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Publication numberUS1839375 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 5, 1932
Filing dateJul 6, 1928
Priority dateJul 6, 1928
Publication numberUS 1839375 A, US 1839375A, US-A-1839375, US1839375 A, US1839375A
InventorsArthur Covey
Original AssigneeHazel Atlas Glass Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Leer loader
US 1839375 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Jan. 5, 1932. c v 1,839,375

LEER LOADER 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed July 6, 1928 INVENTOR. firm (bx/W.

alwym ATTORNEYS,

A. COVEY Jan. 5, 1932.

LEER LOADER Filed July 6, 1928 2 Sheets-Sheet INVENTOR. flrZ/zur Cow/g;

A TTORNE 3 '5.

Patented Jan. 5, 1932 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE ARTHUR COVEY, OF ZANESVILLE, OHIO, ASSIGNOR, TO HAZEL-ATLAS GLASS 00., OF WHEELING, WEST VIRGINIA, A CORPORATION OF WEST VIRGINIA LEER LOADER Application filed J'u1y 6, 1928. Serial No. 290,834.

This invention relates to leer loaders such as are employed for projecting glassware from the cross conveyor of a leer onto the conveyer proper of the leer, and has special referenceto a device of this character which is simple in construction and operation, and economical in the use of power.

Another object of the invention consists in the construction of a leer loader in which adjustments are provided to adapt the device to ware of all sizes from a minimum to a maximum diameter or cross-sectional area, whereby the ware may be loaded into the leer in compact and orderly formation without liability of adhesion of adjacent articles due to too close proximity to each other.

Other objects and advantages of the invention will be in part apparent and in .part pointed out in the following detailed description; in which a Figure 1 is a fragmentary perspective view of a leer with the improved loader operatively associated therewith.

' Figure 2 is a side elevational view of the loader combined with a leer.

Figure 3 is a fragmentary plan view of the construction shown in Figure 2; and

Figure 4 is a sectional view of the loader taken on line 4:f of Figure 2.

Referring to the drawlngs in greater detail, the numeral 1 designates a leer which is provided with the usual conveyer 2, cross-conveyer 3, and shadow pan 4, for bridging the space between the cross-conveyer 3 and the main conveyer 2.

As already mentioned the present invention relates to mechanisms for moving the ware from the cross-conveyer 3 onto the main conveyer 2. In all such devices the greatest obstacle encountered is in returning the ware moving means to its initial position without interfering with the ware which is being carried by the cross-conveyer to a position in front of the leer opening. In the present constructiton this obstacle is overcome in a manner whihch will now be described.

The leer loader is mounted on one side only of the leer l, and comprises essentially a stripper bar 5 of angular cross section and a "ets 21.

rod 6, to which one end of the stripper bar 5 is secured.

The rod 6 is mounted so as to be reciprocated back and'forth along its axis and also so as to be tilted to raise and lower the stripper bar 5. To this end a frame 7 is tiltably mounted on one side of the leer as indicated by the numeral 8, and is provided with roller bearings 9 through which the rod 6 is reciprocated back and forth. The pivot 8 is supported on a bracket 10, and also mounted on this bracket is an extension or arm 11 provided with an upwardly extending screw or bolt 12 which may be vertically adjusted by means of nuts 13. The forward end of the frame 7 carries a counterbalance weight 14 which serves to normally return the frame 7 to a substantially horizontal position with the foward end of the frame resting upon the top of the bolt 12. i I

As will be observed from an inspection of Figure 1, the stripper bar 5 is supported at one end only, namely, that end which is secured to the reciprocating rod 6; and in order to prevent the bar 5-from sagging, I have provided means on rod 6 for cooperation with the frame 7 to resist any torque set up in the rod 6. This means comprises a pin 15 extending downwardly through rod 6 and provided witha roller 16 on its lower end. This roller is adapted to ride back and forth in guideway 17 formed upon the upper surface of frame 7, thereby providing a strong and eflicient means for retaining the stripper bar 5 in a horizontal position at all times.

