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Publication numberUS1844607 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 9, 1932
Filing dateMay 7, 1929
Priority dateJan 19, 1929
Publication numberUS 1844607 A, US 1844607A, US-A-1844607, US1844607 A, US1844607A
InventorsSikorsky Igor
Original AssigneeSikorsky Aviat Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Aircraft, including pedals for same
US 1844607 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Feb. 9, 1932.

AIRCRAFT, INCLUDING PEDALS FOR SAME Original Filed Jan; 19. 1929 3 Sheets-Sheet l ATTORNEY I. SIKORSKY Feb. 9 1932.

INCLUDING PEDALS FOR SAME AIRCRAFT,

Original Filed Jan. 19, 1929 3 Sheets-Sheet 2 INVENTOR M f ATTORNEY Feb. 9, 1932. l. SIKORSKY 1,844,607

I AIRCRAFT, INCLUDING PEDALS FOR SAME I Original Fiied Jan. 19, 1929 s Sheets-Sheet s .M/ A ORNEY Patented Feb.9, 1932 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE IGOR SIKORSKY, OF COLLEGE POINT, NEW YORK, ASSIGNOR TO SIKORSKY AVIATION CORPORATION, OF WILMINGTON, DELAWARE, A

CORPORATION OF AIRCRAFT, IN GLUDING PEDALS FOR SAME Original application filed January 19, 1929, Serial No. 333,603. Divided and this application filed May 7,

1929. Serial No. 361,178.

The present invention relates to foot control systems of aircraft of all kinds. It hasparticular reference to the form and mounting of the pedals themselves and likewise to a dual control system according to which the pilots sit side by side. In this latter connection, the invention relates to means whereby either of two sets of pedals may be operatively connected with transmission members to which are secured cables or the like leading to the rudder.

This application is a division of my copending application Serial No. 333,603 filed January 19, 1929.

In the accompanying drawings, the invention has been shown as'appli ed to an amphibion as shown in the above mentioned application. As stated above, however,the invention may be applied equally well to other types of aircraft, the present showing as a whole being intended to be merely illustrative of the invention and in no wise restrictive.

In the drawings:

Figure 1 is an elevation of a portion of an amphibion showing particularly the body boa-t thereof, part of the side wall of the latter being broken away.

Figure 2 is a transverse section of the bodyboat at the front of the pilots compartment.

Figure 3 is a plan view of the dual set of pedals.

Figure 4 shows the left hand set of pedals in elevation.

Figure 5 is a section on line 55 of Figure 4.

Figure 6 is a section on line 6-6 of Figure ,4.

Figure 7 is ure 4.

Figure 8 is a side elevation of the transmission members, shown as segments to which the rudder control cables are secured, and

Fi ure 9 is a rear elevation of the same mem rs and associated instrumentalities.

Referring to the drawings, 10 indicates the body-boat of the amphibion in the forward a section on line 77 of Fig- 1 portion of which is arranged a pilots compartment 11 provided with seats 12 and 13.

placed side by side- The reference numeral 14 indicates the upper main plane and 15 designates the-lower plane. The empennage shown in Figure 1 at 16. Retractible landin wheels 17 are provided, these being controlled by mechanism fully described in my copending applications Serial No. 314,585 filed October 24, 1928 and Serial No. 333,603, filed January 19, 1929.

Other features with which the present invention is not particularly concerned are the centrally disposed engine controls 18, stabilizer controls 19 and aileron and elevator control stick 20. As described in the parent ap plication, the control stick 20 has pivoted to the upper end thereof an arm 21 which supports a wheel 22, the arm being swingable in front of either seat 12 or 13 as circumstances may require. 7

The two sets of pedals are identical and consequently only one need be particularly described. Reference will accordingly be had to the set in front of the left hand seat 13, the two pedals being designated as 23 and 24. Each pedal is in the form of what may be termed a runner and has a rear horizontally extending portion and a forwardupwardly inclined portion provided with a heel cleat as at 25. Each runner comprises a pair of longitudinally extending U-section spar members 26 and 27, these being reinforced at theangle by members 28 riveted in the channels.

. A metal plate 29 is supported on members 26 and 27 and extends throughout the length of the runner and a layer of some suitable nonslippery material 30 is superposed on plate 29.

