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Publication numberUS1848583 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 8, 1932
Filing dateJul 23, 1931
Publication numberUS 1848583 A, US 1848583A, US-A-1848583, US1848583 A, US1848583A
InventorsGeorge W. Swift
Original AssigneeGeobge W
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
swift
US 1848583 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

March 8, 1932. e. w. SWIFT, JR

MACHINE AND PROCESS FOR MAKING CORRUGATED BOARD Filed July 25, 1951 INVENTOR I v'v vvv v v v v V bl v.

Patented Mar. 8, 1932 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE GEORGE W. SWIFT, 33., OF BORDENTOWN, NEW JERSEY, ASSIGNOR TO GEORGE W. SWIFT JR, INC., 01 BORDEN TOWN, NEW JERSEY, A CORPORATION OF NEW JERSEY MACHINE AND PROCESS FOR MAKING OORBUGATED BOARD Application filed July 28, 1981.

This invention relates to machines for making corrugated paper board and more especially to that'type of said machines in which a pair of intermeshing paper-corrugating rolls operate upon a web for corrugating it, after which said corrugated web while it remains in one of the corrugating rolls, has its tips provided with adhesive preparatory to applying a .liner web thereto under the pressure roll between which and the corrugating roll. the corrugated web and liner are passed. For this purpose, the corrugating rolls andpressure roll are usually mounted on rotary axes arranged in a common vertical plane while an adhesive fountain roll is usually arranged to apply adhesive to the tips of the corrugated web as it moves downwardly around the lower corrugated roll on its way' to have the liner web applied thereto under the pressure of saidpressure roll.

Up until ten-to fifteen years ago, it was not uncommon to operate machines for making corrugated boards at a linear speed of from 60 to 70 feet per minute. At the present time, machines of this character may be operated at a speed running as high as 300 linear feet per minute. The feeding mechanism of machines of this nature usually consists of a plain drum which is pressed against and rotated by the lower corrugating roll. While this device is sufficient for applying a liner sheet to a corrugated web at a low velocity of movement, it is not suitable for high velocities. Thus, due to the inter-tooth spaces of the corrugating roll, the feeding action between it and a plain pressure roll, is nonuniform. For example, in an 8" corrugating roll operating tightly against the peripheral surface of a plain drum or pressure roll, the circular pitch of'the flutes in the former may be in the neighborhood of three-tenths of an inch. By actual measurement, this may produce a variation of about .0001 inch in the effective radius of the corrugated roll so that the linear feed of the paper varies considera- As the speed of the machine is increased, the effects of this variation as well as of the tension on the paper web, accompanied by an increased vibration of the several parts,

Serial No. 552,880.

produces an increasing tendency of the paper to pull back. In consequence, the flutes of the corrugated web are apt to be'deformed so that after one liner sheet has been applied to the corrugated web, said flutes will vary materially in depth. As a result, when a second liner sheet is applied to the other face of the corrugated web, the relatively higher flutes in the corrugated Web will operate to hold said second liner sheet away from the lower flutes and thus produces an inferior product.

The primary object of this invention is to provide an improved process and means of improved construction for producing highgrade corrugated board at high linear velocity. Toward the attainment of this purpose, my present invention contemplates the provision of one or more additional feed rolls or drums for cooperating one at a time with one of the corrugating rolls for the purpose of providing a more uniform and a better sustained-feeding action while at the same time prolonging the period of drying under a sustained pressure produced by this feeding action. As an illustrative embodiment of my invention, I have shown on the drawings two plain pressure rolls or drums which operate against a corrugated roll in divergent planes through the rotary axis of the latter, the arrangement being such that the maximum effect between one of the drums and the crown of a tooth of the corrugating roll becomes active in alternate relation to that occurring between the other pressure drum and a tooth of the corrugating roller. By means of this construction, an extra squeeze or impingement is applied to the joined webs and inasmuch as the pressure rolls are spaced around the periphery of the corrugated roll and operate thereon in alternation, it becomes possible to secure a practically continuous feed of the corrugated board at a high velocity, such, for example, as a linear velocity of 300 feet per minute. In effect, with two pressure rolls, the space between the teeth is practically cut in halves, the result being that an tendency of a hold back is prevented. ence, corrugations of uniform depth are produced and the feeding action is made practically uniform, so that when the second liner sheet is applied, the product will be of uniform quality. Furtherlmare, as the double-faced board manufacturing machine constructed in accordance with the underlying principle of this invention;

Figure 2 is an enlarged fragmentary side elevation of the same.

