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Publication numberUS1844885 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 9, 1932
Filing dateJul 26, 1930
Priority dateJul 26, 1930
Publication numberUS 1844885 A, US 1844885A, US-A-1844885, US1844885 A, US1844885A
InventorsLeo Harris
Original AssigneeProfessional Shoe Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Ballet slipper and method of making the same
US 1844885 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Feb. 9, 1932. L. HARRIS 44,

BALLET SLIPPER AND METHOD OF IAKING THE- SAIE Filed July 26, 1930 v flarri s. v

Patented Feb. 9, 1932 UNITED STATES PATENT" OFFICE Y LEO HARRIS, OF GHIC AGQQILLINOIS, ASSIGNOB TO PROFESSIONAL SHOE CORPORATION,

OF CHICAGO, ILLINOIS,'A CORYORATION OF ILLINOIS BALLET SLIPPERAND METHOD MAKING THE SAME Application filed July 26,

This invention relates to ballet slippers, and method of making the same, with particular reference to slippers having elastic =means in the upper portion so that the slippers will at all times snugly fit the feet of the wearer.

It is a recognized fact that in the act of tee dancing the feet ofthe dancer frequently arch when on the 'toes'. Such. arching shortens the distancebetween thetoes and the heels with the result thatif the ballet slipper fits the foot snugly when the ball of the foot is on the floor, then when the dancer is on her toes the heel portion of the slipper bulges from the heel of the foot leaving a gap, presenting an unsightly appearance,- and sometimes a portion of the heel of the slipper sags. I

l The slipper of the present invention overcomes the above recitedobjections in that it provides an elastic portion at the heel to compensate for varations in the length of the feet .of the wearer-when fiat on the floor .or on the toes during the toe dancing act whereby the slipper fits snugly at all times without gapping-and without losing its shape. I p

An object of the present invention isto provide a ballet slipper with meansfor causing the slipper to fit the wearers foot snugly inall positionsof use. 7

Another ob 'ect of the invention is to provide a method of making a ballet slipper so that the resulting slipper'will snugly fit the wearers foot at all times.

A still further object of the invention is to provide a ballet slipper with elastic inserts :at the heels to compensatefor variations in the movements and shape of the footof the wearer in toe dancing. I

A stillfurther object of the invention is to improve ballet slippers so that the same will snugly fit the feet of the wearer at all times and at the same time provide comfort in all positions.

The slipper includes an elastic portion adjacentthe heel of the slipperwhich allows the movements of the material of the upper as the footof the wearer changes its shape and position in the act of toe dancing. The

methodiincludes the insertion of an elastic 1930. 15am No. 470,aa9.

material between spaced ends of an'upper;

the disposition of a lining material underlying the elastic material so that the upper may be stretched on a last and then after the upper has been lasted such portionof the lining underlying the elastic portion is cut away to allow movement'of the upper. 1

An embodiment of the invention is illustrated in the accompanying drawings and the views thereof areas follows: Figure l is a side elevational view of a slipper embodying the present invention showing the same on the foot of a dancer with the same in toe dancing position. I Figure 2 isa side elevational view of a slipper embodying the present invention shown on the foot of a wearer with the foot flatwise-on the floor. i i f 7 Figure 3 is an elevational view of the rear end of the slipper. I Figure 4 is an enlarged sectional view taken in the plane of line IV'IV of Figure 3. p The drawings will now be explained; The form-of slipper chosen to exemplify the present invention is illustrated as comprising a a sole 1, a toe portion 2, and a heel portion 3-. The toe and heel portions 2 and 3 constitute the upper and are made in the usual manner except as to the heel construction. a i

The-ends 4 and 5 of the'upper material adjacentfthe heel are "cutaway to providea space. Figure 3 illustrates the space so formed as extending each side from the middle'lineof the back stay 6. The back stay in this instance consists of a narrow stripof 'whichthe upper is made, preferably satin, which at its upper end is secured to a finishing strip 7 sewed along the upper margin of the upper. The lower end of the back stay 6 is attached to the sole 1;in the same manner as the balance of the upper is attached to the sole or last.

A piece of elastic material has itscentral portion stitched to the back stay 6 and its margins to the adjacent margins of the ends of the upper of the heel, providing the elastic gores 8 and 9 between the back'sta-y 6 and the adjacent spaced ends of the-upper. The elastic materialust described may be inserted in-two pieces or'as a unitarypiece, as'described the margins of the two pieces would be stitched to the margins i and 5 of the upper and to the margins of the back stay 6. Figure 4 illustrates a single piece of elastic material stitched in the manner just described.

The upper is constructed usually of an outer la er of finished material and a lining 11 stitched together at the top margins thereof and covered by the binding strip 7.

The lining material is applied to the upper of the present invention underlying the elastic material making the lining continuous throughout the interior of the outer layer 10 in the usual manner. This is for the purpose of stretching the upper on the last as con siderable force is necessary to properly fit the upper for attachment to the last and oftentimes the operator uses pliers or similar tools for stretching the upper on the last. The arrangement of the lining underlying the elastic material therefor prevents the elastic material from stretching during the lasting operation. As soon as the upper has been properly lasted and removed therefrom portions of the lining material underlying the elastic material is cut away allowing the elastic material to function when the slipper is applied to the foot of the dancer.

The upper is illustrated as comprising two parts, a toe portion 2 and the heel portion 3 as before stated which portions are stitched to ether along seam 12.

he utilization of the back stay 6 maintains the heel portion of the slipper in proper form so that there is no sagging of the heel portion of the slipper when the dancer is on her toes as illustrated in Figure 1. The back stay 6 also adds to the appearance of the slipper and at a distance it is impossible to discern the utilization of the elastic inserts or ores 8 and 9.

ballet slipper must snugly fit the foot of the wearer. Should the slipper be fitted snugly to the foot with the foot on the floor as shown in Figure 2, then when the dancer is on her toes the foot curves thus shortening the distance between the toes and the heel of the same decreasing the space occupied at the heel of the slipper. Ordinarily such shortening of the foot causes the heel of the slipper to sag or to lie away from the heel of the dancer making the slipper uncomfortable and unsightly.