31 are guided in U-section tracks-L33.

In order to prevent vertical displacement of the rear or horizontal portion of the pedal, a longitudinally extending I-beam 34 is secured to the under surface of plate 29, the lower flange being ust clear of the floor and taking under overhanging flanges of parallel Z-bars 35 and 36. I

The forward end of each pedal is supported on a normally vertically extending stirruplike lever comprising side members 37 and 38 and a cross bar 39. Each lever is mounted on an axle 40 extending transversely of the machine and mountedin pedestals 41 and 42, all of the axles lying in the same line. The forward extremities of members 26 and 27 are provided on their lower sides with recesses adapted to receive a bar 39, accidental displacement of members 26 and 27 relative to the bar being prevented by plates 43 and 44.

It will be seen that the runners thus mounted may be reciprocated in substantially horizontal planes and are supported for such movement on the forward levers and the rearward rollers. Ordinarily, the pilot will rest his feet on the inclined portion of the pedal, although if a change of position is desired they may rest on the horizontal portion. If a pilot wishes to remove his feet from the pedals entirely, when the machine is under the control of the other pilot, a cover member 45 is provided which is slidable in guides 46 and 47 and may be drawn out so as to substantially cover the horizontal portions of the runners. At its forward end, the cover plate is provided with a hand slot 45.

Stirrup-like members 37 and 38 which support runner 23 are provided with forwardly extending lugs as at 46 (Figure 4), these lugs supporting a pin 47-parallel to pin 40. Pin 46 projects beyond member 38 into a recess formed in an arm 48, which likewise extends parallel to the pivoting axis of all the levers and has a rearwardly extending lug 48 in an aperture of which is engaged the projecting end of pin 40 upon which the supporting lever for runner 24 is mounted. Members 37 and 38' of this lever have rearwardly extending lugs 46' at their lower portions which support a pin 47. Pins 47 and 47' are equally spaced from the pivotal axis of the levers and upon rocking movement of the latter travel in arcs of the same circle.

Arm 48 supports at its end a coaxial pin 49, this pin terminating in the same longitudinal plane of the body-boat as pin 47.

Disposed centrally of the pilots compartment opposite pins 47 and 49, is a substantially square frame comprising four marginal strips which support at their points of junction, that is, at the corners of the square, pedestals 50, 51, 52 and 53. The frame is guided for shifting movements transversely of the compartment by Z-bars 54 and 55. Pedestals 50 and 51 are provided with vertical grooves in which is movable a-slide 56 which is provided with a horizontal slot 56. Headed ferrules 57 and 58 are slidable on the ends of ins 49 and 47 respectively, the flanges of these ferrules overlying the margins of slot 56' as is indicated in Figure 9 in particular.

It will be obvious from the above description that upon moving runner 23 forwardly and runner 24 rearwardly equal distances, pins 49 and 47 will move downwardly through equal arcs and that ferrules 57 and 58 which slide in slot 56 will inforce a downward movement of slide 56. Since the movement of pins 49 and 47 is balanced, slide 56 will move in strictly horizontal planes and there will be no tendency to jam it in its guides.

Disposed centrally of the slide frame are a pair of standards 59 and 60 which through the intermediary of pin 61, in line with the pivoting axis of the pedal supporting levers, supports a pair of segments 62 and 63. Segment 62 has a transversely extending portion 62 which at its ends supports pins 64 and 65 at an equal distance from the pivotal axis of the stirrup levers to that of pin 49. Segment 63 likewise has a transverse portion supporting pins 66 and 67 adapted to oscillate in the same are as pin 47'. Springs 68 and 69 normally pull the segments forwardly and to the latter are attached the rudder control cables 70 and 71.

