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Publication numberUS1843118 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 2, 1932
Filing dateOct 3, 1928
Priority dateOct 3, 1928
Publication numberUS 1843118 A, US 1843118A, US-A-1843118, US1843118 A, US1843118A
InventorsErnest J Brasseur
Original AssigneeDick Co Ab
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Sheet feeding apparatus
US 1843118 A
Abstract  available in
Images(10)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Feb. 2, 1932. E. J. BRASSEUR SHEET FEEDING APPARATUS Filed Oct. 3, 1928 10 Sheets-Sheet 1 H N m m w @w N A QM. g m :1 M M] m \NN auhw uwuhhu. 1 I W QQ. .15.a 1 1% "0 l= Q .m H g? Na Feb. 2, 1932. E. J. BRASSEUR SHEET FEEDING APPARATUS Filed Oct. 3, 1928 1O Sheets-Sheet 2 MENTOR 7 I I 4 I AHORNEY Feb. 2, 1932. E. J. BRASSEUR SHEET FEEDING APP ARA'IUS Filed Oct. 3, 1928 10 Sheets-Sheet 3 x mm 3. \w mw PO 1 I N NW NW HUM VI .v

ATTORNEY Feb. 2, 1932. E. J. BRASSEUR 1,343,118

SHEET FEEDING APPARATUS Filed Oct. 3, 1928 1 Sheets-Sheet 4 MNI u \MQ mm W M N\\ .wh Q wlv MN QR. km. ARQx Feb. 2, 1932. E. J. BRAssEuR SHEET FEEDING APPARATUS Filed Oct. 3, 1928 1O Sheets-Sheet 5 QMY i INVENTOR ATTORNEY MWW Feb. 2, 1932. E. J. BRASSEUR SHEET FEEDING APPARATUS Filed Oct. 5, 1928 10 Sheets-Sheet 6 INVENTO ATTORN EY Feb. 2, 1932. E. ,J. BRASSEUR SHEET FEEDING APPARATUS Filed Oct. 5, 1928 10 Sheets-Sheet ATTO%Y Feb. 2, 1932. E. .1. BRASSEUR SHEET FEEDING APPARATUS Filed Oct. 3, 1928 10 Sheets-Sheet 8 Feb. 2, 1932. E. .1. BRASSEUR SHEET FEEDING APPARATUS Filed Oct. 3, 1928 10 Sheets-Sheet 9 ATTORNEY Feb. 2,1932.

E. J. BRASSEUR SHEET FEEDING APPARATUS Filed Oct. 3 1928 10 Sheets-Sheet 1O I!!! 1! 11 7 1 I! IllIIllll/I/A I!!!) I/I II I I III II I n INVENTOR BY ATTORNEY Patented 1 15.2, 1932 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE,

minnsr a. ismssnua, or" CHICAGO, ILLINOIS, nssrenoa TO A. B. mcx oomrnmnor cnrcneo, rnnmors, A conroaarron or ILLmoIs' sminr FEEDING armaarus Application filed October 3, 1928. SeriaI No. 309,941.

This invention relatesto sheet feeding ap-' paratus and particularly to apparatus of this character adapted for use in connection w1th stencil duplicating machines.

My invention is concerned with the attain-.

ment of greater speed, accuracy and positiveness of operation in printing devices generally and particularly in stencil prlnting or duplicating machines. I In this connection it mustbe borne in mind that many different kinds of paper are used for duplication work, depending somewhat on the character of the work, personal preference, and the question of expense, etc. For instance advertising hand-bills are often printed on cheap, soft paper, while circular letters to be sent td a select clientele are often printed on expensive bond letter paper. Accordingly the sheet feeding mechanism, to be practical, must be capable of feeding efiiciently, positively and quickly, paper of different quality and characteristics and sizes, over an extenslvely wide range. It mustbe expected that the'mechanism will be called forto feed paper of variousthicknesses as 1 Well as of various degrees of hardness, roughness, stiffness, Width, length, etc. At the same time it is essential that the mechanism shall efliciently feed sheets of any quality so or characterxquickly and continuously since fast output speed is very desirable, especially when large quantities of duplicate copies are required. c I

Moreover, the sheet feeding mechanism :5 should not disrupt or remove lint from the sheets fed, since the portions of the sheets so affected are notas apt to receive as clear an imprint-of the type asv otherwise. Also the Enter dust thus removed from the paper sur- 0 face is apt sooner or later .tofind its way ,to the stencil sheet and into the letters stenciled therein, thus rendering the prints less clear and perfect.

An object of my invention is to devise an 5 improve method of feeding sheets from asheet pile by means of which greater sheet feed-ing speed and accuracy can be attained than heretofore. My invention further contemplates the provision of a method for posi- 0 tively delivering a succession of singlesheets from a sheet pile without disturbance of the remaining sheets of the sheet pile and requiring the least amount of time consuming move ment and manipulation of the individual sheets being fed.

Another object of my invention is to prov duce an improved sheet feeding apparatus" adapted especially for use in connection with printing and duplicating machines, by means of which a greater output per unit of time 5 can be obtained "from the machine than heretofore and a better quality of work can be produced.

Another object of my invention is to produce an improved sheet feeding apparatus 55 I eifective to place the sheet in operative engagement with the stencil duplicating drum with the least amount of time consuming movements and manipulation of the sheet and the feeding apparatus.

A further object of my invention is to produce anapparatus effective to feed single sheets in rapid succession to a printing drum of a duplicating machine, with positive means for preventing the feeding of more than one sheet at a time from the sheet pile.