For reciprocating the rod 6 and the stripper bar 5 carried thereby, I provide a crank arm 18 which is driven through reduction'gearing 19 by means of an electric motor or the like 20 these elements being supported on the side of the leer by means of the brack- Reciprocating movement is imparted to the rod 6 by means of a connecting rod 22 which is pivotally connected to the crank 18 as indicated by numeral 23; its opposite end 'being pivotally connected to rod 6 as indicated by numeral 24. This connecting rod 22 is of the turnbuckle type and thus provides means for varying the extreme limits of movement of the stripper bar 5 toward and from the mouth of the leer. To provide means for tilting the rod 6 and thus raising and lowering the stripper bar 5 to efiect proper movement thereof so as to avoid the on-' dotted lines, Figure 2. This engagement of the roller 25 with the rod 6 will depress that end of the rod and thus cause the frame 7 to be rocked upon its pivot 8 thereby raising the stripper bar 5 so that it may clear the top of the oncoming ware as the bar is moved backwards to its initial position. It should be noted in this connection that the roller 25 is positioned to one side of the line passing through the pivot-23 of the connecting rod and the center of rotation of the crank arm 18. By means of this particular positioningof the roller 25 with respect to the ivot point 23 of the connecting rod, it wille apparent that the roller 25 will not engage the rod 6'until after pivot 23 has passed below the horizontal plane of rod 6. Accord-1 ingly, a slight rearward movement will be imparted to the rod 6 prior to the initiation of the downward movement of the end thereof, with the result that the stripper bar 5 is backed away a-slight distance from the ware which has been moved onto the main conveyer, before the stripper bar is raised, thus avoiding any tendency to displace or upset the ware which has been brought onto the main conveyer. It may be desirable also to vary the height. to which the stripper bar is raised in its return movement, and for this purpose the roller is mounted in a slot 26 exten ing toward the-pivot of crank arm 18 and may be clamped a any desired position within the slot, thereby varying the effective length of the crank 18, and thus varying the gxtent of upward movement of the stripper ar. V

In the operation of the device, the bolt 12 is adjusted vertically so as to properly position the stripper bar 5 with respect to'the particular ware which is being made'on the forming machine thereby accommodating the leer loader to the center of gravity of the ware; the turnbuckle 22 is ad usted to properly fix the limits of movement of the stripper bar and the roller 25 is moved tothat 30- A sition in slot 26 which best adapts the device to the particular size of ware being handled. The driving mechanism including motor 20 and reduction gearing 19 is :adjusted' to the speed best suited to the particular diameter of ware being made and the device set in operation. The leer loader is synchronized with the movements of the main convever and cross-conveyer of the leer so that when the :cross conveyor has brought into alignment with the front of the leer, aline of Wane equivalent in length to the width of the leer opening, the stripper bar will operate to draw the line of ware across the shadow pan 4 and onto the main conveyer 2. After the ware is brought onto the main conveyer 2, the crank arm 18 will pass below the horizontal plane of its pivot; point and cause the stripper bar 5 to back away slightly from the ware just before the roller'25 engages the rod 6. While the roller 25 is depressing the end of the rod 6, the rearward movement of the rod also will be continued due to the continued rotary movement of the crank arm 18. Thus the stripper bar will follow 'an arcuate path approximating that shown by the dotted line in Figure 2. As the crank' arm rises roller 25 will allow the stripper bar to gradually descend to its initial position in front of the leer and just forward of the cross-conveyer 3. This downward movement of the stripper bar is, of course,

facilitated by reason of the counterbalance. weight 14; which is carried by the forward end of the frame 7 and which, of course, tends to turn the frame about its pivot 8 until the frame is brought into engagement with the upper end of the adjustable stop 12.

From the foregoing description taken in connection with the accompafiyingdrawings,

' placed on the main conveyer in rows in close proximity to each other without contact.

In accordance with the patent statutes I have described what I now believe to be the preferred embodiment of thein'vention, but it is to be understood that various changes in detail of construction may be made with-.

out departing from the spirit of the invention, and all such changes or modifications are intended to beincluded within the scope of the appended claims. I V

- WhatI claim as new and desire to secure by Letters Patent is: I 1. A leer loader-including. a tiltable and reciprocable rod, a stripper bar secured at one end to said rod and unsupported at its other end, means for reciprocating said rod, and means carried by said reciprocating means for intermittently tilting said rod.

2. A leer loader including a tiltable and recin'rocable rod, a stripperbar fixed to one end of said rod, means for reciprocating said rod includin a crank and a connecting rod pivoted to said rod and said crank, and means on said crank for intermittently engaging and tilting said rod.

3. A leer loader including a tiltably mounted frame, a rod mounted for reciprocation on said frame, a stripper bar carried by said rod, means including a crank for reciprocating said rod, and means on said crank for intermittently engaging said rod so as to tilt the frame and the rod mounted thereon.

4. A leer loader includin a tiltably mounted frame, a rod mounte for reciprocation on said frame, a stripper bar fixed to said rod and extending laterally therefrom, means for preventing the rotation of said rod, means for reciprocating said rod, and means for tilting said frame and the rodmounted thereon.

5. A leer loader including a tiltably mounted frame, roller bearings on said frame, a rod mounted for reciprocation through said bearings, means for preventing the rotation of said rod, a stripper bar fixed to said rod and extending laterally therefrom,

means for reciprocating said rod including a crank and connecting rod, and means on said crank for intermittently engaging said reciprocating rod to tilt the frame and the rod mounted thereon.

