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Publication numberUS1845511 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 16, 1932
Filing dateNov 26, 1928
Priority dateNov 26, 1928
Publication numberUS 1845511 A, US 1845511A, US-A-1845511, US1845511 A, US1845511A
InventorsNeal Elmer E
Original AssigneePeerless Handcuff Company
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Handcuff
US 1845511 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Feb. 16, 1932. NEAL 1,845,511

HANDCUFF Filed Nov. 26, 1928 INVENTOR. BY an. a M

A TTORNEYS.

Patented Feb. 16, 1932 PT FFIC ELMEE E. NEAL, OF NEW HAVEN, CONNECTICUT, ASSIG-NOR 'IO PEERLESS'I-IANIOCUFF COMPANY, OF SPRIlsl'G-FEELD, MASSACHUSETTS, A GOE-PORATEION OF MASSACHUSETTS HANDCUFF Application filed lTovember 26, 1928. Serial No. 321,903.

This invention relates to policemens cuifs, such as thumb, leg and handcuffs adapted for police use. Broadly speaking, the object of the invention is a handculf combining strength with a degree of lightness and refinement of outline which greatly reduces its undesirable bulk and weight when carried in a policemans pocket. In furtherance of this object 1 have devised a handcufl' having a lock chamber of very small dimensions, corresponding in magnitude to the other portions of the cuff so that there is no unsightly and bulky bulge in the lock-containing portion. I have also devised a handcuf'f permitting the use of a single stationary pivotholding arm and combined with a lock mechanism that cooperates in the elimination of weig it, A further object of the invention is to produce a handcufi' which cannot be tampered with by the individual handcuffed, either alone or with the aid of a confederate. A further object is to produce a handcut't which cannot be leftin an inoperative position when-placed in the policemans pocket.

The manner in which these and other ob jects are attained will now be described with reference to the accompanying drawings, in which Fig. 1 is a plan view of a single handcuff constructed in accordance with my invention, it being understood that in ordinary use the cuff will be joined permanently by a'chain to another similar cuff;

Fig. 2 is a side elevation thereof;

Fig. Sis a transverse section through the out? when in locked position, taken on line 3 3 of Fig. 5;

Fig. i is a longitudinal section through the cuii, taken substantially on line 44 of Fig. 2, showing the parts in what will be referred to as the ratcheting position in which the end can be closed upon a persons wrist but cannot be opened;

Fig. 5 is a similar section showing the parts in the locked position, in which the swinging arm can be moved in neither direction;

Fi 6 is a similar section showing the parts in the unlocked position, in which the swinging arm can be moved freely in either direction;

Fig. 7 isa perspective view of the bolt;

Fig. 8 is a perspective view of the locking latch;

Fig. '9 is a detail ofthe key; and

Fig. 10 is a perspective view of a block which closes the lock chamber.

The handcuff isformed of two curved members, a relatively fixed arm 11 and a swinging arm 12 joined together by a pivot 13. The arm 11 is in this case sing'le, instead of being as in most prior constructions forked so as to embrace both sides of the arm 12. This makes a. lighter construction, made fea sible only by reason of the exceptionally com pact design of the lock chamber which preventsthe appearance of local bulkiness and avoids extreme concentration of weight at one point of the cuff. The lock member is formed by a curved side wall 14 and a top wall 15, both preferably integral with the arm ,11. The top wall 15 has a. rib 16 concentric with the pivot 13 and fitting snugly into a similarly concentric groove 17 in the movable arm 12 over the length of the'top F wall. This groove and rib construction prevents springing the arms apart, adds rigid ity to the cuff when locked, prevents disassembly of the locked parts even though the pivot 13 is removed, and prevents access being had to the lock chamber on that side.