Another object of my invention is to provide an improved sheet feeding apparatus having)a feed element adapted to lightly engage ut effectively feed successive sheets from a sheet pileand in such. a manner that the texture and surfaces of the sheets are in no way injured or impaired.

Still another object of my invention is to provide an improved sheet feeding apparatus including a table support for a sheet pile and a feed element cooperating therewith for moving sheets oil the sheet pile so arranged that all sheets fed from the sheet pile are gripped or engaged by the feed element with an equal and uniform pressure, with means provided for making various adjustments of the ,feed element and table support to attain effective feeding of sheets of various qualities and characteristics. v

.A further object of my invention is to provide an improved sheet feeding apparatus for stencil duplicatingmachines having a table adapted to support a sheet pile and an element sensitive to the top level of the W ing sheets of the pile, means operative to grip or clamp the remaining sheets of the pile against movement and means operative to move the sheet off the sheet pile and into engagement with the stencil printing drum of a stencil duplicating machine, all of the means being so synchronized that the buckling of the second sheet begins before the first sheet is completely off the sheet pile.

A further object of my invention is to pro-,

vide sheet feeding apparatus adapted for use in connection with stencil dupl cating machines which is strong, sturdy and of few moving parts, which is positive and rapid in its operation, which will give a greater output of better work, and which is not apt to et out of order.

ther objects of this invention will be in art obvious and in part pointed out herelnafter.

subject-matter of this invention may be operf atively associated with any printing machine or other mechanism to which sheets are to be fed. It is especially adapted for use in con-- nection with stencil duplicating machines of the type known as the Mimeograph.

In accordance with this invention a table or platform,adapted to support a sheet pile, is provided, and is so positioned that sheets from the sheet pile are moved directly into engagement with the feed-r0llers of the duplicating machine. 'Thefeed shoeextends practically the full width of the table and is adjustably supported on a pair of horizontal arms carried in a suitable framework. The

arms and framework are each operatively connected by means of gears, cams and levers to a rotating shaft of the duplicating machine so that the arms are given a horizontal or reciprocating motion and the framewor is given 9. raising and lowering motion, together moving the feed shoe through its movement cycle. Stop plates on the table are provided to hold the sheets of the sheet pile in vertical alignment. v r

By means of the moving framework, the feed shoe is lowered into contact with the top sheet ofthe sheet pile. Then the horizontal reciprocating arms come into play, first moving the feed shoe rearwardly to buckle the top, sheet intermediate of its point of coaction with the sheet and'one of the stop plates, meanwhile drawing the front edge'- of the top sheet out of alignment with the remaining sheets. The horizontal arms then reciprocate the feed shoe forwardly, moving the sheet forwardly off the sheet pile and into gripping engagement with the cooperating feed rollers of the duplicating machine. The feed shoe is provided with a sheet engaging portion of soft rubber or other friction gripping materialof considerable sheet contacting area.

Means are provided for adjusting the applied pressure of the contacting portion of the feed shoe on the sheet, so as to effectively grip papers of various qualities and surface characteristics. The feed shoe is also adjustable horizontally along the reci rocating arms to accommodate sheets 0 various wei hts and qualities and insure proper buckling thereof.

lng sheets of the sheet pile. The horizontal arms then carry the feed shoe forwardly, passing the top sheet over the lip, portions of the vertical members and moving the sheet into engagement with the feed'rollers of the duplicating machine.

Mechanism is provided for raising the sheet pile supporting tableboth manually and automatically. The table rests upon two pairs of lever arms or legs, each pair fixed to a rotatable shaft. The shafts are geared together so that as one of the shafts is rotated the table platform may be raised or lowered. Manual movement of a hand lever attached to one of the shafts raises or lowers the table. r

The table is automatically raised in easy stages as sheets are fed from the sheet pile. A ratchet segment fixed to one of the table raising shafts is adapted to engaged by a reciprocating pawl to move the gear segmentv downwardly, raising the table. Reciprocating movement is given to the pawl by a rotatable cam fired to a moving shaft of the stencil duplicating machine, and a train of pivoted arms. pawl is normally spring pressed out of engagement with the ratchet segment and is thrown into engagement with the'ratchet seg- The reciprocating The feeding apparatus 'gager'n'ent the front Of the remaino most posit-ion.

pawl is sustained in' ratchet engaging posithat the feed shoe grips each sheet with the same uniform pressure. I

A releasable latch device automatically retains thetable at any elevation to which it is raised. Release of the latch permits the table to drop of its ownweight to its lower- Sheets can be fed by my apparatus with unfailing accuracy, The feed shoe has a large sheet-contacting area and is adapted to obtain a firm grip on the top sheet with relatively light pressure. The 1 second sheet of the sheet pile is thusless likely to be'disturbed or buckled along with the top sheet. The remaining sheets are clamped against movement as the top sheet slides over the sheet pile. l A

' In order that a clearer understanding of this invention may be had, attention is hereby directed to the accompanying drawings, forming apart of'this application and illustrating certain possible embodiments of this invention. I

Referring to the drawings, Fig. 1 is a side elevation of my sheetfeeding apparatus associated with a stencil duplicating machine,

showing the various control devices of the machine.

Fig. 2 is a side elevation of my sheet feedingapparatus and associated stencil duplieating machine, taken on the opposite slde -of the machine from that shown in Fig. 1,

showing certain working elements thereof.

Fig. 3 is a vertical cross-sectional v ew taken longitudinally of the machine, showlng certain working elements interior of the machine.

Fig. 4 is a vertical cross-sectional view of a portion of the sheet feeding apparatus and associated duplicating machine, showing the position of various elements at one stage of the sheet feedingoperation.

