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Publication numberUS1846683 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 23, 1932
Filing dateApr 19, 1929
Priority dateApr 19, 1929
Publication numberUS 1846683 A, US 1846683A, US-A-1846683, US1846683 A, US1846683A
InventorsGrant Hammond
Original AssigneeReclamation Company
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Deinking apparatus
US 1846683 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Feb. 23, G AMMO DEINKING APPARATUS Filed April- 19, 1929 2 Sheets$heet Al /V70? Kid/FAQ? G. HAMMOND Feb. 23, 1932.

DEINKING APPARATUS Fild April 19, 1929 2 Sheets-Sheet I wrnr lhia Patented Feb. 23, 1932 UNITED STATES PATENT. OFFICE GRANT HAMMOND, OF NEW HAVEN, CONNECTICUT, ASSIGNOR TO THE RECLAMATION COMPANY OF AMERICA, 0]? WILMINGTON, DELAWARE, A CORPORATION OF DELA- WARE DEIN KING APPARATUS Application filed April 19,

My invention relates to the class of machines that are employed for the purpose of cleaning and whitening printed paper by the removal of the printing ink therefrom, and an object of my invention, among others, is the production of a machine for such purpose that shall be simple in construction and of minimum size, by means of which the ink may be substantially entirely removed from masses of paper, requiring little labor and with a great saving in power as compared with the methods and machines heretofore commonly employed for deinking purposes.

One form of a machine embodying my invention and in the construction and use of which the objects herein set out, as well as others, may be attained, is illustrated in the accompanying drawings in which Figure 1 is a view in cross section substantially on a plane denoted by the dottedline 11 of Figure 2.

Figure 2 is a View in substantially longitudinal vertical section passing through the axis of the machine, but with some parts of the removed section shown to illustrate the construction.

Figure 3 is a plan view, scale enlarged, of a portion of a breaker bar and scraper illustrating the hinge connection of said scraper to the bar and also the spring for holding the bar in contact with the surface of the cylinder.

While my improved machine, illustrated and described herein, is adapted for use in connection with various methods for removing ink from printed papers, yet it will be understood that it is particularly adapted for use in connection with the process illustrated and described in my Patent No. 1.572.478, dated February 9, 1926, to which reference is made for a more thorough understanding of the use of the ingredients herein mentioned in a general way.

In the accompanying drawings the numeral 4 denotes the shell or casing of my improved machine that may be composed of any suitable material, preferably metal, and that is gener-' ally round in shape in cross section and that may be supported as by means of a saddle comprising end pieces 5 hollowed out to fit 1929. Serial No. 356,327.

and receive said shell near its ends. Heads 6, also preferably of metal, are formed to fit and close the ends of the shell, said heads being secured in any suitable manner, bolts passing ther-ethrough and through flanges 7 on the shell being shown herein for this purpose. Hubs 8 project outwardly from the central portions of the heads to serve as bearings for parts to be hereinafter described.

A breaker frame is rotatably supported in said hubs, said frame including a supporting sleeve 9 located at each end thereof and projecting through and beyond the hubs 8, arms 10 extending radially from each of said hubs and in such numbers as may be desired, and breaker bars 11 each secured at its opposite end to a pair of said arms oppositely arranged within the shell. These bars are preferably of angular shape in cross section, or are what may be termed of convexo-concave formation and are inclined so that the opposite longitudinal edges are positioned different distances from the axis of the breaker frame. A scraper 13 is pivotally attached to the bars in any suitable manner, preferably some distance back from its edges. A number of hinges arranged along the length of the bars may be employed, and a spring 56 may also be applied to force each scraper towards the surface of the shell or casing. A sprocket Wheel 14 or similar element may be secured to the end of the sleeve 9 as a means for imparting rotation to the breaker frame.