It will be observed that the construction of the lock chamber as described permits it being cut from a" solid blank having a single cut through it on an are from end to end. of the chamber, blocks 18 and 19 are provided. Block 18 is held in place by a single -taper pin 20 passing through. a hole 21 in the block and preferably headed over and ground flush with the outside of the lock chamber after assembly, and by a notch 22 in the block fitting over a lug 23 formed integral with the side wall 14 of the lock chamher. With the arm 12 in locked position the block 18 cannot be removed even though the pin 20 be forced out, since the arm 12 pre-, vents the disengagement of the notch 22 from the lug 23. Block 19 is held bytwo taper pins 2 1, headed over and ground flush as in the previous case.

To close the otherwise open ends By the use of separable end blocks for the lock chamber a definite advantage, directly related to the protection of the lock against picking, is obtained. In previous handcufl' constructions it has been the practice to finish after assembly those surfaces of the ends of the lock chamber which are nearest the usual ratchet-toothed portion of the arm 12. This postponement of accurate sizing of the end surfaces has been necessit-ated by the conflict between the desire to have the smallest possible gap between the ends of the lock chamber and the ratchet teeth 25 and the practical impossibility of getting the requisite accuracy during the manufacture of the individual parts. By forming the end blocks separately they can be made in a series of sizes and the proper ones selected at the time of assembly without necessitating tting at this time.

The lock mechanism comprises but two moving parts, a bolt shown in Fig. 7 and a latch shown in Fig. 8. The bolt is formed by a curved plate 26 and a spring 27 per manently secured together, the plate having pins 28'and 29 cooperating with the latch as will be described and t is spring having a rolled end 30 fitting alternately into recesses 31 in the lower side of the latch 32. At one end of the plate 26 opposed pairs of recesses 33 are out to permit of the reciprocation thereof by teeth 34 formed upon the key 85. The key interacts wit the bolt somewhat after the manner of a pinion engaging rack, and accomplishes its various locking functions in a plurality of rotations. The bolt slides freely against the side wall 14, needing no further guiding members than the walls of the lock chamber.

The latch 32 is provided with a hole 36 through which passes a pivot pin 37 firmly riveted to the lock chamber and having its ends ground flush to prevent tampering. At one end the latch bears one or more teeth 38 cooperating with the latchet'teeth 25 on the movable arm 12, and opposite these teeth is beveled off as shown at 39 (Fig. 8). This beveled surface 39 coacts in certain positions of the mechanism with the beveled end 4-0 of the pin 28, will be described. The other end of the latch is cut away at 41, providing a slanting surface 42 cooperating with the outer end of the pin 29. A hole 43 is cut in the wall 15 to admit the key which, in order to render picking of the lock as diflicult as possible, is preferably made hollow so as to fit over a pin 44.

The operation of the locking mechanism will now be described. In Fig. 4 the handcuff is shown in what may be referred to as its normal position, having the teeth of the pawl 32 yieldingly engaging the ratchet teeth 25 so that the arm 12 may be rotated counterclockwise as viewed in 1 but cannot be rotated in the contrary direction. The

handculf can, in tais position, be placed on the prisoners wrist and adjusted to the proper size, where it will be held by the ratchet until, as is usually desirable, the handout)? is double lOClIQCl or bolted by means of the key. It will be observed that with the parts in the ratcheting position the rolled end 30 of the spring 27 is in the recess 31 nearest the end of the latch, pressing the latter yieldingly against the ratchet teeth 25. The pin 28 inactively in a recess 45 formed in the block 18. Pin 29 lies under the cut-away end 41 of the latch, preventing the latch being forced too far out by the spring in case the arm 12 is not in closed position, but otherwise imposing no restriction on its movement.

If new the key be inserted and rotated counterclockwise so that the engagement of its eeth with the recesses 33 will shift the bolt to the position of Fig. 5, the handculf will be double lcclzed or belted against movement of the arm 12 in either direction. The pin 28 underlies the toothed end of the latch, its motion into that position having been facilitated by the coaction of the slanting surfaces 39 and 40, and prevents the latch teeth from being withdrawn from the ratchet teeth pin 29 is still under the cut-away portion of the latch. Since the latch is held against longitudinal movement in the lock chamber by th pivot 37, the rolled end 30 of the spring is drawn out of the end recess 31 by the motion of the bolt, and snaps into the other recess. The key 35 may be withdrawn the lock with the parts in this position,

leaving the arm 12 securely held against movement in either direction.

