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Publication numberUS1841452 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 19, 1932
Filing dateFeb 4, 1930
Priority dateFeb 4, 1930
Publication numberUS 1841452 A, US 1841452A, US-A-1841452, US1841452 A, US1841452A
InventorsRanger Richard Howland
Original AssigneeRca Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Recording system
US 1841452 A
Images(1)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Jan. 19, 1932. R. H. RANGER RECORDING SYSTEM Filed Feb. 4, 1930 01K wan/2W6 UNI 7' INVENTOR m. RANGER BY Afi'ORNEY Patented M15, 1932 UNITED STATE.

sv PATENT oF lcsi RICHARD HOWLAND B ANGEB- OF NEWARK, NEW JERSEY, ASSIGNOR TO RA DIO CUB- ,rona'rromor mama, A conromrxonor DELAWARE RECORDING SYSTEM Application filed February 4, 1980. Serial No. 425,768.

The present invention relates torecording systems, and in particular to systems suitawhich I intend to include all forms of picture records, newspaper publications, magazines, checks, finger prints, financial statements, blueprints, and the like, as well as motion picture films with or Without sound accompaniment,.may be-recorded. In connection with the motion picture film records,

' it should be understood that the invention is intended to cover a system by which the sound accompaniment 'may' be produced separate from the picture portion of the record wheredesired, as vwill more fully appear from reading the following specificatiom' By my Patent #1,77.0,493, granted to me on July 15, 1930, .I have disclosed a system by which I may project heated air, gas, or other appropriate marking fluid'toward a record a record ofthe transmitted si nals.

ing to the, s stem disclose in my above surface, and, in accordance with the amount the marking fluid, or gas, which reaches t e record surface, it is possible to reproduce Accordnamed copen ing application, the control of the. marking has been disclosed as being dependent upon electromagnetic or electrochemical means, and either by the'coveringi or blocking'of a gas or fluid in accordance with received signals or by utilizing asecond gas or fluid to dissipate the recording gas or uid. k I According mm present invention, I have :provided a means by which any type'of recording medium, liquid, gas, or the like, be projected toward a recording surface,

1 system whereby the-liquid may be projected in the form of a highly colored vapor. However, in contrast to the schemesipreviously disclosed, I have provided ameans whereby in the case of a liquid, have provideda' l. a second fluid, wliichjI have herein termed a blocking, screening or interrupting fluid, may be at all times projected transverse to the path of projection of therecording or marking fluid, so as to form a wall or shutter between the source of projection of the marking fluid and the record surface, so as to provide an arrangement such that, under normal conditions, no marking fluid may reach the record surface. In order to permit marking fluid to reach the record surface in ,responseto signals, I haveprovided a novel means whereby the blocking or screening fluid may be deflected so as to no longer block or screen the recording fluid from the record surface, and, under such conditions, the recording fluid is projected toward the record surface and produces markings thereon; a

In orderv to control the blocking fluid, I

have herein disclosed my invention as eni-' ,bodying electrostatic means, although it is, of course, apparent that an electromagnetic control, or its equivalent, may be substituted for the'electrostatic means where desired.

As a primary object of the present invention, I have sought to provide a systemwherein a more faithful and accurate reproduction of a message may be had, while, at the same time, providing a system which permits considerably increased speeds of recording and provides for improved definition of the sub-o ject matter of thelreceived record.

As a further object of my invention, I have sought to provide a recording, system in which signalcontrolled moving parts are eliminated, and in which'the control of the marking fluid or gas is accomplished substantially without inertia. v

Still a further object of my invention is to provide a system wherein it is possible to produce an oscilloscope type of record for use in plotting wave forms or in forming sound records to; use in conjunction wit talking motion picture films, forexample,

as well as manyother uses which will become to provide a system wherein any of the types of motion picture sound records commonly in use, such as the variable area, variable density, plus and minus, and sinusoidal types, may be produced for use in connection with motion picture films, or other film sound records.

Other objects of my invention are, of course, to provide a recording system which is extremely simple in its nature and set-up, a system in which the recording operation is faithful to the received signals, and a sys tem in which the expense of installation has been reduced to a minimum, while maintaining the usual requirements of rigidity and fool-proof construction.