The slipper embodying the present invention may be fitted to the foot of a dancer as shown in Figure 2, in which event the elastic gores 8 and 9 or a single gore, of one, instead of two, he used, causes snug fit of the shoe or slipper and at the same time allowing a comfortable fit, and when the dancer is on her toes in the position of Figure 1, the elastic will then contract causing snug fit 0f the heel of the slipper to the foot of the dancer and preventing any spacing between the heel of the slipper and the foot and preventing any sagging of the heel of the slipper.

If the foot is placed flatwise on the floor it necessarily spreads to some extent, consequently a ballet slipper fitted to a foot in this sition will be too large when the dancer is on her toes as the foot necessarily becomes shortened as above described. Furthermore, during toe dancing the foot contracts sideways so that a sli per which is comfortable when the foot is atwise on the floor would be too large and would lie away from the foot or sag. The slipper of the present invention prevents all of these disadvantages and overcomes these objections in that it causes the slipper to fit the foot snugly in all positions of toe dancin as well as when the dancer is walking wit her feet on the floor. The elastic is of such size and resiliency as to allow a spread of the slipper when the dancer is walking with her soles on the floor and in a position to contract the slipper when the dancer is on her toes.

Figure 4 illustrates an arrangement of the illustrated embodiment of the invention with the ends of the lining turned back and stitched to the back stay 6 and the white spaces indicates the portion of the lining cut. out after the upper has been lasted. Spaces between the inturned ends of the lining 11 and the lining 11 proper allow full resilient action of the elastic material or gore after the shoe has been completed.

The gist of the invention resides in the provision of an elastic insert or gore in a ballet slipper to allow the slipper to conform to spreading and contracting of the feet of the dancer in the various positions assumed in the act of toe dancing. The method involves the manner of inserting resilient or elastic material in a ballet slipper and the provision of a lining which prevents stretch of the elastc material while the upper is being lasted and then with the lining cut away underlying the elastic material in the slipner.

The invention has been described herein more or less precisely as to details at it is to be understood that changes may e made in the arrangement and roportion of parts and that equivalents may substituted without departing from the spirit and scope of the invention.

The invention is claimed as follows:

1. A method of making ballet slippers which consist in inserting elastic material in a slipper connected to spaced portions of the slipper, inserting an upper lining with the same underlying the elastic material, then applying the upper to a last and utilizing the unbroken lining for allowing stretching of the upper to the last, and then after the upper has been lasted removing such portions of the lining as underlie the elastic material.

2. The method of making a ballet slipper which consists in spacing the ends of the upper adjacent the heel, inserting elastic material between the spaced ends of the up per, and applying an inner lining underlying the elastic material for preventing stretch of the elastic material duringlasting.

3. The method of making a balletslipper which includes the formation ofan upper with the ends of the upper adjacent the ends of the heels in spaced relation, inserting an elastic material between the spaced ends of the upper, then applying an inner lining to the upper extending underneath the elastic material, then applying the upper to a last utilizing the lining for preventing stretch of the elastic material while lasting said upper, and then cutting away the lining underneath the elastic material.

4. The method of making ballet slippers; which consists in forming the upper with portions thereofin spaced relation, inserting elastic material to bridge said space, then applying an inner lining underneath the elastic material, then lasting the upper and utilizing the lining for preventing stretch of the elastic material while lasting the upper, and then removing the lining underlying the elastic material.

5, A ballet slipper including an upper having an unbroken top margin, the adjacent rear ends of the rear portions ofthe upper being joined together at the top margin and spaced from each other below said top margin, the spaced ends extending to the slipper sole, and elastic material connecting said spaced rear ends and filling the space between the same and the top margin and sole.

In testimony whereof I have hereunto subscribed my name at Chicago, Cook County, 7

Illinois.

LEO HARRIS.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4519148 *Jul 18, 1983May 28, 1985Sisco Jann LExercise shoe
US5142797 *Aug 12, 1991Sep 1, 1992Cole Iii Charles DShoe employing negative toe rocker for foot muscle intensive sports
US5191726 *Apr 30, 1992Mar 9, 1993RepettoAsymmetric ballet shoe and pair of such shoes
US6471219Mar 21, 2000Oct 29, 2002Benetton Sportsystem Usa, Inc.Adjustable fit in-line skate
US6588771Jun 11, 2002Jul 8, 2003Benetton Sportsystem Usa, Inc.Adjustable fit in-line skate
US7051458May 28, 2004May 30, 2006Laduca Phillip FHigh-heeled jazz dancing and character dancing shoe
US7730634Mar 15, 2006Jun 8, 2010Laduca Phillip FHigh-heeled jazz dancing and character dancing shoe
EP1428445A1 *Oct 15, 2003Jun 16, 2004Salomon S.A.Article of footwear, in particular for rock climbing
WO1991001659A1 *Aug 10, 1990Feb 21, 1991Cole Charles DShoe employing negative toe rocker for foot muscle intensive sports
WO2008087145A1 *Jan 15, 2008Jul 24, 2008Matarredona Vicente GarciaUpper for footwear with improved elasticity
Classifications
U.S. Classification36/8.3, 36/113, 12/142.00R, 36/51
International ClassificationA43B5/00, A43B5/12
Cooperative ClassificationA43B5/12
European ClassificationA43B5/12