When it desired to remove the handcufi from a prisoners wrist, whether the cuff be in the ratcheting or in the double locked or bolted position. the key is inserted and rotated clockwise. If the parts were in ratcheting position the key is rotated only a portion of a revolution, merely moving the bolt from the position of Fig. 4 to the limiting position of Fig. 6 i which the end of the bolt abuts the end of the rece s 15. If the parts were in locked position the key is rotated to carry "he bolt first to the ratcheting position of Fig. 4 and then to the unlocked position of Fig. 6. In the latter position the pin 29 has been forced under the slanting surface 42, causing the latch to tilt against the action of the spring until the teeth of the latch and the arm .12 are disengaged. The arm 12 can then be rotated freely in either direction. It might seem that with plate 26 in position shown in G that spring 2? operating on lever 32 would cam plate 26 back to the position of A i 4 by pressure on pin 29 from said spring pressed lever. ere are two ways to prevent First the key 35 might be held in the )osition shown in Fig. 6 until the arm 12 is drawn back and the prisoner released. But

the preferred way is to provide for sufficient friction between the bottom of plate 26 and the bottom inside wall of the lock casing that spring 27 is not strong enough to slide plate 26 under the conditions stated. Since the unlocking operation and the complete release of pawl lever is accomplished in a short length of time, it is only necessary to hold the parts in the positions shown in Fig. 6 long enough to draw arm 12 backwardly. It should be noted that with the parts in the unlocked position the key (Fig. 6) is in a position in which it cannotbe withdrawn from the keyhole. The bolt cannot be moved further to the left (as viewed in the figures) on account of its engagement with the block 18, and movement to the right sufiicient to permit withdrawal of the key places the lock in ratcheting position. This feature is of great utility in that it precludes any chance of an oilicer placing the handcuffs in his pocket'in unlocked position, or rather in position where the parts wouldpermit arm 12 to rotate in either direction, in whichpositionthehandcults would be useless for quick application to a prisoner. lVhen the handcuffs are removed from a arisoners wrists and the key removed, the handcufis are necessarily set for application to the next prisoner. Of course it is possible to double lock the handcuffs as in. position shown in Fig. 5, when the cuffs would not be in position to apply to a prisoner but there is no necessity or normal operation in which tile handcuffs are double locked except when they clasp a prisoners wrist. But it is extremely important to insure that the handcuils be carried in condition for immediate application to prisoners wrist and to guard.

against any carelessness in this respect which the described mechanism does.

The design of the lock partsmakes unnecessary any substantial depth of the lock chamber. Indeed, the dimensions of this chamber are kept within the same order of magnitude as the dimensions of the two arms 11 and 12. The uniformity of proportions thereby attained not only improves the appearance of the handcuff, but also renders it lighter and less bulky, so that it can more easily be kept in the oilicers pocket.

A further advantage of the long and shallow form of the lock chamber lies in the dithculty which would be experienced by the prisoner or a confederate in tampering with the chamber when the handcufi'" is in place on a prisoners wrist. Were the chamber deep, as in prior constructions, it would aiiord opportunity for the application of a hammer or other brute force methods to destroy it, but the nearness of all parts of the present handout; to the wrist renders such methods almost impossible without injury to the prisoner. A further feature of safety lies in the use of only one stationary arm 11 instead of a pair of parallel spaced arms as in prior constructions. Spaced parallel arms afiord opportunity for the insertion of a prying tool by which the lock chamber may be disrupted or the arms broken.