Other objects and advantages will suggest themselves and become apparent to those skilled in the art to which my invention relates by reading the following specification and claims in connection with the adcompanying drawings, wherein:

Fig. 1 illustrams in schematic form a diagram of one form of recording apparatus falling within the scope of my invention;

'Fig. 2 illustrates conventionally a side view of the apparatus shown by Fig. 1, looking in the direction of the arrow 22 of Fig. 1, and also illustrates a portion ofthe output connection of the amplifier for sup plying signals to the-control means;

Fig. 3 shows an embodiment by which the vapor jet may be of a fiat wedge-shape type so as to produce a record which, if applied to code signals, may provide enlarged size dots and dashes; an a Fig. 4 illustrates a further modification of the scheme, especially suited and adapted to the production of an oscilloscope type of mo ord on a record strip.

According to the accompanying drawings, I have shown an air compressor 1 for forcing air or vapor. under pressure through an oil trap 3 of the usual type through to an ink vaporizing unit 5 and then through an ink trap 7 to a nozzle 9 from which the ink vapor is projected under pressure from the air compressor for recording the received signals. Ink of any appropriate high color'is con tained within the ink vaporizing unit, and due to the action of the compressor forcing air through the vaporizer 5 (which may be of any well known type, such as that known in the art as the De Vilbiss), theink may be converted into a vapor state. Excessive amounts of ink contained in the ink vapor are removed inthe settling trap 7. Due to the pressure in the system, as derived from the air compressor, the ink vapor may be projected from the nozzle 9 with considerable velocity, so that as it leaves the nozzle along a path conventionally indicated as 11, it strikes against a recording surface 13' carried upon a record drum 15, adapted to rotate in the direction of the arrow. Thus, the recording fluidor jet is adapted to produce a mark upon the record surface 13 corresponding in color to the color of the porizing unit 5. g

If the record drum 15 is continuously rotated and then advanced longitudinally of a support shaft 17 as the latter rotates, the ink will trace a path upon a record strip or surface 13 corresponding to the path of a helix traced about the drum, or, where desired, in order to produce a parallel line for line record of received signal impulses, the jet assemblage 9 or drum 15 may be moved longitudinally relative to each other, and the drum15 may be rotated instep fashion at the end of each longitudinal movement, so that each line is recorded parallel to eachother line inwell known manner.

For recording either pictures or telegraphic code signals, it is, of course, both necessary and desirable to break the continuity of the continuous line of reproduction, as would be formed by'projecting the vapor continuously from the jet or nozzle 9 toward ink used in the va the record surface 13, in accordance with received signals. Where the received signals correspond to the intensities of light and shadow representing elemental areas of a picture subject beingtransmitted, it is, of course, desirable to interrupt the recording fluid projected from the jet 9 in a manner such that there is an amount of fluid reaching the surface 13 which corresponds to the intensity of light and shadow. of the particular elemental areas. v 1

According to the teachings of C. W. Hansell, as disclosed in his pending United States patent application No. 333,617, filed January 19, 1929, it has been proposed to electrostati' cally control a jet of projected fluid, such as water, ink, or the like, by way of example, in accordance with electric potentials, so that the jet may be deflected from its normal position of flow so long as these electric potentials are maintained, and also to provide a means by which the jet assumes its normal position upon the removal of electric potentials. 'l-hus by alternately applying and removing potentials very rapidly, it was observed that the fluid jet adopted a' wave form corresponding to the alternation of potentials. -Therefore, in accordance with the teachings in the above named Hansell disclosure, I have foundthat by projecting a second jet of water or other appropriate fluid, or even .gas, at a relatively high velocity fromthe nozzle or jetl9 along a path 21, it is possible to control the amount of recording fluid, projected along the path'll from the nozzle 9, whichreaches the surface 13. In accordance with the showing of Fig. 2, where the blocking? or screening fluid, which may be herein assumed to be water, by way of example, is projected along the path 21 from the nozzle 19, if signals are supplied to an appropriate amplifying system 23 through signal input lines 25, and amplified and then transferred 'throughm' step-up. transformer 27, so as to be applied from one end of the secondary of the transformer 27 to the nozzle or jet 19. through conductor 29, and applied from the other end of the transformer windings through conductor 31 to the threaded pole piece '33, it-is possible to alter thepath 21 so as to makeit conform to the wave corresponding .to the A.- C. output of the trans formr'27,and, thus, uncover the end of the jet 9 and permit fluidprojected therefrom along-a path 11 to reach the record surface 13. In order to produce deflections of satisfactory amounts, the potentials of the order of 4,000 to 7,000 volts should be produced across the secondary terminals of the trans former.