' Fig. 5 is a vertical cross-sectional view, similar to Fig. 4, showing'the position of various elements at another stage of the feeding operation when the top sheet is buckled by the 1 feed shoe.

Fig. 6 is a view similar to Figs. 4 and 5, showing the position of various elements at still another stage of the feeding operation, when the top sheet is engaged by the feed rollers of the duplicating machine.

Fig. 7 is a horizontal cross-sectional view of my apparatus and associated stencil duplicating machine, taken on line 77 of Fig. 3

and illustrating more in detail certain operative elements thereof.

Fig. 8 is a fragmentary plan view of the machine with certain parts broken away to illustrate more clearly'certain operative elements thereof.

Fig. 9 is an enlarged view of a part of the table raising mechanism illustrating the position of the parts at one stage of the raising operation.

Fig. 10 is a similar view of a part of the table raising mechanism illustrating the position of the parts when the table is in lowermost position.

Fig. 11 is a vertical cross-sectional view of the machine taken on line 11--11 of Fig. 3, showing particularly the sheet pile clamping members and associated mechanism.

, Fig. 12 is a front elevation'of the feed shoe.

shown resting on a sheet pile, with the table support for the sheet pile and the feed shoe supporting framework shown in cross-section, taken on line 1212 of Fig. 13.

Fig. 13 is a top plan view of the feed shoe and a fragmentary portion of the feed shoe supporting structure.

Fig. 14. is a rear elevation of the feed shoe, with the supporting framework shown in cross-section, taken on line 1414 of Fig. 13.

Fig. 15 is an end elevation of the feed shoe shown associated with its supporting framework.

' Fig. 16 is a vertical cross-sectional view of the feed shoe, taken longitudinally thereof.

Fig. 17 is a transverse, vertical, cross-sectional view of the feed shoe, taken on line 17-17 of Fig.-. 1.6.

Fig. 18 is an operative detail of certain parts of my invention, showing the pawl means normally latching the sheet supporting table against downward descent and connectlatching position to permit the table to descend.

V Fig. 19 is a fragmentary detail showing one of the spring pressed clamping members in vertical cross-section.

member movable on the table, with the associated releasable device for latching the member in position when it has been moved into abutment with the sheet pile.

Fig. 21 is an enlarged View of the movable stop member shown swung 0% the table support. 7

Fig. 22 is a fragmentary View of the movable stop member, latched against removal from the table support, taken on line 2222 of Fig. 21: and

Fig. 23 is a diagrammatical sketch showing the path of travel of the feed shoe during its movement cycle.

Referring to the drawings, and more particularly to Figs. 1, 2 and 3, the machine generally consists of a base 1 on which side ing mechanism for moving the pawl out of -Fig. 20 is an enlarged view of the stop frames 2 and 3 are erected. A stencil duplicating drum 4 is mounted for rotation in suitable bearings provided in the side frames 2 and 3. The drum is adapted to carry a stencil sheet secured about the cylindrical surface thereof in the usual manner. The drum is rotated by means of a crank 5 secured to a pinion 6 which meshes with a gear 7 fastened to one-head of the drum. A pressure'roller 8 is carried on pivoted arms 9 in the usual manner and drawntoward the drum by springs 10.. 4

A shaft 11 is mounted for rotation in suit able bearings in the side frames. A sleeve 12 carrying sheet forwarding sectors 13 is loosely mounted on the shaft 11. Sectional rollers 14 are fixed to a shaft 14'. The ends ;of the shaft .14 are positioned in vertical guideways in the side frames 2 and 3, permittlng a raising and lowering movement of the ,rollers. Sectors 13, coacting with sectional rollers 14 fixed to shaft 14', operate to forward sheets between them to the line of contact of the drum and pressure roller. The sectors 13 rotate at the same surface speed as that of the drum. The radius of the drum and the sectors is such that the sectors make three revolutions during one revolution of the drum. The sectors are driven by suitable gearing, comprising gear 15 secured to shaft 11, connecte by a train of gears 16 to the pinion 6. The gear 15 is secured to a gear 17 which meshes with a gear 18 rotatthe sheet so fed to the drum and pressure roller.

The ile of sheets is supported on a table or'plat orm 22 adapted to be raised and lowered both manually and automatically. Two shafts 23 and 24, suitably journaledl on the side frames 2 and 3, each have a pair of oppositely extending legs or lever arms 25 secured thereto. The free end of each lever arm is provided with a roller26 adapted to roll along a track 27 on the under side of the I table. The table platform rests upon the or lowering the table supporting the sheet rollers 26 and is supported entirely by the two pairs of legs or lever arms 25 Segment gear 28 securedto shaft 23 meshes with segment gear 29 secured to shaft 24. A hand lever 30 is secured to one end of shaft 23. It is seen that by turning the hand lever both shafts will be rotated, thus manually raising pile. The mechanism for automatically raising the table platform will be described hereinafter. A vertical post 31 on each side of the table platform guides the same in its vertical movement. Each post is secured to' into abutment with the other end of the sheet pile and locked in abutting position. Sheets of various lengths can thus be accommodat-- ed. A slot 34 as shown in Fig. 12, is cut in the table platform and extends from one end thereof and inwardly for some distance. A

channel member 35, secured to the under side of the table platform, extends over the s ot.

