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Publication numberUS1838745 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 29, 1931
Filing dateOct 29, 1928
Priority dateOct 29, 1928
Publication numberUS 1838745 A, US 1838745A, US-A-1838745, US1838745 A, US1838745A
InventorsCharles H Croney
Original AssigneeCharles H Croney
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Marsh anchor
US 1838745 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Dec.29,1931. m c H. CRONEY 1,838,745

MARSH ANCHOR Filed Oct. 29, 1928 ATTORNEYS Patented Dec. 29,1931

crmnnnsnqcnonna', or iammswrox, eEoReIA MARSH ANCHOR Application filed October 29, 1928.'.Seria1 No. 315,891,

This invention relates to anchors and is particularly adapted for use with dredges and the like, Where the anchor must frequently be situated in shallow water or ashore, and

. 5 where it is desired to effect a secure anchorage and insure the anchor remaining in a definite position.

It is an object of the present invention to provide an anchor which is simple in con- 10 struction and which can be readily and definitely located and caused to imbed itself in the earth.

Another object is to provide an anchor which will provide a very secure anchorage when placed in operative position.

Other objects will hereinafter appear.

The invention will be better understood from the description of one practical embodiment thereof illustrated in the accom- "2 panying drawings, in which:

Fig. 1 is a front elevationof the anchor; Fig. 2 is a plan view of the anchor in the position it assumes when engaging the earth,

and

Fig. 3 is asection thereof taken on line 33 of Fig. 2.

The anchor consists of a substantially rectangular flat plate 1,'the lower two corners of which are rounded, as indicated at 2. This 3 plate is re-enforced by two transverse straps of steel or the like 3 and 4E and two angularly disposed straps 5 and 6 extending between the two first mentioned straps, all these straps being secured to the face of the sheet as by means of rivets 7 Three holes extend through the re-enforcing straps and plate and through these are secured eye bolts 8 to which are secured the lines constituting the bridle, the lines being attached to the mooring line at their other ends. l

The bridle consists of lines 9, 10 and 11, extending from the eye bolts 8 to a ring 12 to which their ends are attached by shackles 9a and 10a, the upper cables 9 and 11 being somewhat longer than the lower central cable 10, so that when a pull in a nearly horizontal direction is exerted upon the ring the anchor tends to assume the position shown in Figures 2 and 3 with its upper edge inclined becoming imbedded.

away fronithe direction of the pull while its lower edge is, inclined toward said direction so that the force tends to cause the anchor to dig downwardlyintothe earth, and not to remove it therefrom. The greater the pull the more securely does the anchor be .cOme imbedded. The leads of the lines ofrthe bridle control to agreat extent the manner inwhich the anchor maybe caused to imbed itself. .Moor ng cable 13' is spl ced into ring :12 and extendsto the winch or'capstan aboard the ship orflbarge connected to the anchor. By releasingthe lower shackle, the anchor may be tripped and readily removed from the earth in which it is imbedded.

, .Securedto the rear face of the anchor is a downwardly extending p pe 1ft terminating atl-its' lowerend in a flaredn'arrow nozf zleilb. afhose or the llke may be secured tothe upper threaded end of the pipe and water under pressure forced down through the sameto.

excavate 6116 earthor mud at the bottom edge of the plate,,-causing the anchor to dig intotheearjthand securely imbed itself. A

, trench should be dug for the receptionof line 10, the other lines of the bridle remaining above the surface of the'ground. In soft ground it plank or the like maybe .placed underlines 9 and 11 to prevent them from Horns shown as tubular extensions 16 are tending laterally therefrom so that a sling may be readily attached thereto and the anchor lifted out of the earth whenitis desired be o beditself in a desired position, prov-idinga very secure and positive anchorage, wh chis easily handled and conveniently stored in small space, due to its flatness and which maybe readily and economically manufac tured. p H v lVhile Ihave describedtthe illustrated enabodiment of my invention in some particularity, obviously many modifications and variations thereof will readily occur to those riveted to the upper corners of the plate 1 ex- 1 skilled in the art to which it appertains, and I do not, therefore, limit myself to the precise details shown and described, but claim as my invention all embodiments thereof coming within the scope of the subjoined claims.

I claim:

1. An anchor comprising a substantially flat plate, a bridle secured thereto to cause the same to assume an inclined position relative to a mooring line and to dig into the earth, a mooring line extendin from the bridle and hydraulic means for initially causing a portion of the plate to embed itself in the earth.

2. An anchor comprising a substantially flat plate, a bridle having a plurality of cables secured at one end to spaced points in said plate above its center and a shorter cable secured to said plate below its center, said cables being detachably connected at their other ends, a mooring line connected to said bridle at said last mentioned ends, a conduit extending downwardly along one surface of the plate, a wide fiat nozzle at the lower end of the conduit secured to the said surface of the plate adjacent its lower edge, and means for supplying water under pressure to said pipe.

3. An anchor comprising a substantially flat plate, re-enforcing members secured to one surface of the plate, a cable secured to said plate above its center, a cable shorter than said first named cable secured to said plate below its center, means for connecting said cables together to form a bridle, a mooring line connected to said bridle at said connecting means, a conduit extending downwardly along one surface of the plate, a wide flat nozzle at the lower end of the conduit secured to the said surface of the plate adjacent its lower edge, and means for supplying Water under pressure to said pipe.

4. An anchor comprising a substantially flat plate, attaching means to which a sling may be secured carried by the upper corners of said plate. a cable secured to said plate above its center, a cable shorter than said first named cable secured to said plate below its center. means for connecting said cables together to form a bridle, a mooring line connected to said bridle at said last mentioned ends, a conduit extending downwardly along one surface of the plate, a wide flat nozzle at the lower end of the conduit secured to the said surface of the plate adjacent its lower edge, and means for supplying water under pressure to said pipe.

5. An anchor comprising a substantially flat rectangular plate having curved lower corners, two transversely extending reinforcing bars secured to one surface of the plate, angularly disposed re-enforcing bars between. said transversely extending bars secured to said surface of the plate, a bridle comprising two cables secured at spaced points to the plate adjacent its top and one cable shorter than said first mentioned cables connected centrally to the plate near its bottom, the other ends of said cables being detachably connected together and to a mooring line, a downwardly extending pipe secured to one surface of said plate terminating at its lower end in a flat flared nozzle adjacent the bottom of the plate and secured thereto, and outwardly extending projections secured to the upper corners of said plate.

In testimony whereof I hereunto affix my signature this 24th day of September, 1928.

CHARLES H. CRONEY.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2721530 *May 12, 1953Oct 25, 1955Shell DevAnchor
US2738750 *Oct 18, 1954Mar 20, 1956Shell DevAnchor
US4346663 *Apr 27, 1979Aug 31, 1982Institut Francais Du PetroleAnchoring system
US4400114 *Feb 3, 1982Aug 23, 1983The United States Of America As Represented By The Secretary Of AgricultureEarth anchor apparatus and method
US5640921 *Dec 1, 1993Jun 24, 1997Vrijhof Ankers Beheer B.V.Anchor fluke
EP0802111A2 *Dec 1, 1993Oct 22, 1997Vrijhof Ankers Beheer B.V.Handling system for anchor
WO1994012386A2 *Dec 1, 1993Jun 9, 1994Vrijhof Ankers Beheer BvAnchor fluke
Classifications
U.S. Classification52/155, 52/166, 114/294
International ClassificationB63B21/38
Cooperative ClassificationB63B2021/262, B63B21/38
European ClassificationB63B21/38