'. According to normal conditions, the fluid or water projected from the jet 19 flows transversely to the nozzle 9 and substantially tangentially to the'drum 15, so as to cross the path 11. In', this manner, and in the absence of signals, all fluid or vapor projected from the nozzle Qjflows along a path designated as 21a, forming a continuation of path 21, into -a waste receptacle 35 from which it may flow away through the pipe 37.

If signals are-brought over the lines 25 to act upon the amplifier 23, and if the resistor 39 connected across the secondary winding of the transformer 27 is made to match substantially the secondary so far as the impedance thereof is concerned, it is observed that the incoming si' al potentials as" applied across the secon ary windings of the transformer, and ,whichshould be of the order of 4,000 to 7,000 volts, cause the jet 21 to be altered in its pathiin such manner that incoming signals control the marking on the rec- 0 0rd surface 15. Thus, if the drum 15 is continuously rotating and signals are being re-' ceived, there may be recorded upon the rec- I livered from the compressor.

izfng unit, as above explained, is filled with that when the apparatus is runn' valve 43 is so constructed that air may be 7 taken in'from the atmos here without any appreciable escape of t e colored vapor may, as shown, be supplied with a pressureindicator, so that even pressures are easily a maintained.

As the air and vapor circulates through the system, the oil trap serves to catch any oil which may 'be mixed with the air de- The vapora highly colored and readily vaporizable liquid ink which is converted into a vapor state to be passed through the ink trap 7 which catches the heavier ink particles delivered from the vaporizing unit. The vapor is then conducted through a conduit 45 to the nozzle 9 from which it flows. That portion of the ink vapor which cannot pass out through the nozzle 9 then flows through the tubing 47 through an adjustable needle check-valve 49,=and thence back to the compressor unit 1. Thus, it will be apparent there exists a continuously circulating mixture of air and colored inlt vapor, with a small part of this mixture issuing from the vapor nozzle and being projected either against the record surface 13 or against the jet 21 and into the receptacle 35.

For normal picture or code recording, it is obviousthat the recorded dot would be normally a small round circle to be elongated to dashes by the movement of the recording surfacewith respect to the normal path of .0rd surface'13 signals corresponding to those the vapor stream. It is equally obvious that normal path 21 and causes the vapor being recorded upon the record surface'13.

.transmittedfrom some distant point, so as to re resent either code, picture or similar types ofpmessages. Uponthe interruption of signals corresponding to spacings or-the like, the

potentials are removed from the secondary of l, the transformer- 27, and, thus,-the jet of water being projected from the nozzle 19' resumes its row jected from the nozzle 9 to be deflected a ong the path 216', so as to prevent any; marks from r instead of being a small circular dot, the recording stream may be chan ed to the form of an elongated slit by making'the noz- 21a 9 of the appropriate form to give a sheet of issuingvapor instead of the round stream.

This would make it possible in code recording on a tape such as shown by numeral 51,

for example, to have rather high dots 53, and

dashes created which would be more legible .to the receiving operator. In this case, as-more particularly illustrated 'by Fig. 3, the water stream would operate vertically downward to cut the entire vapor stream on 01; off. This type of arrangement may, where desired, produce the so-called variable density sound record.

In distinction to this, the device may {also be used as an oscilloscope recorder. In this case, the ,Water stream would be made to operate say horizontally with respect. to the vertically upright narrow wedge of vapor '57. By, such an arrangement, the water stream 21 would act to prevent only a small portion of the vapor from hitting the paper at any given time. The water jet 21 could be set, for example, in the center of the height of the vapor stream 57. Then, as the a water is deflected up or down from this position, a record on the record strip 51, moving in the direction of the arrow, will be obtained of the actual wave shape of the potentials applied to the water stream with re spect to the time axis of'the recording paper moving horizontally.

' For the purpose of the oscillograph record, it may be more useful to have two electrodes 59 and 61, as disclosed by the copending Hansellapplication above named, rather than the single electrode 33 normally used for picture recording. For this purpose, Fig. 4 illustrates the two electrodes 59 and 61 vertically disposed above and below the water stream 21. These electrodes are connected respectively to the two ends of the secondary of the signal transformer 27. The water vapor jet 19 is then connected to the center of the secondary of this transformer. A polarizing voltage, illustrated as being supplied from a battery 63, although in actual operation it would preferably be supplied from the regular rectifieroutput of the powerunits associated with the amplifier, is inserted between thewater jet 19- and the mid-point of the secondary'of the transformer 27. The

purpose of this additional voltage is to polarize the action of the water stream so that, for example, when the upper electrode is made positive and the bottom electrode negative,- the water stream will be deflected upwards because the negative voltage of the water jet is attracted to the upper positive electrode and repelled from the lower negative electrode. For purpose of illustration, the transformer 27 has been included, but it is obvious that if only low frequencies are being investigated or used, the transformer, which is essentially an alternating current'device, might be re placed by direct current amplifiers to accom- 1 plish' the definite positioning of the water stream to indicate the voltages derived from such a direct current amplifier.