What I claim is:

1. A policemans cuff comprising two curved arms pivoted together, one of the arms bearing ratchet teeth and the otherarm hav ing a lock chamber, a latch pivoted within the lock chamber and having tooth means engaging the ratchet teeth on the first-mew tioned. arm, and a sliding bolt within the lock chamber formed with a part engaging the latch on one side of its pivot to tilt its toothed end away from the teeth on the arm and with a part engaging the latch on the other side of it pivot to positively prevent the toothed end of the latch from moving-out of engagement with the teeth on the arm. V y

2. A policemans cuff comprising two our ed arms pivoted together, one of the arms bearing ratchet teeth and the other arm having lock chamber, a latch pivoted within the lock chamber and having tooth means engaging the ratchet teeth on the first-mentioned arm, and a sliding bolt within the lock chamber formed with a part engaging the latch-on one side of its pivot to tilt its toothed end away from the teeth on the arm and with a part engaging the latch on the other side of its pivot to positivelyprevent the toothed end of the latch from moving out of engagement with the teeth on he arm, said bolt also carrying a spring pressing on the latch tending to press its teeth towards the toothed arm.

3. A policemans cuff comprising two curved arms pivoted together, one of the arms bearing ratchet teeth and the other arm having a lock chamber, a latch pivoted within the lockchamber and having tooth means enthe ratchet teeth on the first-mentioned arm, and a sliding bolt within the lock chamber formed with. a part engaging the latch on one side of its pivot to tilt its toothed end away from the teeth on the arm and with a part engaging the latch on the other side of its pivot to positively prevent the toothed I end of the latch from moving out of engagementwith the teeth on the arm, said bolt also carrying a spring engageable alternately in a plurality of recesses in the latch, whereby the latch is urged towards the toothed arm and the bolt held releasably against sliding movement.

4. A policemans cult comprising two curved arms pivoted together, one of the arms bearing ratchet teeth and the other arm having a lock chamber, a spring pressed latch pivoted within the lock chamber and having tooth means normally yieldingly engaging the ratchet teeth on the first mentioned arm, and a sliding bolt within the lock chamber having portions for engagement with a key and formed with a part engaging the latch on one side of its pivot when the bolt is in one position to tilt its toothed end away from the teeth on the arm and with a part engaging the latch on the other side of its pivot when the bolt is in anotner position to positively prevent the toothed end of the latch from moving out of engagementwith the teeth on the arm.

5. A policemans V cuff comprising two curved arms pivoted together, one of the arms bearing ratchet teeth and the other arm having a lock chamber, a spring-pressed latcn pivoted within the lock chamber and hav ng tooth 'ieans normally yieldingly engaging the ratchet teeth on the first-mentioned arm, asliding bolt within the lock chamber having portions for engagement with a key and formed with a part engaging the latch on one side of its pivot when the bolt is in one e):- treme position to tilt toothed end away from the teeth on the arm and with a part engaging the latch on the other side of its pivot when the bolt is in the other extreme position to positively prevent the toothed end of the latch from moving out of engagement with the teeth on the arm, said bolt having an intermediate position in which said parts do not impede ratcheting movement of the latch, a key pivot formed in the lock chamber, said bolt being he operable to its various positions from without the lock chamber.

6. A policemans cuff comprising two curved arms pivoted together, one of the arms bearing ratchet teeth and the other arm having a lock chamber, a latch p1voted w1th1n the lock chamber and having tooth means normally engaging the ratchet teeth on the first-mentioned arm, a sliding bolt withm the lock chamber having portions cut away to form rack-like teeth for engagement with a key, and formed with a part engaging the latch on one side of its pivot when the bolt is in one extreme position to tilt its toothed end away from the teeth on the other of its pivot and with a part when the bolt is in the other extreme position to positively prevent the toothed end of the latch from moving out of engagement with the teeth on the arm, said bolt having an intermediate position in w ich said parts do not impede ratcheting movement of the latch, a spring mounted on the bolt and bearing against the latch to press it yieldingly towards the ratchet teeth on the arm, a key pivot formed in the lock chamber, said bolt being operable by a key from without the lock chamber and from one position to another as desired.