The channel is adapted to enclose a block member comprising portions 36 and 37 hinged together and slidable therein, shown in Figs. 20, 21 and 22. Block portion 37 carries a vertical abutment plate 38. A latch 39, having a finger aperture 40, is hinged to lug 41 secured to the abutment plate. The latch has a serrated gripping element 39 extending through a slot in block portion 37, which is adapted to friction grip the bottom of the channel, locking the abutment plate against movement. A coil spring 42 normally holds thela-tch in gripping enga ement- ,with the channel, but can be release by a slight outward pullon the latch. Since block portion 37 is hinged to portion 36, the abutmentplate can be swung off the table, as shown in Figs. 21 and 22, to facilitate the placement of a sheet pile on the table. A spring latch 43, secured to the side wall of the channel, is'adapted' to engage a notch 44 cut in block portion 36, preventing complete withdrawal of the block from the channel.

Successive sheets are fed from the sheet pile by a reciprocating feed-shoe. The feedshoe is supported on a framework extending horizontally over the sheet pile. A pair of channel shaped supports or frame members 45, one positioned -at each side of the table, extend approximately the full length thereof. Each channel support is carried by lever arms 46 and 47 pivotally secured thereto. Lever arms 46, one pivoted to each of the channel members, are secured to a shaft 48 journaled in the side frames 2 and 3. Lever arms 47, one pivoted to each of the channel members, are secured to shaft 49 journaled in the side frames 2 and By rotating either one of these shafts it is now seen that the channel supports 45 will be given a raising and lowering movement in reference to the sheet pile, but will nevertheless always remain parallel thereto. The mechanism for raising and lowering the channel members will be described more'in detail hereinafter.

Each channel support carries a bar memher or arm provided with rollers 51 adapt-- ed to roll within the channel, as shown in Fig. 12. A pair of elongated slots 52 are cutin each of the channel supports. Each bar member 50 carries a pair of headed studs 53, each of which extends through one of the slots of the associated channel support, thus slidably and fro rotation of a shaft 55 journaled in the. side frames 2 and 3. This is effected by a pair of lever arms 56 secured to the shaft and connected to their respective bar mem-' bers by means of a link 57. The feed shoe may be locked in various positions along the "bar member by means hereinafter to be described, and thus carried along therewith during the reciprocating movement. The. feed shoe is raised and lowered into and out of contact with th esheet pile by the raising and lowering movement of the channel supports. y L

A pair of coil springs 58, one secured to each of the channel members and .one of the side frames, normally pull the channel members downwardly to carry the feed shoe into contact with the top sheet of' the sheet'pile. The channel members are raised against the action of the springs by mechanism connected to a moving part of the machine. As shown in Fig. 2, a cam member 59 is secured to shaft 11 and rotates therewith. A rider arm 60 secured to shaft 49 carries a roller 61 on the free end thereof, adapted to ride on the cam periphery of the cam member. Shaft 11' and cam member 59 make one revolution during one revolution of the duplicating drum. Rotation of the cam member raises the channel supports 45 and feed shoe against the action of springs 58. The cam member is so shaped thatthe channel supports are held in 1 maximum raised and maximum lowered position for an interval during each rotation of the cam. As is evident, the roller 61 is held in resilient contact with the cam periphery of the cam member 59 by the action of springs 58. vElasticity of operation is thus obtained and rattling of the parts eliminated.

Bar members 50 are also reciprocated by mechanism attached to a moving part of the machine. A second cam member 62 is secured to rotating shaft 11, and reciprocates a rider arm 63 associated therewith. As shown more clearly in Figs. 9 and 10, the rider arm has anelongated aperture'64 in oneend thereof, through which shaft ll extends. A roller 65- is secured to the side of the rider arm and so arranged as to ride over the cam periphery of the cam member. A heavy coil spring 66, secured to the free end of the rider arm and to the side frame of the machine, holds the roller in constant contact with the cam periphery of the cam member. A lever arm 63' secured to shaft 55 is pivotally connected to the rider arm. Lever arms 56 connected to the bar members 50 are also secured to shaft 55, as heretofore explained. It is now seen that rotation of the cam member in one direction moves the bar members and feed shoe rearwardly. The cam member is so shaped that the bar members are held in maximum rearward and maximum forward position for an interval during each rotation of the cam member. Coil spring 66 tends to draw the bar members forwardly. Thus by the coaction of rotating cam member 62 and coil spring 66 the bar members and feed shoe are given a to and fro reciprocating movement.

It is seen that cam member 59, connected to the ascending, and descending channel supports, and cam member 62, connected to'the reciprocating bar members, are secured to the same rotating shaft '11. The cam members are of such shape and so positioned in relation to each other as toatt'ain the proper sequence of movemeiitsto move the feed shoe generally along a path shown diagrammatically in 'Fig. '23.

The feed "shoe, as shown in Figs. 12 to 17 inclusive, extends between and slides upon the bar members 55. The feed shoe comprises generally a sheet gripper element and a supporting frame therefor. The supporting frame isprovided with end walls 66 and side walls 67. A channel member 68 is secured to each of the end walls 66 of the frame. The legs of each channel member slidably engage the upper and lower edges of one of the bar members, thus slidably supporting the feed shoe thereon. A rod 69 is rotatably mounted in suitable bearings in the end walls 66. A- pinion 70, secured to each end of the rod, extends through a slot in the channel member 68 and engages the rack bar 54, ide collar 71 secured at each end of the r vents such spreading of the bar members as would throw the pinions out of engagement with theirrespective rack bars. A knurled knob 72, secured to one end of the rod, serves as a handy means for rotating the rod and sliding the feed shoe along the bar members.

The sheet gripping portion of the feed shoe is Vertically slidable within the supporting frame. The sheet gripper comprises a holder 73 of channel form, which carries the sheet gripping material 74. Each end wall of the frameis provided with an overhanging lug 75 having an aperture therein. A screw-- bolt 76 extends through each of these apertures and is secured to the bottom wall of the channel-shaped holder 73. Screw bolts 76- steady and guide the holder in its yertical movement.