With an arrangement of this type, the record of the signals will assume tlie'white color shown by the wavy line 65, whereas the record strip itself will be dark colored, or of the color of the vapor jet, as indicated by the portion 67 of the record strip 51.

From a consideration pf the record formed onthe end of the record strip 51 of Fig. 4, itis quite obvious that this record substantially corresponds to the oscillograph type, of recording frequently used in connection with the reproduction of sound in conjunction with motion picture films and the like, and my invention is, therefore, applicable to such reproduction of sound where there is a sound input or a sound modulated input to the amplifying system 28.

Also, in order to produce the well known and so-called variable area type of sound record for talking motion picture films, I may, where desired, use an arrangement similar to that shown by Fig. 4, where the vapor stream has appreciable height and extremely narrow width, by similarly projecting a Water or screening jet from the nozzle 19, so that this jet also has appreciable height but extremely narrow width. Thus, it is apparent that, under normal conditions, the screening or water jet issuing along the path 21 will normally block all of the vapor stream projected from nozzle 9 so as to reach the record strip under normal conditions over an area designated by 57 on- Fig. 4. However, upon the receipt of signals, the water or screening jet may then be moved in one direction so as to provide for a variable area record being produced from the vapor jet projected toward the record strip. Thus, the water or screening jet might serve as a means for controlling the height of the area covered by the vapor on the record strip 51, which may be measured from the edge 69, and, in this case, the record will consist of dark ortions extending from the edge 69 upward y to the white colored wavy line and the upper portion of the record will be entirely missing, or, where desired, the record may be measured from the edge 71 down to the wavy line 65. Of course, it is obvious that any well known method may be resorted to for transferring this record on to the sound track of the well known motion picture film, or the strip 51, itself, may be used for reproducing the sound record.

It will also be apparent that while I have herein described my invention as being applicable to marking by vapor or the like, it is also possible to continuously circulate heated air or heated fluids or waters, or gases, through the closed system, and to then project these heated fluids from the nozzle 9 toward the record surface 13. In such a case, the record surface 13 should preferably be of the-type which I have disclosed by my copending application, Serial No. 303,108, filed August 30, 1928, jointly with R. S. Bicknell, disclosing a heat sensitive recording surface. .My above namedcopending application, Serial No. 128,720, as above stated, discloses the featuresv of projecting a heated recording medium from a nozzle. Under such conditions, of course, the blocking or screening fluid or the like'would be proj ected from the nozzle 19, as disclosed, and would constitute a wall or'blocking medium for preventing the. heated marking fluids from reaching the record surface in the same manner as is disclosed in the present case.

-While I have herein described my invention in such manner that incoming signals cause the interrupting," blocking. or screening fluid to bejso deflected that the marking fluid reaches the record surface, it should be.

borne in mind that the reverse may be true, and especially where negatives? are trans-- mitted, the absence of signals may rovide the .means by which the marking flui is permitted to reach the record surface.

Of course, other modifications. and changes may suggest themselves and at once become apparent to those skilled in the art to which the invention relates, and I,'therefore, believe myself to be entitled to make and use an and all of such modifications as fall fairly within the spirit and scope'of the present invention as set forth in the hereinafter ap-. pended claims.

Having now described my invention, what Iclaim and desire to secure by Letters Patent is the following a a l 1. ,The method of recording signals which comprises continuously projecting a recording fluid toward a record surface, projecting a'second fluid at an angle to said first named fluid for normally blocking the said first named fluid" from the record surface, and altering the path of the second fluid so as to permit varying amountsof the first fluidto reach the record surface in accordance with desired received signals.

2. The method of recording signals which comprises continuously projecting a record ing fluid toward a record surface for producing visible markings thereon, projecting a second fluid at an angle to said first named fluid for normally blocking the, said first named fluid from the recordwsurface, and electrostatically controlling the second fluid so as to permit the first fluid .to reach the I record surface in accordance with desired received signals.

