Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS1846823 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 23, 1932
Filing dateAug 1, 1929
Priority dateAug 1, 1929
Publication numberUS 1846823 A, US 1846823A, US-A-1846823, US1846823 A, US1846823A
InventorsAndrew Westberg
Original AssigneeLouis Marx & Company
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Toy
US 1846823 A
Images(2)
Previous page
Next page
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Feb. 23, 1932. A. WESTBERG TOY Filed Aug. 1, 1929 2 Sheets-Sheet INVENTOR Andrew Wesf br Z BY/ Feb. 23, 1932.

A. WESTBERG Filed Aug. 1, 1929 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 Patented Feb. 23, 1932 UNITED STATES ,PATE'NT OFFICE ANDREW WESTBERG, OF PORTLAND, OREGON, ASSIGNOR TO LOUIS MARX & COMPANY, 7

OF NEW YORK, N. Y., A CORPORATION OF NEW YORK TOY Application filed August 1, 1929. Serial No. 382,654.

This invention relates to toys and more particularly to a vehicle toy adapted for the automatic performance of eccentric movements and stunts.

The primary object of my invention centers about the provision of a mechanical toy, preferably in the form of a vehicle, which is capable of automatically performing erratic and eccentric movements and stunts in a relatively vigorous and highly amusing manner.

More specifically, one object of my invention resides in the provision of a vehicle toy which is automatically steered erratically to one side or the other in an unstable and unpredictable manner. A further object of my invention is to so design the toy that it will frequently during the course of its travel be upset or capsized onto its side'or top. Anothor object of my invention resides in the provision of means to right the vehicle or restore it to its Wheels for further travel after it has been upset.

Still another object of my invention is to prevent racing of the driving motor of the vehicle when the load thereon is relieved by the vehicle being upset so that its wheels are no longer in frictional engagement with the supporting surface. A still further object of the present invention is to provide a relatively simplified construction for the vehicle toy, employing a minimum of added parts relative to those required in an ordinary vehicle toy, by judicious location and shaping of the parts of the vehicle toy so as to permit of these parts performing in many cases a plurality of functions.

To the accomplishment of the foregoing and such other objects as will hereinafter appear, my invention consists in the elements and their relation one to the other as hereinafter are more particularly described in the specification and sought to be defined in the claims. The specification is aecompaniedby drawings in which:

Fig. 1 illustrates the manner in which the toy is upset;

Fig. 2 is a partially sectioned elevation showing the driving mechanism of the toy;

Fig. 3 is a plan View of the toy in inverted E, and may additionally be provided with governor means F to prevent excessive racing of the motor E when the toy has been upset.

Considering these elements more in detail, the vehicle body A may be made of suitable shape to simulate a vehicle of any preferred type, such as a motor car or locomotive and the like. It is desirable that the roof 2 of the vehicle be made arcuate in shape,'as illustrated 1n the drawlngs, in order to lnsure that when the toy is capsized or upset completely upside down, as it is most apt to be when the motor has just been energized, the toy will not rest in this position but will roll at least partially over toward one side or the other.

The upsetting means B is preferably provided by an appropriatealteration of the steering mechanism of the vehicle which will next be described. This steering mechanism is best shown in Fig. 3, in which there is a pair of guide wheels 4, which are rotatably mounted on stub axles or hearing pins 6. The bearing pins 6 are pivotally mounted to permit steering oscillation of the wheels-4 on king pins 8 which are fixed to a stationary pedestal 10 attached to the vehicle. To lend rigidity to the support of the bearing pins 6 on the king pins 8 the oscillatable knuckles 12 therebetween may be bifurcated in the manner shown in Fig. 2. A cross rod 14 is connectedbetween the knuckles 12 in order to maintain parallelism between the'wheels.