7. A policemans cuff comprising two curved arms pivoted together, one of the arms bearing ratchet teeth and the other formed with an elongated integral enlargement opposite the pivot, said enlargement being open on the side towards the pivot and at its ends, but closed by integral walls on the other three sides to form a lock chamber, blocks closing the ends of the lock chamber, and locking mechanism within the chamber.

8. A policemans cull comprising two curved arms pivoted together, one of the arms bearing ratchet teeth and the other formed with an elongated integral enlargement opposite the pivot, said enlargement being open on the side towards the pivot and at its ends but closed by integral walls on the other three sides to form a lock chamber, blocks closing the ends of the lock chamber, at least one of said blocks having integral tongue and groove connection with an inte *ior wall of the chamber preventing removal of the block when the open side of the chamber is closed by the ratchet bearing arm, and locking mechanism within the chamber.

9. In a policemans cuff structure a lock casing comprising side, bottom, and end walls, one of said end walls and the bottom wall having integral mutually fitting portions forma recess in one wall and a projection in the other wall requiring said end wall to be moved at right angles to the bottom wall for assembly and removal to and from end closing position whereby when the top wall of the casing is closed said end wall cannot be removed, lock mechanism in said casing and locking arm for the handcuil movable to locking position where it forms the top wall of said lock casing.

19. in a policemans cufl structure in combination a single C-shaped arm, an elongated lock casing conforming in general contour to one end portion of the arm, said lock casing having an opening facing only the other end of the arm and a key hole, a second single Gshapec. arm reversely arranged with the first arm and pivoted to the latter at the end opposite the lock casing, said second arm having a lock engaging portion at the end opposite its pivoted end adapted to overlie the lock casing opening and to rotate past said opening, lock mechanism in said casing op erable to hold said second arm in overlying position to the lock casing when desired, whereby when locked on a wrist the handcufl structure presents no leverage for a tool to pry its structure apart and all parts of the lock casing lie so closely to the wrist that the casing cannot be struck heavy blows for its destruction without danger to the wrist.

In testimony whereof I have affixed my signature.

ELMER E. NEAL.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4287731 *Dec 7, 1979Sep 8, 1981Bangor Punta CorporationHandcuffs
US4574600 *Nov 2, 1983Mar 11, 1986Bangor Punta CorporationHandcuff and lock therefor
US4694666 *Nov 21, 1985Sep 22, 1987Chubb & Son's Lock And Safe Company LimitedShackle mechanisms
US5797284 *Jul 22, 1996Aug 25, 1998Lurie; Alan E.High security handcuffs
US6349574Aug 9, 2000Feb 26, 2002Alan E. LurieHigh security-restricted key retrofit kit for handcuffs and leg irons
US6568224Mar 5, 2002May 27, 2003William D. TaperOperating and locking mechanisms for handcuffs
US6619077 *Apr 5, 2002Sep 16, 2003James L. RobinsonLocking mechanism for restraints
US6684666Mar 21, 2003Feb 3, 2004William D. TaperOperating and locking mechanisms for handcuffs
US6978644Jan 28, 2004Dec 27, 2005Taper William DLocking mechanism for handcuffs
US7007518Dec 8, 2004Mar 7, 2006Taper William DHandcuffs
US7251964 *Dec 20, 2005Aug 7, 2007Smith & Wesson Corp.Double locking handcuffs
US8210006 *Jul 14, 2010Jul 3, 2012Csi-Penn Arms, LlcPick resistant handcuffs having central rail
US8356498Nov 22, 2011Jan 22, 2013Universal Tool CompanyDouble lock handcuff
US8683829Jun 5, 2013Apr 1, 2014Universal Tool CompanyDouble lock handcuff
US20110232338 *Jul 14, 2010Sep 29, 2011Wen-Sheng HuangPick resistant handcuffs having central rail
Classifications
U.S. Classification70/16
International ClassificationE05B75/00
Cooperative ClassificationE05B75/00
European ClassificationE05B75/00