An intermediate breaker frame is located within the outer frame just described, this intermediate frame comprising a hub 15, a sleeve 16 projecting from said hub, arms 17 secured and extending radially from said hub and breaker bars 18 secured to the ends of the arms 17 the ends of each bar being secured to .the ends of oppositely arranged arms located near the ends of the shell 4;. These bars are preferably of angular shape in cross section similar to the breaker bars 11, as shown in Figure 1 of the drawings. A driving member 19, shown herein as a spur gear, is secured to the outer end of the sleeve 16 as a means for rotating the intermediate breaker frame. In the preferred form of construction, and as shown herein, there are driving members 14 and 19 secured to opposite ends of the outer and inner breaker frame sleeves, so that driving power is applied to each end of said structures for the purpose of obtaining even driving force thereon.

An expeller 20 is secured to an expeller shaft 21 rotatably mounted in the sleeve 16 and having a driving member, as a sprocket wheel, 22 secured to its outer end as a means for imparting rotation to the expeller. Said expeller is preferably composed of metal cast in halves and cored to form thin walls 23 excepting at the ends 24 which are formed thick enough to constitute a solid bearing on the shaft 21 and to which shaft said expeller is secured. This expeller is somewhat of oval shape, except that it is provided with oppositely disposed edges 25 that are more or less sharp. It prevents any collection of material at the center of the shell by continuously throwing material towards the wall of the shell, and such material is thoroughly disintegrated by the action of the breaker bars cooperating with each other and with the wall of the shell.

In the operation of the machine the breaker frames and expeller are so operated that the contents of the shell will be under constant agitation, this result being obtained by imparting relatively different movements to the breaker frames and expeller. This result may be obtained by rotating said frames and expeller in the same direction but at different rates of speed, or it may be obtained, as illustrated in the drawings herein, by rotating said frames and expeller in opposite directions and at the same or at different rates of speed. The sprocket wheels 14 and 22 being driven as by means of sprocket chains from sprocket wheels on a common driving shaft, and the spur gear 19 being driven as by a spur gear on said driving shaft, it will be obvious that the outer breaker bars with their frame and the expeller may be driven in one direction, as clock-wise, while the intermediate breaker frame and its bars will be driven in a contra-clockwise direction. While rotating in this direction, the angularly shaped and inclined bars 11 and 18 will operate to force material toward the wall of the shell. If the direction of rotation is reversed, the said breaker bars will operate to force material toward the center of the shell.

Said driving shaft 26 may be supported as in bearings 27 at the outer ends of arms 28 secured to and projecting from the heads of the shell, and as shown in the dotted lines in Figure 1. The sprocket wheels and spur gear are indicated by concentric dotted lines surrounding the driving shaft to which said sprocket wheels and spur gear are secured, and the sprocket chains are indicated by dotted lines. The driving pulley for the shaft 26 is also shown by dotted lines, although such pulley and the sprocket wheel 22, owing to the line of section, would be removed, but they are nevertheless shown for the purpose of illustrating the construction. The driving pulley or pulleys will be arranged to drive the shaft 26 in opposite directions and any suitable means, as straight and cross belts 29 and 30 may be employed for this purpose.

A hopper 31 is positioned at a loading opening into the top of the shell, said opening being of a length nearly equal to that of the shell. A cover plate 32, curved on the same are as that of the shell, is fitted to close said opening, and bars 33 are fitted to the sides of the hopper and are secured to the cover plate as by means of bolts passing through flanges in the bars, and as shown in Figure 1 of the drawings. A lever handle 34 having a counterpoise weight is secured to one of said bars, and a clamping member 35 of any suitable construction is supported by the hopper to engage the edge of the other bar to secure the cover plate in its closed position. The handle and the bar to which it is secured will be provided with one or more pivotal supports 36 as a means for pivotally raising the cover plate to uncover the opening in the shell. A discharge pipe 37 is attached to one of the heads 6 at the bottom thereof and a discharge valve 38 is applied to a discharge opening into said pipe. This valve may be operated in any suitable manner, as by a worm-rack and pinion, as shown in Figure 2 of the drawings, the pinion being operated as by means of a hand wheel secured at the upper end of a valve operating rod 39. The rack bar 40 is connected to the valve stem for rotating movement independently of said stem, and :1 lug 41 on said bar is adapted to enter a slot in a hub 42 projecting inwardly inside of the discharge pipe 37, said slot not being shown. At the beginning of opening movement of the valve, the rack 40 rotates without unseating the valve, but as soon as the lug 41 arrives opposite the slot, then the action of the worm and rack is to move the valve from its seat. When the valve is thus opened the pulp contents of the shell may be discharged.