. Referring more particularly to the drawings, a web 1 which passes about a guide roller 2 moves downwardly and ispassed between an upper corrugating roll 3 and a lower corrugating roll 4. The corrugated web as it passes downwardly around the corrugating roll 4, has its tips brought into contact with a silicate-applying roll 5 operating in a bath of silicate 6 within a container 7. Following this application of adhesive, the corrugate web passes downwardly and to the right between the corrugating roll 4 and a pressure roll or drum 8 which presses a liner web 9 against the silicated tips of the corrugated web. Said liner'web is drawn from a mill roll (not shown) and passes upwardly around a guide roller 10 and thence between the pressure roll 8 and the corrugated web. The corrugated web with the liner sheet attached is then caused to ifollowaround the periphery of the lower corrugating roll 4 and between said lower corrugating roll and a second pressure roll 11 which applies an additional squeeze to the joined webs in alternation with that imparted by pressure roll 8, the relative angular disposition of said pressure rolls around the axis of corrugating roll 4 bein quantitatively measured by a mixed fractiona multiple of the circular pitch of the teeth on the corrugating roll 4, It will thus be understood that as the squeezing pressure between the lower corrugating roll 4 and pressure roll 8 cases up on one portion of the single-faced corrugated board, the squeezing'pressure be- 7 tween the pressure roll 11 and said corrugating roll 4 is increasing on another portion thereof, and woe versa. This construction and arrangement of parts has been found to produce a uniform speed to the single-faced corrugated board and to maintain the united webs under uniformpressure as it passes around the corrugated roll from one pressure roll to the other in such a way as to prevent the deformation of the corrugations of the corrugated web due to hold-back of the mill rolls. Thus, if there is but a single pressure roll, and the united webs are drawn tangentially from the cooperating rolls as indicated in dotted lines in Figure 2, whenever the" pressure roll comes opposite to an inter-tooth space, there is a tendency for slippage due to a materially lessened pressure so all of the tips of the corrugated web. In the preferred embodiment of my invention shown on the drawings, I prefer to pass the. corrugated web with one liner aroundthe spaced pressure rolls 11 and 8 in its movement toward the mechanism (not shown) for applying the second liner web.

claim 1. In a corrugated paperboard machine,the combination of corrugating rolls cooperating with ea'chother in the common plane of their rotary axes, pressure rolls peripherally contacting with one of said paper-corrugating rolls in angularly displaced planes including the rotary taxis of that paper-corrugating roll, the relative angular displacement of said planes being measured by the circular pitch of the paper-corrugating roll multiplied by a mixed fraction.

2. In acorrugated paper board machine, the combination of upper and lower papercorrugating rolls having their rotary axes arranged in a common plane, a pressure roll peripherally contacting with the-lower corru- 1 gating roll in said common plane, a second pressure roll peripherally contacting with the lower corrugating roll in a plane angularly displaced with respect to the first-mentioned plane, the periodic contacts between the teeth of said lower corrugating roll and one pressure roll being alternately timed with respect to the periodic contacts between the loger corrugating roll and the other pressure ro 3. In a corrugated paper board machine, I

ally contacting with one of said corrugating rolls in angularly-displaced planes through the rotary axis of that paper-corrugating roll, the relative angular displacement of the last-mentioned planes being such that at the instant one cuts one of the teeth of the pressure roll, the other cuts a space between two successive teeth. 4

4;. In a machine for making corrugated paper board, the combination of a pair of intermeshing paper-corrugating rolls having their rotary axes arranged in a common vertical plane, of a pressure roll operating on the lower paper-corrugating roll in said common plane, and a second pressure roll operating on said lower paper-corrugating roll in a plane including the axis of said lower papercorrugating roll and angularly displaced from the first-mentioned plane of centers, the

relative angular disposition of said planes being such that when one of said planes includes the central radial line of a tooth of said lower paper-corrugating roll, the other intersects a space between two successive teeth of said lower paper-corrugating roll.

