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Publication numberUS1849218 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 15, 1932
Filing dateNov 5, 1925
Priority dateMay 17, 1924
Publication numberUS 1849218 A, US 1849218A, US-A-1849218, US1849218 A, US1849218A
InventorsChester H Beach
Original AssigneeJohnson & Son Inc S C
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Floor polishing machine
US 1849218 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

March 15, 1932. c. H. BEACH 1,849,218

FLOOR POLISHING MACHINE Filed Nov. 5, 1925 3 Sheets-Sheet l J H [I s n I: O 4 I n A MM 43 u 5% eac arch 15, 1932.

c. H. BEACH FLOOR POLISHING MACHINE Filed Nov. 5, 1925 3 Sheets-Sheet 2 March 15, 1932. I c. H. BEACH 1 FLOOR POLISHING MACHINE Filed Nov. 5, 1925 3 Sheets-Sheet 3 Patented Mar. 15, 1932 cnns'rnn n. amen,

OF RACINE, WISCONSIN, .A SSIGNOR, BY S. C. JOHNSON & SON, OF RACINE, WISCONSIN FLOOR POLISHING MACHINE Application filed November 5, 1925, Serial No. 67,026, and in Canada May 17, 1924.

r This invention relates to a floor polishing machine.

I The machineto which the invention is applied is provided with two cylindrical rotam polishing brushes or rubbers for rubbing and polishing the floor, a frame mounted on the axles thereof, a motor carried by the frame and driving 'he brushes, and a handle con-' nected to the frame to move the machine back and forth.

The object of the invention is to provide a machine which may be readily and easily manually moved.

Another object, is to provide a machine in which the brushes assist in-moving the machine.

Another object is to provide a machine which is eflicient and which will produce an even polish. I

Another object is to provide a machine which will remain in a stationary position with the brushes rotating, unless it is manuufactured.

The invention contemplates a machine in which the rotary brushes or rubbers rotate in opposite directions and turn inwardly toward each other at the bottoms thereof and the handle is pivotally connected to its frame at such a point that it causesthe front brush to assist in moving the machine forward and the rear-brush to assist in moving the machine backward.

It further contemplates a machine in which the frame is provided with a stationary brush for keeping the machine from be-- ing moved and vacillated by the rotary brushes unless it, is manually moved.

It further contemplates a machine in which the rotary brushes and the stationary brushes turn inwardl brush entirely support the frame and onl) these brushes engage the floor.

This application is a continuation of .pending application filed December 19, 1924, Serial No. 757,062, as to matter common to both applications.

The accompanying drawings illustrate a floor polishing and cleaning machine em- ASSIGNMENTS, T0

bodying thepresent invention, and the views therein are as follows:

Fig. l-is a side view of the entire machine .Fig. 2 is a longitudinal sectional view on the line 2r2 of Fig. 4;

Fig. 3 is a longitudinal sectional view on the line 3-3 of Fig. 4;

Fig. 4 is a sectional plan view on the line 4-4 of Fig. 2;

Fig. 5 is a sectional end view on the line 5-5 of Fig. 4;

Fig. 6 is a sectional view on the line 6-6 of'Fig. 4;

Fig. 7 is a perspective view of the stationary brush and dust pans;

and

Fig. 9 is a side view of the switch.

The machine, in general, comprises two cylindrical rotary brushes or rubbers 1 and 2, a stationary brush 3, a frame or casing i, an electric motor 5, and a pivotedhandle 6.

Fig. 8 is a sectional view of the pivot,-

The frame 4: issupported from the floor I entirely by the rotary brushes and the stationary brush. 1

The stationary upon the floor by springs 7, and ordinarily its pressure is about the same as the. aggregate or combined pressure of the two rotary -brushes.

The motor 5 is carried by the frame and removably fastened to the top thereof.

It drives the rotary brushes in opposite directions through gearing having a driving pinion 8 mounted on the motor,-intermediate gears 9 mounted on the frame, and driven gears 10 mounted on the brushes.

It is set to run in such a direction that the at the bottoms thereof, as indicated by t e arrows, and accordingly, the front brush tends to move the mabrush isjpressed downward.

to assist in moving the machine forward and the rear brush to assist in moving-the machine backward.

The reason therefor is that the handle tends to tilt the frame in such a way that the front brush has more pressure and traction than the rear brush as the machine is pushed forward, and the rear brush has.

more pressure and traction than the front brush as the machine is pulled backward.

The intermediate stationary brush facilitates this action, as it forms a pivot or fulcrum on which the frame tilts or rocks, but such brush is not required to cause the ro tary brushes to assist in moving the machine.

