnsonite Inc.Transition support for flooring material
Classifications
U.S. Classification52/273, 52/612, 52/368, 16/16, 52/366
International ClassificationA47G27/00, A47G27/04
Cooperative ClassificationA47G27/0462
European ClassificationA47G27/04C2T