A housing 43 is secured to the underside of the shell thereby creating a chamber 44 extending upwardly from the bottom of the shell for some distance on one side. Openings are formed from the interior of the shell into this chamber and these openings are closed by perforated metal screen plates 45 of comparatively fine mesh. A water intake fixture 46, that may be attached to any water supply pipe, opens into the chamber 44 and this may be used for the purpose of forcing water through the perforations in the screen plates in filling the shell with the desired amount of Water for operating purposes, and the screens will thus be cleared of any fibers or other obstructive material that may be lodged on such screens, and a wash discharge pipe 47 is attached to the bottom of said housing, opening out of said chamber. A wash valve 48 controls this wash outlet, and said valve may be operated as by means of a rack on its stem meshing with a pinion 49 on a valve operating shaft 50 that is rotated by means of a pinion on said shaft meshing with a rack 51 at the lower end of a valve operating rod 52 extending upwardly to a valve operating lever 53 pivotally attached to the side of the hopper and having a ratchet and pawl connection with a toothed segment 54 projecting from the top of the shell as a means of loeating the valve 48 in any desired position, this ratchet and pawl connection being of any well-known construction.

It will be understood that the paper, before it is subjected to treatment in my improved machine hereinbefore described, is shredded, and this may be effected by means of a shred der and duster of any'ordniary type which may or may not comprise a part of my machine but which, when forming apart of the machine, will be located to discharge its contents into the hopper 31 and therethrough into the shell or casing 4.

It should have been before mentioned that a wash water inlet connected to any suitable source of water supply is attached to the upper part of the shell, this inlet 55 and the fiX- ture 46, or their connections, having proper valves to control inflow of water to the shell.

In the operation of the machine the chamher in the shell is supplied with a water solution of caustic soda of proper strength. A two to five per cent solution has been found to effect satisfactory results. The shredded newspapers are fed into the hopper and preferably, at the same time, more water and caustic soda solution is supplied to the shell. The feeding of the shredded paper and the solution is synchronized so that the full supply of shredded paper, of water and of solution will be had at the same time, the machine, during this charging, being in operation. When the machine has been thus charged the cover may be closed and secured and the speed of the machine may be increased if desired. A complete disintegration and separation of the stock into individual fibers will take from about ten to twenty minutes, according to the amount of the charge. The direction of rotation of the breaker frames is now reversed by the mechanism hereinbefore described and at the same time the wash valve 48 is opened and the water is supplied through the wash water inlet 55. The agitation of the contents is thus continued and the action of the scraper blades 13 scrapes the contents from the interior of the shell and completely clears the screens 45 so that the liquid contents of the shell have free and unrestricted flow through the screens into the chamber 44 and into the wash discharge pipe 47 This washing of the contents will take from five to ten minutes, depending upon the amount of the pulp mass and the amount of water used. After the washing the wash valve is closed and a quantity of sodium bisulphite, either dry or in solution, is added, this being of proper strength and combined with water to whiten and neutralize the pulp. The discharge valve 38 is now opened and water is also admitted through the intake 46 whereby the pulp contents are flushedout through the discharge pipe 37. This inflow of water will completely clear the screens of any collection thereon of pulp and the latter is now ready to be supplied immediately to a paper making machine, if desired. On the contrary, it may be converted into any suitable state for subsequent treatment at any future time in a regular paper making machine.