3. The method of reproducing signals 1 which comprises projecting a recording fluid in a normal direction towarda recording surface, projecting 'a second interrupting fluid transverse to the path of the recording fluid for normally preventing the recording fluid being projected beyond the plane of the'interruptin fluid, and displacing the interruptinguid' during receipt of signals for permitting the marking fluid to reach the I recording surface.

4. The method which comprises'projecting a fluid toward a recording surface for producing visible markings thereon, projecting a second screeningfluid transverse to the path of the mark 'ing fluid so as to normally prevent the mar ing fluid from beingpprojected beyond the 3 plane of, the screening fluid, and'electrostaticallydisplacing the screening fluid during receipt of signals fonpermitting the marking fluid to reach the recording surface.

5. The method of recording signals which 5 comprises continuously projecting are cordcording surf of reproddc ing signals ing fluid towarda record'surface, projectin I .a second fluid transverse to the path of sai first named fluid for normally screening the said first named fluid from the record sur- J face, and controlling the second fluid so as 61 The method ofrecording signals which comprises continuously projectlng a wideband of .vaporized "recording fluid toward a'record surface, rojecting a second fluid y transverse to said rst named fluid for blockng a ortion of the said first named fluid from t e record surface, and controlling the 'saidsecond fluid in accordance with received signals so as to cause'the said first named fluid to trace paths of difierent width across the record'surface.

- 7. In a system for recording signals, means for projecting a recording fluid toward a reeans for projecting a second fluid at an gle with respect to the direction of, projectin 'said recording fluid so as to prevent sai recording fluid from reaching the record surface, and means for Varying the path of the second fluid in accordance with received signals for permit-' ting the recording fluid to reach the record-i ing surface.

8. In a system for recordln signals, means for projecting a marking fluid toward a recording surface, means for projecting a second fluid at an angle with respect to the direction of projecting said marking fluid so as to normally prevent said marking fluid from reaching the recordsurface, and elec- I trostatic means for altering the pathof the second fluid in accordance with received signals-for permitting therecording fluid to reach. the recording surface.

9. In a system for recording signals, means for projecting a recordingfluid ina normal direction toward a record surface, means for projecting. a second fluid transverse to the path of said recording fluid for normally screening the recording fluid from the record surface, and electrostatic means respons1ve to signals for altering the path of the block- .ing fluid and permitting marking fluid to reach the record surface. 7 1

10, In a system. for recording slgnals, means for-projecting a-marking vapor toward a record surface, means or project- .ing a fluid transverse to the path of said marking vapor so as to normally prevent the vapor from marking the record surface, and

kelectrostaticmeans responsive to signals for altering the path of the vapor controlling fluid so as to permit vapor ings on the record surface.

11.- In a system for means for projecting a wide band of va rized recording fluid, toward a record 'sur ace, means for projectingv a second recording produced markrecording signals,

ized recording fluid toward a record surface,

means for projecting a second recording fluid across the path of said vaporized recording fluid, and means responsive to received signals for varying the area of marking by the recording fluid.

13.'In a system for recording signals,

' means for projecting a wide band of vaporized recording fluid toward a record surface, means for projecting a second recording fluid across the path of said vaporized 11ecording fluid, and means responsive to received signals for varying the density of marking by the recording fluid.

14. In a signal reproducing system, means for vaporizing a highly colored marking fluid, means for projecting the vaporized fluid in a normal direction toward a record surface, 'means for projecting a second non-recording fluid transverse to the path of projection of said. vaporized recording fluid for normally preventing the recording fluid from being projected beyond the plane of the non-recording'blocking fluid,

and electrostatic means responsive to received signals for altering the position of the blocking fluid with respect to the marking vaporized fluid for permitting the recording fluid to reach and mark the record sur-- face for periods corresponding to received signal periods.

' 15. In a signal reproducing system, means for vaporizing a'highly colored marking fluid, ,means for projecting the vaporized fluid in a normal direction toward a record surface, means for projecting a second nonrecording fluid transverse to the path of projection of said vaporized recording fluid for normally preventing the said recording fluid from being projected beyond the plane of the blocking fluid, means for receiving signals, transformer meansfor converting said receivedsignals into corresponding high potential signals, and electrostatic means respon-' sive to said high potential signals for altering the position of said non-recording fluid and .permitting the recording fluid to reach the "record surface for periods corresponding to the duration of the said received signals.

