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Publication numberUS1837225 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 22, 1931
Filing dateAug 1, 1930
Priority dateAug 1, 1930
Publication numberUS 1837225 A, US 1837225A, US-A-1837225, US1837225 A, US1837225A
InventorsPaul Lipski
Original AssigneeContinental Oil Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Oil advertising device
US 1837225 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Dec. 22, 1931. 1 LIPSKI 1,837,225

OIL ADVERTISING DEVICE Filed Aug. 1, 1950 3 Sheets-Sheet l &

J'NVENTOR. Pad/1412M? A TTOR'NEY.

Dec. 22, 1931. P. Ll PSK! OIL ADVERTISING DEVICE Filed Aug. 1, 1930 3 Sheets-Sheet 2 INVENTOR Pa /1405A? @0 M M w w j Dec. 22, 1931. P. LIPSKI OIL ADVERTISING DEVICE Filed Aug. 1, 1950 3 Sheets-Sheet 3 INVENTOR fiou/l/ps/f/ BY f 5f ATTORNEY N a s? Patented Dec. 22, 1931' STATES PATENT OFFICE PAUL LIISKI, OF PONCA CITY, OKLAHOMA, ASSIGNOR TO CONTINENTAL OIL COMPANY, OF PONCA CITY, OKLAHOMA, A CORPORATION OF DELAWARE OIL ADVERTISING DEVICE Application filed August 1, 1930. Serial No. 472,341.

This invention relates to improvements in oil advertising devices and is particularly adapted for advertising lubricating oil. The

, invention consists, briefly, in circulating a e stream of oil continuously in a cyclic flow, spreading the oil in a thin film before a light source, and manipulating the film to disclose the attraction of the particles in the film for each other besides creating attractive in color efiects by the manipulation of the film to the light source.

Fig. 1 is a diagrammatic front view of the device.

. Fig. 2 is a rear View showing the interior mechanism.

Fig. 3 is an enlarged detail of the operat ing mechanism.

Fig. 4 is a view taken along the line 4-4 .in Fig. 2.

Fig. 5 is aview taken along the line 5-5 in Fig. 3. V Fig. 6 is a view taken along the line 6-6 in Fig. 4.

Fig. 7 is a broken perspective view to show the operation of the mechanism for moving the film spirally. I

Fig. 8 is an enlarged detail of the worm and gear mechanism.

Referring to the drawings, in Fig. 1 is shown a cabinet 1, having a front glass door 2 and a top portion 3, upon which any suitable type of design may be placed, or identifying insignia of the company which is using the device. Within the cabinet is a lower can a container 4, and an upper can or container 5, connected by tubing 6 to a pump hereinafter mentioned. In front of the upper can is a slotted opening 7 which is equipped with a lip or weir 8. At the sides of this weir are attached wires 9. These wires, at their lower extremities, are attached to a cross bar 10, shown in Fig. 7 The mechanism is driven from a source of power, preferably an electric motor designated as 11 and shown in Figs. 4 and 6. This motor, through friction drive wheels 12, 13, and 14, drives a worm 15, mounted upon the same shaft as the friction drive wheel 14 and shown in Fig. 8. The worm meshes with the worm gear 16, mounted upon a cross shaft 17 Also mounted upon the shaft 17 is a cam 18 (see Fig. 5) which, in its rotation, contacts with a lever or bar 19 (see Figs. 5 and 7 At the end of the lever 19 is a tenslon spring 20 which holds the lever 19 in contact with the cam. A second cam 21 is mounted on the outer end of the shaft 17 This cam has attached thereto. electric con nections shown diagrammatically at 22 which light periodically the light bulbs23 positioned behind a translucent or semi-. transparent glass screen 24, positioned in front of the lights and behind the film as shown in Fig. 4. V

The lever 19 is pivoted at 25 and terminates in a yoke or bifurcated :end designated as 26 (see Fig. 7). This bifurcated end portion is pinned to a sleeve 27 which is positioned beneath the cross bar 10 but is not attached thereto. The sleeve 27 is internally bored 7 but not threaded to accommodate the'screw' 28.. It does not rotate upon the threads of the screw. The spiral screw 28 extends through a threaded hole in the cross bar 10 so that vertical movement of the sleeve 27 raising and lowering the cross bar 10 will simultaneously give it a spiral movement upon the threaded bolt or screw 28. This screw is rigidly attached'to a cross piece 29. v In a lowered position, the cross bar 10 rests substantially on the top rim of the container 4'. Due to the action of the cam 18 upon the pivoted lever 19, the cross bar is raised and lowered and simultaneously rotated spirally I due to the action of the spiral screw 28.