It should be observed that,'contrary to the usual practice, the king pins 8 of the steering mechanism are located a substantial distance to the rear of the axes of rotation of the wheels 4 or the bearing pins 6. In this travel for the toy, entirely aside from its special upsetting function in this toy. For a vehicle of given stability, and a given vehicle speed, there is a steering angle which will shorten the turning radius of the vehicle sufiiciently to cause it to upset. The same vehicle operated at the same speed but with a lesser permitted steering oscillation, as by widening the stop projection 16, will not upset. Or the same vehicle, with the same turning radius, but run at a slower speed, also will not upset. The latter fact proves useful in the present toy, if it is provided with a spring motor as in the specific embodiment here illustrated, for when the motor is nearly unwound the vehicle begins to slow below the normal speed, as determined by the traveling resistance of the vehicle and the governor F, and the toy no longer upsets, but nevertheless performs in an amusing manner because of the erratic path it takes in its continued travel.

It will be appreciated that while'the vehicle is traveling in a circular path in one direction the favorable meeting of any slight projection or irregularity in the surface upon which the vehicle is traveling may tend to oscillate the front wheels toward their other extreme position, and once they are moved past dead center by any such tendency they immediately continue oscillating toward their other extreme position.

The actuating means E for the vehicle has in this case been illustrated as a spring motor provided with a spiral or ribbon main spring 20, one end of which is fixed to the vehicle and the other end of which is attached to a winding shaft 22. The winding shaft carries a ratchet 24 afiixed thereto, and a gear wheel 26 mounted for free rotation thereon. A pawl 28, pivoted on the gear wheel 26, is kept in contact with the ratchet by a light spring 30, so that the main spring 20 may be wound without rotating the remainder of the motor. However, as the spring unwinds it turns shaft 22 and ratchet 24, which drives pawl 28 and with it gear 26. The'latter meshes with pinion 32, which in turn drives gear 84, which meshes with a pinion 36 mounted on the shaft or axle 38 carrying the rear or driving wheels 40 of the vehicle. The motor elements are mounted in a motor housing 39, united to the body A of the vehicle by rivets 41.

The rear wheel axle 38, which at the same time is the final drive shaft of the motor E, preferably, though not necessarily, is provided with a speed limiting means or governor F to prevent excessive racing of the motor when the driving wheels 40 are released from frictional engagement with the ground because of the vehicle being upset. This governor means preferably comprises a plurality of elastic or yieldable arms 42, arranged to rotate with the shaft 38, which arms tend to move outwardly by centrifugal force, and in so doing they frictionally engage a stationary bearing surface 44. As illustrated in the drawings, the arms 42 are mostsimply provided by cutting or incising a rubber drum with a plurality of tangential cuts, so that the periphery of the drum remains circular, as before, but may expand under high speed rotation so as to frictionally engage an arcuate surface 44, properly spaced to become effective at the desired maximum rotational speed. As applied to the particular toy here disclosed it will be understood that this desired speed limit is in excess of, or at least sufiicient to cause upsetting of the vehicle when turning on the radius defined by the permittedsteering oscillation of the steering mechanism.

The upsetting operation takes place about as is illustrated in Fig. 1, the vehicle turning so sharply and traveling at so great a speed that it is rather vigorously turned over onto its side, and in fact, when the motor has been newly energized this action is so forceful that the toy is completely capsized, though it then will roll at least partially over onto either of its sides. To restore or right the vehicle movable restoring means D is provided. In the present case the restoring means is actuated by the same driving motor E that propels the vehicle, and is most simply provided by suitably shaping the winding key of the motor E, and more preferably by providing a similarly shaped winding key at each side of the vehicle, both rotating with the winding shaft 22. In this manner the restoring means is built with a'minimurn of additional parts, and is driven at a relatively slow speed but with a relatively powerful torque, as it should be.

In the form of toy here illustrated the movable restoring means D is suitably positioned and shaped to effectively cooperate with stationary restoring means C. The latter consists merely of a depending lug or projection struck out from the bottom of the vehicle body in suitable relation to the path of the end of the rotatable restoring means D. The depending projections C are located well above the ground or surface upon which the vehicle is traveling during its normal travel, and also are located completely off the ground when the vehicle is upset, but during the righting or restoring movement of the vehicle, and at a time when the vehicle is about to be lifted into upright position, the projection C adjacent the ground contacts therewith and acts as a fulcrum about which the movable restoring means D turns the vehicle for its final movement into upright position.