When the rotary brushes are rotating and the machine is not being manually moved back and forth, it is kept in a stationary position by the stationary brush which acts as a brake to oppose the rotary brushes.

If this brush were not present, the machine would vacillate and move backward and forward and sidewise, due to the rotary brushes not having constant equal traction.

The stationary brush facilitates guiding the machine in a right line, as it kee s the machine from being moved sidewise y the rotary brushes.

The frame or casing 4 extends over and covers the brushes and gearing, and it may be provided at its lower edge with a cushion or bumper 11.

The gearing 8, 9 and 10 is enclosed within the casing between the side thereof and a vertical longitudinal partition 12.

The motor is enclosed within the casing between two vertical transverse partitions l3 and a transverse horizontal partition 14 removably fastened to these vertical partitions.

The stationary brush is held in position by vertical pins 15 which are carried by the horizontal partition and have thereon thesprings 7.

The stationary brush maybe readily removed from the pins by an ejector or crank 16 which is carried by the frame and provided with an arm 17 and a. handle 18.

The arm extends over the brush and under a loop 19 fastened upon the back thereof,

and the handle is arranged outside the frame. When the ejector is turned by the handle the brush is removed from the'pins.

The; stationary brush may be provided ply circuit.

with dust pans 20 fastened upon the back thereof.

Each rotary brush has a tubular hub 21 which has the bristles set upon the outside thereof, and a metallic tube 22 arranged therein.

It is rotatably mounted upon a spindle or shaft 23 which is removably fastened to the frame by screws 24 and carries ball bearings 25 on which the brush rotates.

The ball bearings are held upon the spindle by plates 26 fastened to the hub by screws.

The driven gear 10 is mounted upon the inner tube 22 and held thereon against the hub 21 by the plate 26.

The lubricant for the ball bearings is retained thereon by the plates 26 and rings 27 The handle 6 is provided at its lower end with a yoke 28, the ends of which are con nected to the frame by pivot pins 29.

The pivot pins extends through the frame or casing and are fastened thereto by nuts '30 and provided with binding nuts 31 for connecting electrical conductors thereto.

The yoke is provided with a contact ring 32, which surroundsthe pivot pins and makes electrical contact therewith.

The pivot pin is insulated from the casing by insulation 33, and the contact ring is insulated from the yoke by insulation 34.

The yoke is provided at its center with a ferrule 35 having a sleeve 36 in which the handle is threaded and thereby fastened to the yoke.

The handle has therein a separable electrical connector which has a plug 37, and a receptacle 38.

The plug is connected tothe contact rings 32 by insulated conductors or wires 39 arranged in tubes 40 fastened upon the yoke.

The receptacle 38 is provided with a cord 41, which passes through the handle and is provided at its outer end with a connector plug 42 for connecting it to the electrical circuit.

The switch 43 for starting and stopping the motor is mounted upon the frame and provided with a key 44 for opening and closing the same.

The motor and the switch are connected in circuit between the two pivot pins 29 by conductors 45.

The current fer operating the motor passes from the supply circuit through the connector to one pivot pin, thence through the motor and switch to the other pivot pin, and then through the connector back to the sup- The machine set forth herein is very effi- (fzlient' and will evenly and uniformly polish a oor. It is very easy to' operate as its rotary brushes assist in moving it back and forth. It will serve both as a polisher and as a cleaner or sweeper, and it may be employed after, or to clean and polish the floor simultaneously.

The dust and dirt and other matter removed from the floor by the rotary brushes is collected in the dust pans.

Of course, the invention disclosed herein may be applied to machinesifor various purposes and it may be embodied in different forms.

The inventionis hereby claimed .as follows:

1.'A floor polishing machine comprising two cylindrical rotary rubbers having parallel axles, a frame carried by said axles and supported from said rubbers in opposite directions to turn inwardly at the bottoms thereof, and a han dle pivotally connected to said frame at such a point above and between said axles as to cause the front rubber to have more traction than the rear rubber as the machine is moved forward and the rear rubber to have more traction than the front rubber as the machine.

is moved backward.

'2. A floor polishing machine comprising two cylindrical rotary rubbers arranged parallel to each other, a frame mounted upon more traction than the rear rubber as the machine is moved forward and the rear rubber to have more traction than the front rubber as the machine is moved backward, and means for holdingthe machine from being moved by said rotary rubbers unless it is manually moved by said handle.