As has been mentioned above, the pedal arrangement at the right hand side is identical with that at the left, this assembly presenting pins 7 and 73 rockable in arcs of the same circle as pins 49 and 47. These pins have slidable thereon coupling ferrules 74 and 75 guided in a slot of a slide 76 which in turn is guided in grooves in pedestals 52 and 53. 1

It has been stated that this supporting frame for slides 56 and 76 is displaceable transversely of the machine. At its left hand limit of movement, as illustrated in Figure 3, ferrules 74 and 75 which ride on pins 72 and 73 are brought over the ends of pins 65 and 67, While ferrules 57 and 58 will be free of pins 64 and 66. Under these circumstances, pins 65 and 67 are forced to follow the movements of slide 76. Inasmuch as these pins are on different sides of supporting pin 60, a downward movement, for example, will impart forward movement to segment 62 and an equal rearward movement to segment 63. Thus to sum up the sequence of operations, sliding movements of the pedals cause oscillations of pins 72 and 73 which in turn cause vertical reciprocatory movements of slide 76 thus oscillating pins 65 and 67 and imp arting opposite oscillatory movements to transmission members 62 and 63. Equal movement of the segments will be inforced due to the fact that cables 70 and 71 are connected in the usual manner to the cross bar of the vertical rudder. Since this manner of connection is Well understood, it has not been thought necessary to illustrate it in the drawings.

Under the circumstances above described the machine has been assumed to be under the control of the pilot sitting at the right. If the control is to be changed, it is only necessary pins 64 and 66 while ferrules 74 and 75 will be moved out of engagement with pins and 67. This movement is under the control of either of the-"pilots.

Mounted on the compartment floor immediately to the rear of the coupling frame are a pair of transversely spaced segments 77 and 78 to which are pivoted levers 79 and 80. Each of these levers has at its lower extremity a pin shown at 81 (Figures 4, 8 and 9), this pin engaging in. a vertical slot of a pedestal 51 or 52. Each lever has a spring pressed plunger as at 7 9 and 7 8', these being adapted to cooperate with a pair ofspaced serrations on the respective segments. The plungers do not positively lock the levers against movement, but at the same time are adequate to hold the coupling frame in either of its coupling positions. Movement of lever 79 by the pilot at the left, however, will inforce movement of lever 80, without manipulation of the latter by the pilot at the right. It willbe understood that with the levers in the position shown in Figure 9, the pilot at the right will be-in control of the vertical rudder, while movement of the levers to the left to their other limit position will place the rudder under the control of the pilot at the left, freeing it entirely from the control of the other pllot.

While I have described an embod mentof my invention with some particularity, 1t is to be understood that I do not limit myself with respect to structure, except s determined in the following claims.

' I claim 1. A control pedal for aircraft comprising ahorizontally reciprocable runner, said run-- ner having a substantially horizontal portion and an upwardly inclined end portion.

2. In an aircraft, a control pedal, comprlsing a horizontally reciprocable runner, and cover means adapted to be disposed over the runner or to be displaced toexpose the runner.

3. In an aircraft, a control pedal comprising a horizontally reciprocable runner having a substantially horizontal portion and upwardly inclinedend portion, and means connecting the said end portion with mechanism to be controlled.

4. In an aircraft, a control pedal comprising a horizontally reciprocable runner, roller means supporting one end of said runner, and an operating lever supporting the other end of said runner.

5. In an aircraft, a control pedal comprising a horizontally reciprocable runner having a substantially horizontal portion and an upwardly inclined forward portion, roller means supporting said horizontal portion and an upwardly extending actuating lever supporting the forward end of said forward portion.

6. In an aircraft, a control pedal comprising a horizontally'reciprocable runner, roller means supporting one end of said runner, an

operating lever supporting the other end of said runner, and means preventing vertical displacement of said runner.

7. In an aircraft, control means including a reciprocable slide, a pair of transmission members oscillable about a common axis and means to oscillate said transmission members in opposite directions in dependence upon movement of said slide in a single direction.

8. In an aircraft, control means including a pair of reciprocable slides, a pair of oscillable transmission members, and means for connecting either of said slides to said members whereby the latter will be oscillated in opposite directions upon a movement of the connected slide in a single direction.

9. In an aircraft, control means including an oscillable transmission member, a pair of reciprocable slides, one disposed at each side of said member, a commonframe supporting said slides, means adaptedto selectively connect either of said slides with said member, whereby said member will be oscillated in dependence upon reciprocatory movements of the connected slide, and means to shift said fr'ame bodily to selectively connect the 9 slides,

10. In an aircraft, control mechanism iricluding a pair of levers mounted on a common axis extending transversely of the aircraft, one of said levers having a forward extension and-the other a rearward extension, a pin on each extension projecting parallel to the leveraxis, and a vertically reciprocable slide horizontally slotted to receive said pins.