16. In a \system for recording signals, means for projecting a vaporized jet of marking fluid toward a record surface, means for projecting a jet of liquid between said vapor jet and said recording surface for screening the recording surface from said I Vapor under normal" conditions, a pair of electrodes 'adjacent the said screening jet, means for applying polarizing potentials to said screening jet, and means for applying normal conditions, a pair of electrodes adjacent the said screening jet, means for applying polarizing potentials to said screen ing jet, and means for applying incoming signal potentials to said electrodes for varying the position ofsaid screening jet and thereby controlling the area of marking of said vaporized projected fluid on the said record strip.

18. The method of recording signals which comprises continuously projecting a record ing fluid toward a record surface for producing visible-markings thereon, projecting a second fluid at an angle to said first named fluid for normally blocking the said first named fluid from the record surface, and electrically controlling the second fluid so as to permit the first fluid to reach the record surfacle in accordance with desired received signa s.

, 19. The method of reproducing signals which comprises projecting a recording fluid in a normal direction toward a. recording surface, projecting a second interrupting fluid transverse to the path of the recording fluid for normally preventing the recording fluid being projected beyond the plane of the interrupting fluid, and electrically displacing the interrupting fluid during receipt of signals for permitting the marking fluid to reach the recording surface.

' means for projecting a marking vapor toward a record surface, means for projecting a fluid transverse to the path of said marking vapor so as to normally prevent the vapor from marking the record surface, and electrical means responsive to signals for altering the path of the vapor controlling fluid so as to permit vapor produced markings on the record surface.

22. In a signal reproducing system, means 1,a41,4oa

for vaporizing a highly colored marking fluid; means for projectmg the vaporized flui v the recording uid to reach and mark the record surface for periods corresponding to received signal periods.

23. In a signal recording system, apluralitf of 'jets each projecting fluid in undiminishe quantities in predetermined directions. and means for altering the direction of one of said fluids for controlli the efiective action of the other of said flui RICHARD HOWLAND RANGER.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2566443 *Sep 21, 1949Sep 4, 1951Elmqvist RuneMeasuring instrument of the recording type
US2600129 *Jul 17, 1948Jun 10, 1952Charles H RichardsApparatus for producing a stream of electrically charged multimolecular particles
US2609440 *Oct 30, 1947Sep 2, 1952Rca CorpElectrical recording in colors
US2614901 *Aug 4, 1949Oct 21, 1952Jacob Carlyle WRecording head for facsimile reproduction and the like
US2628881 *Jul 5, 1944Feb 17, 1953Jr Edgar W AdamsRecording method
US3023070 *May 20, 1957Feb 27, 1962Burroughs CorpAtmosphere for electrographic printing
US3373438 *Jan 3, 1966Mar 12, 1968Pitney Bowes IncJet printer
US3510878 *Apr 2, 1968May 5, 1970Vibrac CorpOscillographic writing system
US3792238 *Aug 7, 1972Feb 12, 1974Commissariat Energie AtomiqueProcess for registering in binary code and for reading an identification number on a metallic piece
US4104645 *Oct 12, 1976Aug 1, 1978Xerox CorporationCoincidence ink jet
US4341310 *Mar 3, 1980Jul 27, 1982United Technologies CorporationBallistically controlled nonpolar droplet dispensing method and apparatus
US4825229 *Sep 8, 1987Apr 25, 1989Tokyo Electric Company, Ltd.Method and apparatus for ink jet printing
US4923743 *Nov 22, 1988May 8, 1990Milliken Research CorporationApparatus and method for spraying moving substrates
US5032850 *Dec 18, 1989Jul 16, 1991Tokyo Electric Co., Ltd.Method and apparatus for vapor jet printing
US5211339 *Jun 12, 1992May 18, 1993Milliken Research CorporationApparatus for dispersing and directing dye onto a substrate
US5335000 *Aug 4, 1992Aug 2, 1994Calcomp Inc.Ink vapor aerosol pen for pen plotters
DE1032561B *Aug 24, 1953Jun 19, 1958Siemens AgStrahlschreiber, vorzugsweise fuer Elektrokardiographen und andere Oszillographen
DE1187816B *Apr 30, 1959Feb 25, 1965Teletype CorpVorrichtung zum Herstellen von Aufzeichnungen auf einer Schreibflaeche durch elektrostatisch gesteuertes Aufspritzen von Tinte aus einer Duese
Classifications
U.S. Classification369/99, 346/97, 347/82, 369/16, 347/83
International ClassificationG11B9/00
Cooperative ClassificationG11B9/00
European ClassificationG11B9/00