On the contrary, if it be desired, the pulp may be dyed or treated in any well-known manner within the machine and before it is discharged by flushing it out as hereinbefore described.

In accordance with the provisions of the patent statutes I have-described the principles of operation of my invention, together with the device which I now consider to represent the best embodiment thereof; but I desire to have it understood that the device shown is only illustrative, and that the invention may be carried out by other means and applied to uses other than those above set out.

I claim:

1. A deinking machine comprising a shell having a filling opening, a plurality of dissimilarly shaped sets of breaker elements movably mounted in said shell, and means for moving said sets of elements in spaced relation one past another.

2. A deinking. machine comprising a shell having a filling opening, a plurality of breaker elements movably mounted in said shell, an expeller movably mounted in said shell to force material toward the outlet thereof and means for moving said elements in opposite directions and in spaced relation with respect to said expeller.

3. A deinking machine comprising a shell having a filling opening, a plurality of breaker elements rotatably mounted in said shell, means for moving said elements in spaced relation one past another, and means movably mounted in the shell for expelling material toward the wall of the latter and toward the said breaker elements.

4. A deinking machine comprising a shell having a filling opening, a plurality of breaker elements movably mounted in said shell, means for moving said elements in spaced relation one past another, a screened outlet from said shell, a wash water inlet on the outlet side of said screen, and means for controlling the outlet flow of liquid through said outlet.

5. A deinking machine comprising a shell having a filling opening, a plurality of breaker elements rotatably mounted in said shell, means for rotating said elements 1n spaced relation in opposite directions one with respect to another, a screened outlet from said shell, a wash water inlet on the outlet side of said screen, and means for controlling flow of liquid through said outlet.

6. A deinking machine comprising a shell having a filling opening and an outlet chamber at the bottom thereof, a screen separating said outlet chamber from the chamber Within the tank, a plurality of breaker elements movably mounted in said shell, some of said breaker elements each including a breaker and a scraper, the latter positioned to contact with said screen and means for moving said elements in spaced relation one past another.

7. A deinking machine comprising a shell having a filling opening and an outlet chamber at the bottom thereof, a plurality of breaker elements movably mounted in said shell, means for moving said elements in spaced relation one past another, and a screen separating said outlet chamber from the interior of said shell, said chamber having an opening for flow of wash liquid therethrough into the shell for cleaning the screen.

8. A deinking machine comprising a shell having a filling opening and an outlet chamber at the bottom thereof, a plurality of breaker elements movably mounted in said shell, means for moving said elements in spaced relation one past another, and a screen separating said chamber from the interior of the shell, said chamber having an opening independent of the screen mesh for flow of liquid thereinto and another opening for outflow of liquid therefrom.

9. A deinking machine comprising a shell having a filling opening and an outlet chamber at the bottom thereof, a plurality of breaker elements movably mounted in said shell, means for moving said elements in spaced relation one past another, a screen located between said chamber and the interior of said shell, said chamber having an opening for flow of liquid therethrough and into the shell through the screen, and a discharge outlet communicating with the interior of said shell for discharge of the contents thereof.

10. A deinking machine comprising a shell having a filling opening, a plurality of breaker elements movably mounted in said shell, means for moving said elements in spaced relation one past another, and scrapers pivotally attached to some of said elements for movement substantially in contact with the wall of said shell.-

11. A deinking machine comprising a shell having a filling opening, a plurality of breaker elements movably mounted in said shell and arranged in sets, one set having scrapers and being located in proximity to the wall of the shell and another set at a distance farther therefrom, and means for moving said elements in spaced relation one past another.

12. A deinking machine comprising a shell having a filling opening, a lurality of breaker frames movably mounte in the shell and each comprising arms with breaker bars secured to the outer ends thereof, the arms on one frame being of a different length from those on another, certain of said breaker bars having scrapers movably attached thereto, and means for moving said frames to efiect movement of said bars one past another.