As evident from the showing in Figs. 12 and 13, the gripping material has a considerable sheet cont-a'cting area and extends substantially the full width of the table. Ihave coil spring 81 and the knob 80 presses thefound thatsponge rubber is especially effecis not loosened from the sheet surface to later. deposit and clog the stencil sheet.

Means are provided for adjusting the pressure of the grip-ping sponge on the sheet pile. A deformed arm 77, pivoted at 78 to a side wall 67 of the feed shoe frame, is provided with a laterally projecting portion 79 extending over the channel-shaped holder 73 -carrying the gripping sponge. A knob 80,

having a rounded end, is secured to-port-ion 79 and rests upon the top wall of theholder member. A coll-spring 81, secured at one end to a lug projectin from the deformed arm and at its other en to a latch device 82, holds the knob 80 against the sponge holder 73 with resilient pressure. Latch device 82 slides upon a rack 83 secured to the side wall of the feed shoe frame. A pawl member 84, pivoted to the latch device, is resiliently held in engagement with the teeth. of the rack by spring element 85. By referring to Fig. 14, it is seen that as the latch device is moved toward the right greater tension is exerted on grippm sponge into contact with the sheet pile wit greater pressure. Pawl member 84 and the rack cooperating therewith hold the latch device in the position to which it has been moved. A release trigger 82, pivoted to the latch device operates to move the pawl 84 out of engagement with the rack to permit the latch to slide towardthe left and reduce the pressureof the gripping'sponge on the sheet pile; A guard plate 86, secured to the frame of the feed-shoe, protects the latch' elements against injury. The latch device 82 projects through an elongated slot cut in.

q the guard plate and is guided thereby in its sliding movement onthe rack member 83.

Means are provided for locking the feed shoe against sliding movement on the bar members. A look element 87 pivoted between lugs 88 extendinoutwardly from an end wall of the feed s oe frame is adapted to be swung into and out of engagement. with the teeth 'of one of the pinions 70. A friction element 89 may be provided to hold the lock element in either pinion engaging or di sengaging position. Translatory movement of.

the feed shoe along the rack bar is thus pre- .vented., Sheets and. papers of different weights and qualities have different buckling characteristics. By adjusting the spaced relation between the feed shoe and the abutment plate 38, proper buckling and effective feed of various kinds of sheets is assured. A scale plate 90, having markings thereon, in-

ber and aing sheets be held against movement or dis-- turbance. To this end I provide a clamping mechanism which is movable off from the sheet pile to permit the withdrawal of the top sheet from out of its influence but movable into clamping engagement with the remaining sheets as the top sheet is moved forwardly ofl:' the sheet pile. Referring more particularly to Figs.4, 5, 6 and 11, I providera plurality of bar members 92 '(four being shown in Fig. 11, although I do not limit myself to this number), each having a pair of slots 93. A headed stud element 94, secured to the stop plate 33, extends through each slot, thus slidably retaining the bar members on the stop plate and permitting vertical movement of each in relation to the sheet pile. Each bar member is provided with a laterally projecting lip portion 95 .adapted to overhang the forward edge of the sheet pile and rest upon the same, as clearly shown in Figs. 5 and 6. A downwardpull is exerted on each bar member by coil spring 96 secured at one end to a pin 97 projecting from the bar member and at its other end to stud element 94, so that the-lip portion thereof normally rests .upon

the sheet pile with resilient pressure.

Means are provided, synchromzed with the movement of the feed shoe, for raising lip portions 95 ofi the sheet pile. A cam member 98 is secured to shaft 11 and rotates therewith. A rider lever 99 secured to shaft 100 carries a roller 101 at" its free end which is videdwith a laterally extending foot por- 1 tion 104 underwhich rod 103 extends. Cam.

member 98 is so shaped as to cause lever arms 102 to be swung upwardly to raise the bar members and move the lip portions 95 thereof off the sheet pile once during each rotation of the cam members Roller 101 is held in resilient contact with the cam eriphe'i'y of the cam member by the action 0 spring-element 105 secured at one end to side frame 3 and at its other end to lever arm 106 secured to shaft 100. Cam member 98 secured to shaft 11 makes one rotation during one rotation of the stencil duplicating drum. Cam member .98 is so shaped as to raise the lip elements 95 off the sheet pile as the feed shoe is being lowered into contact position with the top sheet.

The lip elements remain in raised position during the sheet buckling operation. The lip elements 95are then returned to clamping en-. gagement with the remaining sheets of the movement as each sheet is fed, alternately raising the lip portions 95 off fromand into clamping engagement with the sheet pile.

The automatic means for raising the table will now be described. A long lever arm 107, as shown in Fig. 2, provided with a ratchet segment 108 on the end thereof, is secured to the table raising shaft 23. A pawl member 109, having a reciprocating movement, is adapted to engage the ratchet segment to move the same downwardly to raise the table. An arm 110, pivoted at one end to a lug 111 secured to the base of the machine, is provided with a slot 112 at its other end. A stud element 113 adjustably-secured in a slot 114 in rider arm 60 extends through the slot in arm 110. Pawl member 109 is pivoted at its lower end to the mid section of arm 110. The pawl member is normally-held out of contact with the ratchet segment by the action of spring element 115, for reasons which will hereafter appear. It is seen that as rider arm 60 is reciprocated by the rotation of cam member 59, arm 110, supported at one end to the rider arm, is also given a slight reciprocating movement, which in turn reciprocates the pawl. By. manipulating stud 'element 113, the reciprocating distance traveled by the pawl arm can be adjusted and fixed,

and thus vary the distance the table platform 4 is raised by one stroke of the pawl.