The restoring operation may best be deto be transverse to the longitudinal aXis of the toy. 'In this position the vehicle is nearly but not quite completely upside down, that is to say, it is upside down except that it is leaning over toward and resting upon the end of the restoring means D. However, the latter is rotating, and when it has rotated to a position parallel with the longitudinal axis of the vehicle the latter assumes a more nearly butnot yet horizontal position upon its side, it then resting upon the intersecting edge of the top and side of the Vehicle and simultaneously upon the two ends or the entire length of the key D. The key continues its rotation until it is again at right angles to the longitudinal axis of the toy, but at this time, the toy restshorizontally upon both ends of the key and upon the front end of the vehicle, particularlythe front wheels thereof, which incidentally serves to place the wheels in a turned position preparatory to steering the toy when it has been righted.

The horizontal position last discussed is that illustrated in Fig. 4 of the drawings, and, of course, should the toy have been upset relatively gently, or merely turned upon its side, it may assume the position shown in Fig. 4 in the first instance, but or dinarily the action of the toy is sufficiently vigorous to turn it over far more completely,

I and it assumes the position shown in Fig. 4

only after partial rotation of the restoring means D. The latter continues rotating, and the end turning toward the bottom of the vehicle bears upon the ground, and react against the winding shaft 22, thereby tending to lift the vehicle partially into an upright position, this lifting operation being illustrated by the transition between the positions shown in Figs. 5 and 6. As .the vehicle begins to lift into the position shownin Figs. 6 and 7 the projecting fulcrum means C contacts with the ground, and thereafter the pressure of the end of the key against the ground tilts the vehicle about the fulcrum C and about the front wheel of the vehicle, the key being sufficientv in length so that when it again reaches a position at right angles to the longitudinal axis of the toy the toy has already been brought into so nearly erect a position, as is illustrated inv Fig. 8, that it continues to turn by gravity onto all four of its wheels, and resumes its travel.

It should be noted that the fulcrum means C are so positioned longitudinally of the vehicle that the center of gravity thereof is forward of the fulcrum means. The arrangement therefore is such that the rear wheels 40 are kept clear of the ground during the entire righting operation, until the vehicle finally turns of its own weight onto all four wheels. If the fulcrum is improperly located so that either ofthe rear wheels 40 comes in contact with the ground a braking action results which slows up and loads the motor sufiiciently to greatly lessen the likelihood of its succeeding in restoring the vehicle to an upright position.

By suitably shaping the sides of the vehicle body the body may itself be made to act as the fulcrum means C, that is to say, there need not necessarily be employed depending projecting lugs exactly like those shown. In the claims, therefore, when speaking of these fulcrum means I do not intend to limit the claimsto the use of lugs projecting conspicuously out of the body, but rather to cover any configuration or shape of toy which is appropriately proportioned to attain the desired result.

The front wheels meanwhile have been at least partially turned during the lifting operation, and immediately oscillate to their extreme steering position, so that as soon as the toy gains speed it is again upset. By striking a projection on the surface on which the vehicle is traveling the wheels may be steered to one side or the other, and the vehicle upset in a corresponding direction. The restoring means as here constructed, however, being symmetrical and equally well operable on either side, the toy is quickly righted and continues its performance.

In order to give the rear wheels suflicient driving traction to attain the desired acceleration and speed, and in order to give the front wheels suflicient steering traction, all of the wheels preferably arerubber tired. and this construct-ion may be obtained by making each of the wheels, referring now more particularly to Fig. 8, out of relatively rigid side discs 50, between which is clamped a rubber disc 52 of slightly larger diameter. I

The mode of construction and operation and the many advantages of my novel tov will,

for the most part be apparent from the foregoing description thereof. The toy is relatively simple considering the numerous functions and stunts performed thereby, and at the same time is rugged and strong and is not at all injured by the abuse to which it is subjected in performing its stunts. It travels in an erratic manner, is upset and even completely capsized during its travel, but gamely and promptly regains an upright position and immediately travels off in another direction and again is upset. The upsetting and righting operations take place in alternate or cyclic succession, until finally the spring motor is almost completely deenergized, but even at this time it continues to travel at fairly rapid speed, and with unexpected erratic shifts in direction which make its performance even at this stage highly amusing.

It will be apparent that while I have shown and described my invention in the preferred form, many changes and modifications may be made in the structure disclosed without departing from the spirit of the invention, defined in the following claims.