11. In an aircraft, control mechanism including a pair of levers mounted on a common axis extending transversely of the air- 1 craft, one of said levers having a forward extens1on and the other a rearward extens1o n, a pin on each extension pro ecting parallel to the lever axis, a vertically reciprocable slide horizontally slotted to receive said pins, and a coupling ferrule slidable oneach of said pins.

12. In an aircraft, control mechanism including a pair of levers mounted on a common axis extending transversely of the aircraft, one of said levers having a forward extension and the other a rearward extension, a pin on each extension projecting parallel to the lever axis, a coupling ferrule slidable on each of said pins and a vertically reciprocable slide horizontally slotted to re-' ceive and guide the ferrules.

13. In an aircraft, control mechanism in cluding a pair of levers mounted on a common axis extending transversely of the aircraft, one of said levers having a forward extension and the other a rearward extension, a pin on each arm extending parallel to the lever axis, a pair of segments pivotal about the axial line of said levers, one of said segments supporting a pin forward of its axis and parallel thereto and the other of said segments supporting a pin to the rear of its axis and parallel thereto, and coupling rings for the first named pins and the segment pins.

14. In an aircraft, control mechanism including a pair of levers mounted on a common axis extending transversely of the aircraft, oneof said levers having a forward extension and the other a rearward extension, a pin on each arm extending parallel to the lever axis, a pair of segments pivotal about the axial line of said levers, one of said segments supporting a pin forward of its axis and parallel thereto and the other of said segments supporting a pin to the rear of its axis and parallel thereto, coupling rings for the first named pins and the segment pins, and a vertically reciprocable slide horizontally slotted to receive and guide the rings.

15. In an aircraft, control mechanism including a pair of levers mounted on a common axis extending transversely of the aircraft, one of said levers having a forward extension and the other a rearward extension, a pin on each extension projecting parallel to the lever axis, a vertically reciprocable slide horizontally slotted to receive said I pins, a coupling ferrule slidable on each of said pins, and means to slide the ferrules simultaneously.

16. In an aircraft, two sets of foot actuated control levers arranged side by side, a movement transmitting member disposed between said levers, and selectively operable connections between the sets of levers and said member.

17. In an aircraft, two sets of horizontally reciprocable foot actuated runners, a movement transmitting member disposed between said runners, levers supporting the forward ends of said runners and oscillable upon reciprocation of the runners, and selectively operable connections between the levers of each set of runners and said transmitting member.

18. "In an aircraft, an actuating lever, a pair of transmitting members oscillable coaxially with said lever, and connections between said lever and members whereby movement of the lever in a single direction is adapted to cause oscillation of said mem bers in opposite directions.

Signed at College Point, Long Island, in the county of Queens and State of New York, this 27th day of March, A. D. 1929.

IGOR SIKORSKY..

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2478882 *Dec 13, 1944Aug 9, 1949Boeing CoLinear movement rudder pedal and linkage
US2574916 *May 2, 1946Nov 13, 1951Gordon Lawrence WrightAircraft control apparatus
US2638290 *Feb 9, 1949May 12, 1953SncaseControl means for flying machines
US2998211 *Jun 2, 1959Aug 29, 1961Douglas J EvansRudder control system for aircraft
US3164031 *May 3, 1961Jan 5, 1965Rubissow George ALink system for an accelerator pedal
US4403756 *Dec 22, 1980Sep 13, 1983The Boeing CompanyBifurcated feel simulator for aircraft
US5056742 *Oct 6, 1989Oct 15, 1991The Boeing CompanyModular rudder pedal and brake control assembly for aircraft
US6918316Mar 5, 2002Jul 19, 2005Technology Holding CompanyAdjustable pedal assembly
US7690604 *Mar 20, 2007Apr 6, 2010Honeywell International Inc.Rudder pedal assembly including non-parallel slide rails
US20020092374 *Mar 5, 2002Jul 18, 2002Mattias JohanssonAdjustable pedal assembly
US20080105790 *Mar 20, 2007May 8, 2008Honeywell International, Inc.Rudder pedal assembly including non-parallel slide rails
Classifications
U.S. Classification244/229, 244/235, 74/512
International ClassificationB64C13/24
Cooperative ClassificationB64D2011/0606, B64C13/24
European ClassificationB64C13/24