5. In a machine for making corrugated paper board, the combination of a pair of intermeshing paper corrugating rolls having their rotary axes arranged in a common ver tical plane, of a pressure roll operating on the lower corrugating roll, said pressure roll being journalled upon an axis in said plane of centers of said corrugating rolls, means for feeding a web to said corrugating rolls and around the lower corrugating roll, means for feeding a liner web between said pressure roll and the corrugated web on the lower corrugating roll, and a second pressure roll operating on the corrugated web on said lower corrugating roll in alternation with the first" mentioned pressure roll.

6. In a machine for making corrugated paper board, the combination with a pair of intermeshing paper-corrugating rolls having their rotary axes arranged in a common plane, pressure rolls cooperating with one of said paper-corrugating rolls in angularlyspaced planes intersecting'each other in the rotary axis of said corrugating roll, and means for applying a liner web to the corrugated web as it passes around the paper-corrugating roll and between it and said pressure rolls, said pressure rolls being adapted to guide and deliver the corrugated web with its attached liner.

7. The process of making corrugated paper board, which process consists in corrugating a web between a pair of intermeshing paper-corrugating rolls, in applying an adhesive to the outwardly-presented tips of the corrugated web while enmeshed with one of said paper-corrugating rolls, in applying a liner web to said outwardly-presented tips of the web, and in pressing said liner web into intimate contact with said corrugated web while said Webs are being passed over the corrugating roll between two pressure rolls which alternately operate on teeth in the corrugating roll.

8. The process of making corrugated paper board, which process consists in silicating the tips of a corrugated web enmeshed with a corrugated roll, in applying a liner web to the silicated tips of said corrugated web, and in pressing said webs into intimate contact with each other around a portion of the periphery of said corrugated roll by means of pressure-applying rolls operating in alternation on said corrugated roll at peripherallyspaced points along said portion of corru- UB gated r011 periphery.

9. The process of making corrugated paper board, which process consists in applying a liner web to the silicated tips of one face of a corrugated web, in pressing said webs into intimate contact with each other while'passing them around an arcuate portion of a corrugated roll, and in alternately applying pressure to said liner and corrugated webs at angularly-spaced points on said corrugated roll.

10. The process of making corrugated paper board, which process consists in passing a corrugated web part-way around a corrugated roll with its corrugations enmeshed with the corrugated roll, in applying an adhesive to the outwardly-presented tips of the corrugated web carried by said roll, in applying a liner web to said outwardly-presentedtips of the corrugated web, and in applying a feeding pressure to said liner and corrugated web at peripherally-spaced points on the corrugating roll during a series of time intervals.

'11. The process of making corrugated paper board, which process consists in corrugating a web between a pair of intermeshing paper-corrugating rolls, in applying an adhesive to the outwardly-presented tips of the corrugated web while enmeshed with one of said paper-corrugating rolls, and in applying a liner web to said outwardly-presented tips of the corrugated web by means of pressure rolls operating in alternation with each other upon angularly-spaced teeth of the last-mentioned corrugating roll.

12. The process of making corrugated paper board, which process consists in corrugating a web between a pair of intermeshing paper-corrugating rolls, in applying an adhesive to the outwardly-presented tips of the corrugated web while enmeshed with one of said paper-corrugating rolls, in applying a liner web to said outwardly-presented tips of the corrugated web, and in pressing said liner web intointimate contact with said corrugated web while said webs are being passed over the corrugating roll between two pressure rolls which cooperate in alternation with each other with opposed teeth in the corrugating roll for feeding said webs on to and off of said corrugating roll.

GEORGE W. SlVIFT, JR.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2572716 *Jun 27, 1949Oct 23, 1951Gaylord Container CorpApparatus for and process of forming single-faced corrugated board
US2979112 *Sep 9, 1957Apr 11, 1961Wilson Harry WCorrugating single facer
US8057621 *Apr 11, 2006Nov 15, 2011Kohler Herbert BApparatus and method for producing a corrugated product under ambient temperature conditions
US8398802Jan 22, 2010Mar 19, 2013Coater Services, Inc.Method for moisture and temperature control in corrugating operation
US8672825Mar 23, 2009Mar 18, 2014Hbk Family, LlcApparatus for producing corrugated board
US8771579Oct 30, 2013Jul 8, 2014Hbk Family, LlcMethod and apparatus for fluting a web in the machine direction
Classifications
U.S. Classification156/205, 156/459
International ClassificationB31F1/20, B31F1/28
Cooperative ClassificationB31F1/28
European ClassificationB31F1/28