It is desirable to lessen the effort required to raise the table as much as possible. With this end in view, I provide a heavy coil spring 116 secured at one end to side frame 3 and at its other end to lever arm 117 secured to table raising shaft 23. The action of coil spring 116, as is evident, tends to hold the table raised, .and consequently little effort need be exerted by pawl member 109 to raise thetable. I

Since the raising and lowering and the to and fro reciprocating movement of the feed shoe is fixed and uniform, it is essential for effective feeding that the top of the sheet pile always remain at the same uniform level during the-feeding operation, so that each successive sheet will be gripped by the feed shoe with the same equal regulated pressure. No

automatic raising of the table platform normally takes place during the feeding operation, since the pawl member, although reciprocating,.is held out of engagement with the platform raising ratchet segment 108 by the spring element 115. I have provided mechanism for throwing the pawl memberinto engagement with the ratchet segment when the top of the sheet pile falls below a predetermined level, and for holding. the pawl in elements as thr? sheet is moved forratchet engagement until the predetermined level is restored. As shown in Figs. 8 and 11, one of the bar .members 92 is provided with a laterally projecting arm 118 on which the end of lever 119'securedto shaft 120 is adapted to rest. Shaft 120 may be suitably journaled in the side frame 3.

A rider arm -121 journaled on shaft 120 carries a roller 122 adapted to-engage a cam.

tended position by a carrier arm 124 secured to shaft 120. The outer end of the carrier arm, as shown in Fig. 2, is provided with a pair of ears 125 each carrying an adjusting screw 126. The rider arm extends between the ears 125 and-is itself provided with a lug 127 with which the adjusting screws cooperate to vary the contact relationship between roller 122 and the cam element 123 of the pawl member. A coil spring 128, one end of which is secured to the carrier arm and the other end to side frame 3, tends to force the roller on the rider arm 121 against the cam element 123 to swing the pawl member into engagement with the ratchet segment. This is prevented by lever 119 which rests on the laterally projecting portion 118 of the bar member 92. Only when the bar member is lowered by the withdrawal of a predeterengagements of the pawl member with the ratchet segment is generally sufficient to raise the table platform so that the sheet pile is again at the predetermined proper feeding level. Lever arm 119 is then raised by the bar member 92 against the action of coil spring-128, also raising the rider arm 121 slightly so that spring element 115 can throw the pawl member out of operative engagement' with the ratchet segment. The position of the roller 122 in relation to the cam element 123 can be delicately adj ustedby screws 126 so that the removal of a very few sheets from the sheet pile will operate to cause the rider arm 121 to throw the pawl member 109 into operative vengagement with the ratchet segment to raise the table. The teeth of ratchet segment 108 are preferably small and fine, so that with each reciprocating engagement of the pawl member 109 therewith, the table may be raised almost infinitesimal amounts. The top elevation of the sheet pile is thus maintained practically constant dur-- ing the feeding of SUCCGSSlW-l sheets therefrom. By means of this arrangement, the pressure grip of the feed shoe on the successive sheets ment from swinging upwardly with resultant lowering of the table. It is now seen that' pawl members 109 and 129 operate conjunctively to raise the table and retain the table in the position to which it is raised.

Means are provided for moving pawl member 129 out of engagement with the ratchet segment to permit the table platformto drop or lower from its own weight. As shown in Figs. 1 and 2, a thumb lever 132 is secured to one end of a shaft 133 journalled in the side plates 2 and 3. A small crank lever 134, secured to the other end of shaft 133, is operatively connected to pawl member 129 by connecting bar 135. Downward pressure on thumb lever 132 against the action'of spring element 131 moves pawl member 129 out of engagement with the ratchet segment.

It may happen, for example, that when it is desired to lower the table platform, the top of the sheet pile is below the predetermined feeding level. The table raising pawl member 109 would then be in engagement with the teeth of the ratchet segment, preventing any lowering of the tableplatform. It would then be necessary to also swing pawl member 109 out of engagement with the teeth of the ratchet segment. Accordingly, I have provided the table raising pawl member 109 with a clip element 136, as shown in Figs. 9 and 10. Clip element136 overhangs the end of pawl member 129 and is adapted to be engaged thereby (as shown in Fig. 10) when the pawl member is swung back sufficiently, thus carrying table raising pawl member with it p p and out of engagement with the ratchet segment. It is now seen that by simply manipulatmg thumb lever 132 both pawl members 109 and 129 can be swung out of engagement with the ratchet segment.

Means are provided for releasably holding retaining pawl member 129 out of engagement with the ratchet segment. I accordingly provide a latch member 137, shown in. Figs. 1 and 18, journaled to a stud screw 138 projecting from the side frame 2. The free end of latch member 137 isnotched so as to provide an abutment portion 139. Thumb lever 132 is provided with an upwardly extending arm 140. The latch member normally rests on the end of arm 140 and is resiliently'retained thereagainst by the action of spring element 141. By referring more particularly to Fig. 18, it is seen that when latch 137 is disengaged from arm 140, as shown inJfull lines, retaining pawl member 129 is springpressed into engagement with the ratchet segment. By pressing downwardly on thumb I lever 132, pawl member 129 may be swung out of ratchet engagement. Latch 137 will then drop down so that abutment portion 139 prevents the return of the pawl member into ratchet engagement. Further rotation of the thumb lever 132 swings the retaining pawl member 129 into contact with the clip element 136, as shown in dotted lines, Fig. 18, moving table raising pawl member 109 with it and out of ratchet engagement. Pins 142 and 143, projecting from side frame 2, limit the movement of the latch member within proper bounds. Pin 144, also projecting from side frame 2, limits the rotation of thumb lever 132. The latch member may be provided with a knob 145 projecting therefrom, by means of which it may be raised. Thus by simply manipulating thumb lever 132, the table can be dropped down at will. The table platform can likewise be raised at will by manipulating hand lever 30. "When the machine is in operation, the table is automatically raised by the reciprocating raising pawl 109 thrown into engagement with the table raising ratchet segment 109 when the call is made by the bar member 92 resting on the sheet pile.