I claim:

1. In a self-propelled toy vehicle, steering means comprising a rotatable wheel, a pivotal mounting for said wheel freely permitting steering oscillation thereof, said pivotal monntingbeing disposed a substantial distance to the rear of the axis of rotation of the wheel, whereby the wheel tends to oscillate to either of'its extreme steering positions, said resulting extreme steerin oscillation being sufficient to upset the vehicle in the course of its travel, and driving means operative to propel said toy vehicle by applying a driving force at a point behind said steering means.

2. A toy vehicle comprising a pair of wheels, bearing pins on which said Wheels are rotatably mounted, king pins on which said bearing pins freely oscillate to give the wheels steering movement, and a cross rod for maintaining parallelism between the wheels, said king pins being located a substantial distance to the rear of said bearing pins whereby the wheels tend to oscillate to one or the other of their extreme steering positions,-and driving means operative to propel said toy vehicle by applying a driving force at a point behind said steering means.

3. A self-propelled toy vehicle comprising a pair of wheels, bearing pins on which said wheels are rotatably mounted, king pins on which said bearing pins freely oscillate to give the wheels steering movement, a cross rod for maintaining parallelism between the wheels, stop means to limit the steering oscillation of the wheels between extreme positions, said king pins being located a substantial distance to the rear of saidbearing pins whereby the wheels tend to oscillate to one or the other of their extreme steering positions, the oscillation permitted by the stop means being suflicient to upset the vehicle during its travel, and driving means operative to propel said toy vehicle by applying a driving force at a point behind said steering means.

4. In a toy vehicle, stationary fulcrum means, a motor, and movable means actuated by said motor cooperating with said stationary means to right the vehicle after it has been upset.

5. In atoy vehicle, a vehicle body comprising stationary fulcrum means formed integrally therewith, a motor, and rotatable means at the sides of the vehicle actuated by said motor and cooperating with said fulcrum means to right the vehicle after it has been upset.

6. A toy vehicle comprising a vehicle body, wheels therefor, a motor, means to upset the vehicle off its wheels during its travel, and additional means actuated by said motor for righting the vehicle onto its wheels after it has been upset.

7. A toy vehicle comprising a vehicle body, wheels therefor, a driving motor therefor, means to upset the vehicle off its wheels during its travel under the propulsion of said driving motor, and additional means also actuated by said driving motor for righting the vehicle onto its wheels after it has been upset.

8. A toy vehicle comprising a vehicle body, wheels therefor, a driving motor therefor, means to upset the vehicle off its wheels and upon its side during its travel under the propulsion of said driving motor, and additional means actuated by said driving motor for restoringthe vehicle back onto its wheels and permitting continued motion thereof, said upsetting and restoring means operat- 1ng in cyclic succession.

9. A toy vehicle comprising a vehicle body, wheels therefor, a spring actuated motor therefor, and a winding key located at the side of said vehicle and rotatable in a plane parallel to the side of the vehicle for energizing said motor, said key being enlarged and suitably shaped to bear against the ground and right the vehicle after it has been upset.

10. A toy vehicle comprising a vehicle body, wheels therefor, a spring actuated motor therefor, and enlarged winding keys located at the opposite sides of said vehicle for energizing said motor, said keys being suitably shaped to bear against the ground to right the vehicle after it has been upset.

11. A toy vehicle comprising a vehicle body, wheels therefor, a spring actuated motor therefor, and a pair of enlarged winding keys located a substantial distance outward from opposite sides of said vehicle for energizing said motor, said keys each being suitably shaped to bear against the ground during rotation so as to right the vehicle up onto its wheels after it has fallen over upon the side at the key in question, so that the vehicle may continue its travel.

12. A toy vehicle comprising a vehicle body, wheels therefor, a spring actuated motor therefor, enlarged winding keys at the sides of said vehicle for energizing said motor, and depending fulcrum means at thesides of said vehicle, said keys being suitably shaped and positioned relative to the wheels and fulcrum means to engage the ground and right'the vehicle after it has been upset.

13. A toy vehicle comprising a vehicle body having a rounded top, Wheels therefor, va spring actuated motor therefor, means to up set the vehicle in the course of its travel, and enlarged winding keys at the sides of said vehicle for energizing said motor, said keys being suitably shaped to engage the ground and right the vehicle after it has been upset.