13. A deinking machine comprising a shell having a filling opening, a plurality of breaker frames rotatably mounted in said shell, and each comprising arms projecting radially therein, the arms on each frame being different in length from those on another frame, breaker bars secured to the outer ends of said arms, an expeller rotatably mounted within said frames, and means for rotating said frames and expeller in opposite directions one with respect to another.

14. A deinking machine comprising a shell having a filling opening, a plurality of breaker frames movably mounted in said shell, each frame comprising arms projecting therefrom, the arms on one frame being of a length different from those on another frame, and the ends of said arms being of angular shape, breaker bars each comprising an angularly shaped portion secured to the outer ends of said arms, and means for moving said bars one past another.

15. A deinking machine comprising a shell having a filling opening, a breaker frame movably mounted in said shell and comprising arms projecting therefrom, breaker bars secured to the outer ends of said arms, scrapers pivotally attached to said bars, means for moving said frames within said shell, and means for reversing the direction of movement of said frame.

16. A deinking machine comprising a shell having a filling opening, breaker frames rotatably mounted in said shell, and each comprising arms extending radially therefrom, the arms on one frame being of a length different from those on another, breaker bars secured to the outer ends of said arms, scrapers pivotally attached to the bars on the longer of said arms, means for operating said frames to move said bars in spaced relation one past another, and means for reversing the movement of said frames.

17. A deinking machine comprising a shell having a filling opening, a plurality of breaker elements movably mounted in said shell, means for moving said elements in spaced relation one past another, a housing secured to the bottom of the shell to form a chamber, a screen separating said chamber from the interior of the shell, a liquid outlet from the bottom of said chamber, and liquid inlets on opposite sides of said screen.

18. A deinking machine comprising a shell having a filling opening, a plurality of breaker elements movably mounted in said shell, means for moving said elements in spaced relation one past another, a housing secured to the bottom of said shell to form a cham- 1 her, a screen separating said chamber from the interior of the shell, an outlet from the lower portion of the shell for the solid contents thereof, and a liquid inlet opening into said chamber below said screen.

19. A deinking machine comprising a shell, means positioned in said shell movable in one direction to force material toward the outer wall of the shell and movable in the opposite direction for forcing material toward the center of the shell, and means for reversibly moving the aforementioned means.

20. A deinking machine comprising a shell, angularly shaped and inclined breaker bars positioned in said shell movable in one direction to force material toward the outer wall of the shell and movable in the opposite direction to force material towardthe center of the shell, and means for reversibly moving the said breaker bars.

' 21. A deinkingmachine comprising a shell,

angularly shaped and inclined breaker bars positioned in said shell and movable in one direction to force material toward the outer wall of the shell and movable in the opposite direction for forcing material toward the center of the shell, an expeller located in the region of the center of the shell and movable to force material toward the outer wall of the shell, means for reversibly moving the said breaker bars, and means for moving the expeller.

22. A'deinking machine comprising a shell having an inlet opening for the material being treated and a wash water inlet, said shell having a perforated wall section, av

chamber formed outside of said perforated wall section, an outlet in said shell for the treated material, and means for washing the treated material through said outlet.

23. A deinking machine comprising a shell having a filling opening for the material to be treated and a perforated wall portion positioned opposite said filling opening, a controlled outlet for the shell through which the treated material is discharged, and means associated with the outer surface of the perforated portion of the shell wall for feeding wash water through said wall portion to free the perforations of wedged material.

GRANT HAMMOND.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US5178335 *Sep 3, 1991Jan 12, 1993Theo MertensMill
Classifications
U.S. Classification162/261, 241/101.2, 241/38, 241/84, 241/60, 241/46.6, 241/224, 241/46.11
International ClassificationD21B1/00, D21B1/32
Cooperative ClassificationD21B1/325
European ClassificationD21B1/32C