When the table has been raised to a predetermined raised position, a roller 107' automatically operates to throw the retaining pawl 129 out of engagement with the ratchet segment, permitting the table to drop to lowermost position. Fig. 10, the roller 107, carried by the ratchet segment, is adapted to roll against the cam surface of pawl 129 as the ratchet segment is moved downwardly and finally throws the pawl out of ratchet engagement. Arm 140 ofthumb lever 132, as heretofore descrlbed, is then moved over sufficiently to permit abutment portion 139 of latch 137 to drop into engagement withthe end of the arm,lock1ng the pawl in out of ratchet engagmg position. The table then drops by reason of its own weight to lowermost position. It is preferable to so position roller 107 in relat on to the pawl that the pawl is moved out of ratchet engaging position permitting the table to drop while there are still a few sheets remaining on the table thus protecting the feed shoe and other operative parts from m ury due to continued raising of the table.

As the feed shoe reciproeaftes forwardly, as heretofore explained, the front edge of the top sheet is moved over lip portions 95 and over a feed roller 146. Feed roller 146 is secured to shaft 146 journalled to the side frames 2 and 3 and is continuously rotated when the machineis in operation by trainof gears 15 in mesh with gear 15 as clearly shown in Fig. 3. 1

When the front edge of the sheet has been properly placed upon the feed roller by the reciprocating feed shoe, :1 pressure roller 147 As shown more clearly in is lowered into contact with the sheet and the sheet is forwarded between these two rollers until its end engages stops 148 which project Rollers 14 are not positively driven. 111- stead they are raised and lowered into and out of coaction with the sectors 13 and they are rotated only when coacting with the sectors through a sheet. For this purpose, the shaft 14' of the rollers 14, as heretofore described, has its ends received 'in guide ways to 6 inclusive. A well known cam and rider formed in the side frame 2 and 3 of the machine. A shaft 150 extending between the side frames of the machine carries arms 151 secured thereon. These arms extend under the shaft carrying rollers 14 as shown in Figs. 3

arm arrangement operatively connects shaft 11 and shaft 150. Shaft 11 makes one revolution for each revolution of the drum and therefore the roller 27 is moved downwardly into coaction with the sectors 26 once during each revolution of the drum, or once during three revolutions of the sectors 26, which, as

heretofore described, travel at the same surface speed asthe drum.

The mechanism for raising and lowering roller 14 is old and wellknown, but it may be here stated that this mechanism is such that the roller 14 will be lowered in coaction with the sectors 13 while the entire length of those sectors is passing under roller 14 once and thereafter the roller will be raisedswhile the sectors pass under it twice. By this construction the rotatable parts may be continuously rotated, but the sectors 13 will be operated to forward a sheet only every third revolution during which they coact with the roller 14. I The sheet will then be moved forward at the same surface speed as that at which the drum is rotating, so that the sheet will be taken up by the drum 4 and pressure roller 8'without such jar or straining as would a be apt to cause mal-alinement of the parts and result in improper registration.

The ends of the stop members 148 are each turned upwardly, as shown in Figs. 4, 5, 6 and 8 and projectthrough openings in plate 149 as heretofore explained. The stop members 148 carry a common roller 152 which is adapted to ride on the periphery of cam 153 secured to shaft 11. The rotation of cam 153 rocks the stop members pivoted at 154 and momentarily arrests the. forward movement of the sheet. As feed roller 146 and cooperating pressure roller 147'continue to feed the sheet forwardly, the forward portion of the sheet is buckled up against a plate 155. Simultaneously with the withdrawal of the stop members 148, sectional rollers 14 and sectors 13 come together to engage the sheet therebetween, shooting the sheet forward at such a speed that the sheet will be'taken up by the drum and pressure rollers without jar or strain.

Well known feeler elements 156 also project through openings in the plate 149. The upward movement of these feelers is arrested by a sheet if the latter isin position, but in the absence of such sheet is continued to the position in which the feelers are shown in Fig. 4. I provide well known mechanisms which connects the feeler elements to the pressure roller 8 so that the pressure roller is swung up into operative position only when the fingers are depressed by a sheet passing through the machine. Thus roller 8 only presses against the drum when there is a sheet between them. The pressure roller is thus kept clean and no ink can get on the roller through contact with the printing periphery of the duplicating drum. Since the mechanism for operating the pressure roller by means of feeler fingers 156 is old, it is believed unnecessary to describe this mechanism in detail.

The pressure roller 147 is rotatably supported by a pair of arms 157 secured to shaft 158. Vell known mechanism including a cam and associated rider arm operates to rock shaft 158 to raise and lower the pressure roller in relation to the feed roller 146. This mechanism raises the pressure roller to' permit the feed shoe to move the front edge of a sheet on to the feed. roller 146, and then position along the bar 161 and clamped thereto by clamping screw 162. By this arrangement, the guide bars may be moved to any position to accommodate therebetween sheets of various widths.