14. A toy vehicle comprising a vehicle body, a driving wheel therefor, a motor for rotating said driving wheel, restoring means operatively connected to said motor, a guide wheel mounted in unstable equilibrium to cause said wheel to tend to move to either of its extreme steering positions whereby said vehicle is steered erratically and upset, whereupon the restoring means tends to right the vehicle. a

15. A toy vehicle comprising a vehicle body, driving wheels therefor, a motor for rotating said driving wheels, restoring means operatively connected to said motor, guide wheels pivotally mounted for steering movement at a point a substantial distance to the rear of the axes of the wheels to cause said Wheels to tend to move to either of their extreme steering positions whereby said vehicle is steered erratically to one side or the other at sufiicient speed to upset the vehicle, whereupon the restoring means tends to right the vehicle.

16. A toy vehicle comprising a vehicle body, driving wheels therefor, a spring motor for rotating said driving wheels, enlarged winding keys for said motor located at either side of said vehicle, guide wheels pivotally mounted for steering movement at a point a substantial distance to the rear of the axes of the wheels to cause said wheels to tend to move to either of their extreme steering positions whereby said vehicle is steered erratically to one side or the other at sufficient speed to upset the vehicle, whereupon rotation of said enlarged winding keys causes one of the distance to the rear of the axes of the wheels to cause said wheels to tend to move to either of their extreme steering positions whereby said vehicle is steered erratically to one side or the other sufliciently to upset the vehicle, whereupon rotation of said enlarged winding keys causes one of the same to engage the ground and to cooperate with said fulcrum projections to right the vehicle.

18. A toy vehicle comprising a vehicle body, a pair of driving Wheels, a spring motor for rotating said driving wheels, a governor to prevent racing of said motor, a pair of enlarged winding keys for. said motor located at either side of said vehicle, a pair of depending fulcrum projections located at the sides of the vehicle body, guide wheels which are pivotally mounted for steering movement at a point a substantial distance to the rear of the axes of the Wheels to cause said wheels to tend to move to either of their extreme steering positions whereby said vehicle is steered erratically to one side or the other sufficiently to upset the vehicle over onto its side, whereupon rotation of said enlarged winding keys causes one of the same to engage the ground and to cooperate with said fulcrum projections to right the vehicle back up onto its wheels for continued travel and continued upsets in cyclic succession.

Signed-at Portland in the county of Multnomah and State of Oregon, this 23rd day of July, A, D. 1929.

ANDREW WESTBERG.

same to engage the ground and thus tends to right the vehicle.

17. A toy vehicle comprising a vehicle body, driving wheels therefor, a spring motor for rotating said driving wheels, enlarged Winding keys for said motor located at either side of said vehicle, depending fulcrum projections, guide wheels pivotally mounted for steering movement at a point a substantial

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2581584 *Jul 10, 1947Jan 8, 1952Ernest FieldsMovement for animated toys
US2587052 *Mar 9, 1949Feb 26, 1952Marx & Co LouisAutomatically turning wheeled toy
US2587082 *May 20, 1948Feb 26, 1952Alois AlbisettiToy wheeled vehicle
US2620594 *Sep 6, 1949Dec 9, 1952Frank ParisiMusical dozing animal toy
US2855722 *Feb 13, 1953Oct 14, 1958Hausser O & MDrive for toy vehicles
US3892086 *Aug 9, 1973Jul 1, 1975Mattel IncFlipper mechanism for toy vehicles
US4300308 *Apr 23, 1980Nov 17, 1981Tomy Kogyo Co., Inc.Toy vehicle capable of traveling on both its top and bottom surfaces
US4363187 *Sep 22, 1981Dec 14, 1982Tomy Kogyo Co., Inc.Toy capable of repeatedly upsetting and then righting itself
US6129607 *Dec 7, 1998Oct 10, 2000Bang Zoom Design, Ltd.Self-righting remote control vehicle
Classifications
U.S. Classification446/437
International ClassificationA63H29/02, A63H17/02, A63H29/00, A63H17/00
Cooperative ClassificationA63H29/02, A63H17/02
European ClassificationA63H29/02, A63H17/02