6. A leer loader including a tiltably mounted frame, a rod mounted for reciprocation on said framea stripper bar fixed to said rod, adjustable means for normally supporting said frame in a substantially horizontal position, and means for tilting said frame andthe rod carried thereby and for reciprocating said rod.-

7 A leer loader including a tiltably mounted frame provided with a guideway, bearings on said frame, a rod mounted for reciprocation through said bearings, a projection fixed on said rod and extendin into said uideway to prevent rotation o said rod a out its axis, means for reciprocating said rod in its bearings, means for tilting said frame and rod, and a stripper bar car- 8. A leer loader including. a tiltably mounted frame provided with a guideway, bearings on said frame, adjustable means for normally supporting said frame in a substantially horizontal position, a rod mounted for reciprocation through said bearings, a projection fixed onsaid rod and extending into said guideway to prevent rotation of the rod about its axis, means for reciprocating said rod in its bearings, means for tilting,-

said frame and rod, and a stripper bar oarrled by said rod.

a rod mounted for reciprocation through said bearings, a stripper bar fixed to said rod, means for tilting the frame and the rod mounted thereon, a weight for returning said frame to normal position, and means for reciprocating said rod.

10. A leer loader including a tiltably mounted frame, a rod slidably mounted on said frame, a stripper bar on said rod, means including a crank for reciprocating said rod, and an adjustably mounted roller on said crank for intermittently engaging said rod to tilt the latter.

11. In combination with a leer, a tiltably mounted frame on one side of said leer, a rod slidably mounted in said frame, a stripper bar fixed to said rod and extending transversely across the front of the leer, means for tilting said frame and the rod mounted thereon and for reciprocating said rod.

12. In combination with a leer including a cross conveyor, a tiltably mounted frame on one side of said leer, a rod slidably mounted in said frame, a stripper bar fixed to said rod and extending transversely across the front of the leer, means for reciprocating said rod andstripper bar so as to pull a row of ware from the cross conveyor onto the conveyor proper of the leer, and means for tilting said frame and the rod-mounted thereon.

13. A leer loader including a' stripper bar, a rod carrying the stripper bar, means for reciprocating the rod, and an element rotatable to engage and tilt said rod.

14. A leer loader including a stripper bar, a rod carrying the stripper bar, and a single crank for tilting and reciprocating the rod.

15. A leer loader including a stripper bar, a rod carrying the stripper bar, means for reciprocating the rod, an element for engaging and tilting the rod, and adjustable means carried by said element for varying the tiltingmovement.

' ARTHUR COVEY.

9. A leer loader including a tiltably mounted frame, bearings on said frame, ad-

justable means for normally supporting said frame in a substantially horizontal position,

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2612982 *May 26, 1949Oct 7, 1952Michaux Jr William WAutomatic feeder and transfer mechanism for tobacco ordering machines
US2739718 *Dec 27, 1949Mar 27, 1956G W Hume CompanyMachine for stacking cans
US2818157 *Mar 8, 1954Dec 31, 1957Armstrong Cork CoTransfer device
US2957288 *Nov 26, 1957Oct 25, 1960Curtis E AndersonCloth packaging apparatus
US3095081 *Aug 7, 1961Jun 25, 1963Stewart Warner CorpTransfer mechanism
US3633733 *Feb 5, 1970Jan 11, 1972Crown Zellerbach CorpArticle-handling apparatus
US3776345 *Apr 23, 1971Dec 4, 1973Schubert & Salzer MaschinenApparatus for shifting containers
US3882992 *Aug 9, 1973May 13, 1975Kalamazoo Mfg CoGrid feeder
US3994387 *Apr 1, 1975Nov 30, 1976Ball Brothers Service CorporationTwin drive push bar stacker
US4058200 *Jul 23, 1975Nov 15, 1977Ppg Industries, Inc.Orienting and aligning moving glass sheets
US4411356 *Sep 1, 1981Oct 25, 1983Hoechst AktiengesellschaftDevice for transporting printing plates
US7736120 *May 28, 2004Jun 15, 2010Toptier, Inc.Palletizer puller bar
US8220229Jul 30, 2009Jul 17, 2012Top Tier, Inc.Hybrid palletizer
US8257011 *Jun 3, 2010Sep 4, 2012Top Tier, Inc.Palletizer puller bar
DE4010698C1 *Apr 3, 1990Sep 5, 1991Protech Automation Gmbh, 5000 Koeln, DeTitle not available
Classifications
U.S. Classification198/430, 198/436
International ClassificationC03B35/10, C03B35/00
Cooperative ClassificationC03B35/10
European ClassificationC03B35/10