A sheet receiving tray 163 fragmentarily shown in Fig. 7 rests upon the base member 1. The tray may be provided with a hook element 164 adapted to engage a rod 165 secured to the side frames 2 and 3, thus holding the tray in position to receive the stenciled sheets ejected from the duplicating drum.

The operation of the machine will now be described. A stack of sheets is placed u on the table platform. Sliding plate 38 is t en moved into abutment against one end of the sheet pile, the other end of the sheet pile abutting against the wall members 33. Guide bars 159 are then moved into abutment against the sides of the sheet pile. All the sheets are now retained in a "ertical stack or pile, as shown in Fig. 3. Hand lever 30 is then manipulated to raise the platform until the top of the sheet pile is raised to the approximate proper feeding level.

The entire sheet feeding mechanism and stenciling mechanism is driven by the turning of crank arm 5 or a motor (not shown?g in place thereof. With the turning of cran arm 5 the table raising pawl 109 is reciprocated by the train of mechanism heretofore described. The stroke or the distance traveled by one reciprocation of the -pawl member 109 is preferably slight so that the 1 each stroke.

table is raised a very small amount only at Pawl member 109 is pressed forwardly into engagement with the ratchet segment against the action of spring element .115 by rider arm 121 until the top of the sheet pile has been raised sufiiciently to lift the bar member 92, carrying projecting element 118, a 'slight amount, suflicientto move adjustable rider arm 121 out of pressing contact against the pawl member. The pawl member then swings awa from the ratchet segment and idles out o operative contact therewith.

The cycle of movements of the feed shoe is diagrammatically represented for purposes of illustration in Fig. 23. Horizontal bar members 50 and channel supports 45 carrying the feed shoe'are each operatively connected to the rotating shaft 11 of the machine by a train of mechanism heretofore described. The various movements of bar members and channel members are so synchronized as to move the feed shoe along the path and in the direction of the arrows shown in the diagram. In one position the feed shoe moves horizontally along path A above the sheet pile, accomplished by the forward reciprocation of bar members 50. Channel members 45then come into play to. lower the feed shoe into contact with the sheet pile, the rearward reciprocation of bar members still continuing. During this movement the feed shoe travels along the path B shown in the diagram. The feed shoe is thus moved into resting position upon the sheet pile. The resting pressure of the feed shoe on the sheet pile may be varied by adjusting the pressure latch 82, as heretofore described.

The feed shoe shown in Fig. 4 is approaching the end of the B movement described. The 'bar members continue to reciprocate rearwardly, moving the shoe horizontally along path C. During this movement the top sheet is gripped by the feed shoe and buckled between it and the abutment plate 38 as shown in Figs. 3 and 5. The bar members then reverse their reciprocating direction, carrying the feed. shoe horizontally along path D. During this movement the During this movement the feed shoe travelsalong path E, as is shown in Fig. 6. The feed shoe moves through a complete cycle during each revolution of the stencil duplicating drum and for the feeding of each sheet. I

As the feed shoetravels over the path B,

cam member 98 comes into play to lift the bar members 92 and move the lip portions 95 off thesheet pile, as shown in Fig. 4. The front edge of the top sheet is now free to be 'withdrawn from under the-lip portions as the feed shoe moves over the path C. As the feed shoe approaches the end of its path C, cam member 98 has been rotated to such a position as to permit the bar members 92 to be lowered by the action of coil s rings 93 until the lip portions rest with resihent pressure on the top of the remaining sheets of the stack, as shown in Fig. 5. These remaining sheets are now clamped against movement and the front edge of the sheet pile is generally compressed. This clamping action not only holds the remaining sheets against movement as the top sheet is manipulated rearwardly and forwardly by the feed shoe, but in some manner operates to destroy the cohesion between the remaining sheets of the stack so that when the next successive top sheet is gripped by the feed shoe it separates readily from the remaining sheets of the stack. The theory of this separation is that the properties and size of the rubber sponge .afl'ord sutficient adhesion to buckle the top sheet without slipping over its surface and the pressure put on the sponge is insufficient to create enough friction to cause other sheets to buckle materially. It is a factthat with my feeding a paratus more than one sheet is seldom fed fiom the sheet stack at one time, andwhen that occurs, it can be traced to some improper adjustment of the 'parts.

a When a very few sheets have been fed from the sheet pile the bar member carrying the operative projecting element 118 is lowered sufliciently to move adjustable rider arm 121 into pressing engagement against cam element 123 to swing the reciprocating pawl 109 into operative engagement with the ratchet segment. The table platform is then raised by very gradual degrees until the lip ele-

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2660113 *Nov 27, 1946Nov 24, 1953Ditto IncRotary offset duplicator
US3210071 *May 1, 1963Oct 5, 1965Dick Co AbSheet feeding mechanism having corner and center separators
US3521560 *Oct 20, 1966Jul 21, 1970Addressograph MultigraphLithographic printing
US4928947 *Nov 17, 1988May 29, 1990The Mead CorporationSheet feeders for soft coated sheet material
US4932646 *Nov 17, 1988Jun 12, 1990The Mead CorporationSheet feeders for soft coated sheet material
WO1989004804A1 *Nov 23, 1988Jun 1, 1989The Mead CorporationSheet feeders for soft coated sheet material
Classifications
U.S. Classification271/25
International ClassificationB65H1/04, B65H3/54, B65H3/02
Cooperative ClassificationB65H2801/21, B65H3/02, B65H3/54, B65H1/04
European ClassificationB65H3/54, B65H3/02, B65H1/04