Driven by the same shaft upon which is mounted the friction wheel 13 is a pump 30, shown .in Fig. 6. This pump draws its suction from the lower container 4 through the pipe 31, shown in Fig. 4, regulated by a valve 32, and discharges the liquid through the flexible tubing 6 into the top container 5 as shown in Fig. 4. r

In operation a liquid level, substantially that shown in Fig. 4 is maintained both in the upper and lower containers. The liquid overflows the weir and is spread by means of the curved surface 8 so that the film is confined at its lateral edges between the wires. 9 flowing into the lower container. The motor, l00

through the friction drive, oscillates the le ver 19 which in turn gives the cross bar 10 a vertical reciprocating movement and, at the same time, spiral movement.

Simultaneously with the spreading of the wires 9, which in turn spreads the film, and with the rotative movement of the film, there is a variegated lighting eil'ect produced by the periodic illumination or successive illumination o"? the light bulbs 23. It will be appreciated that innumerable lighting effects can be produced by control of the circuit and by different colors the lighting of the film may be changed in any desired manner. The device, while it is particularly adapted for use with lubricating oils, may be used with any type of liquid having suificient molecular adhesion or inherently capable of maintaining a film between two limiting wires.

scope of the invention.

I claim as my invention:

1. An oil display device of the character described comprising means for creating a cyclic movement of an oil stream. a mechanism interposed in the course of the oil for spreading the oil into thin film, a light source positioned behind the film for illuminating the film, and means for periodically spreading and narrowing the film.

2. An oil display device of the character described comprising means for creating a cyclic movement of an oil stream, a mechanism interposed in the course of the oil for spreading the oil into a thin film, a light source positioned behind the film for illuminating the film, means for periodically spreading and narrowing the film and simultaneously imparting an axial rotative movement to the film.

3. An oil display device of the character described comprising means for creating a cyclic movement of an oil stream, a mechanism interposed in the course of the'oil for spreading the oil into a thin film, a light source positioned behind the film for illuminating the film, and means for moving the flowing film to accentuate the display of reflected light from the film.

4. An oil display device of the character described comprising means for creating a cyclic movement of an oil stream, flexible means interposed in the course of the oil'for spreading the oil into a thin film, said means being mounted with slack and definingthe lateral edges of the film, and a light source positioned behind the film for illuminating the same.

In testimony whereof I aifix my signature.

PAUL LIPSKI.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2486080 *Jun 30, 1945Oct 25, 1949Atlantic Refining CoMethod and apparatus for testing oils
US2760277 *Apr 1, 1955Aug 28, 1956Keene Shefford LBuilding construction demonstration device
US3535798 *Apr 3, 1969Oct 27, 1970Turman William CFilter cartridge efficiency demonstrator
US6149070 *Jan 29, 1999Nov 21, 2000Hones; William G.Waterfall device
US6152381 *Jul 2, 1999Nov 28, 2000Hones; William G.Decorative waterfall device
US6382520Aug 14, 2000May 7, 2002William G. HonesDecorative waterfall device and method
US7296785Nov 18, 2005Nov 20, 2007Hayden John BWater curtain apparatus and method
US7344124Mar 17, 2005Mar 18, 2008Hayden John BWater curtain apparatus and method
US7500656Jan 24, 2008Mar 10, 2009Hayden John BWater curtain apparatus and method
Classifications
U.S. Classification434/388, 73/53.5
International ClassificationG09F13/24, G09F13/00
Cooperative ClassificationG09F13/24
European ClassificationG09F13/24