3. A floor polishing machine comprising two cylindrical rotary rubbers arranged parallel to each other, a frame mounted upon the axles thereof, a motor carried by said frame and driving said rubbers inopposite directions to turn inwardly at the bottoms thereof, a handle pivotally connected to said frame at such a point above and between said axles asto cause the front rubber to have more traction than the rear rubber as the machine is moved forward and the rear rubher to have more traction than the front rubber as the machineis moved backward, and a stationary rubber carried by said frame between said rotary'rubbers to hold said ma--' chine from being moved by said rotary rubbers unless it is manually moved by said handle.

4; A floor polishing machine-comprising .two cylindrical rotary rubbers arranged parallelto each other, a frame mounted upon" the axles thereof, a motor carried by said frame and -driving said rubbers in opposite the floor by said rubbers, a 7 motor carried by said frame and driving directions to turn inwardly at the bottoms thereof, a handle pivotally connected to said frame at such a point above and between said axles asto cause the front rubber to have more traction than the rear rubber as the machine is moved forward and the rear rubber to have more traction than the front rubber as the machine is moved backward, a stationary rubber carried by said frame between said rotary rubbers, and resilient means pressing said stationary rubber downward.

5. A floor polishing machine comprising two cylindrical rotary rubbers arranged parallel to each other,a frame mounted upon the axles thereof, a motor carried by said frame and driving said rubbers in opposite directions to turn inwardly at the bot toms thereof, a. handle pivotally connected to said frame at such a point above and between said axles as to cause the front rubber to have more traction than the rear rubber as the machine is moved forward and the rear rubber to have more traction than the front rubber as the machine is moved backward, a stationary rubber arranged between said ro;- tary rubbers, pins mounted upon said frame to hold said stationary rubber in position, and springs for pressing said stationary rubber downward.

6.'A floor polishing or cleaning machine comprising two cylindrical rotary rubbers arranged parallel ,to each other, a frame mounted upon the axles thereof, a motor carried by said frame and driving said rubbers in opposite directions to turn inwardly at the bottoms thereof, a handle pivotally connected to said frame at such a point above and between said axles as to cause the front rubber to have more traction than the rear rubber as the machine is moved forward and the rear rubber to have more traction than the front rubber as the machine is moved backward, a stationary rubber removably mounted upon said frame between said rotary rubbers, and dust pans carried by said stationary rubber.

.A floorpolishing or cleaning machine comprising two cylindrical rotary brushes arranged parallel to each other, a frame mounted upon the axles thereof, a motor arranged between said brushes and connected thereto to drive the same; in opposite directions to turn inwardly at the bottoms thereof, a handle pivotally connected to said frame and having its pivots arranged above the shaft ofsaid motor and substantially in vertical alinement therewith to cause the front brush to assist in moving the machine forward and the rear brush to' assist in mov ing the machine backward, and a dust pan tary brushes.

-mounted upon said frame between said ro 8; A floor polishing or cleaning machine comprising two cylindrical rotary brushes arranged parallel to each other, a frame mounted upon the axles thereof, a motor car ried by said frame and driving said brushes in opposite directions to turn inwardly at I the bottoms thereof, a handle pivotally connected to said frame at such a point above and between said axles as to cause the front brush to assist in moving the machine forward and the rear brush to assist in moving the machine backward, and. a stationary brush and a dust pan carried by said frame between said rotary brushes.

9. A floor polishing or cleaning machine comprising two cylindrical rotary brushes 18 arranged parallel to each other, a frame mounted upon the axles thereof, a motor carried by said frame and driving said brushes in opposite directions to turn inwardly at the bottoms thereof, a handle pivotally con- 20 nected to said frame at such a point above andbetween said axles as to cause the front brush to assist in moving the machine forward and the rear brush to assist in moving the machine backward, a stationary brush removably mounted upon said frame between said rotary brushes, and dust pans carried by said stationary brush.

10. A floor polishing or cleaning machine comprising two cylindrical rotary brushes, a stationary brush arranged between said rorotary rubbers'in opposite directions to turn inwardly at the bottoms thereof, and a handle pivotally connected to said frame at a point above and between the axles of said rotary rubbers to cause the front rubber to assist in moving the machine forward and the rear rubber to assist in moving the machine backward. s

15. A floor polishing machine comprising two cylindrical rotary rubbers having parallel axles, a frame carried by said axles and supported from the floor by said rubbers, a motor carried by said frame and having its shaft parallel to the axles of said rubbers, a drive connecting said motor and said rubbers to drive said rubbers in opposite directions to turn inwardly at the bottoms thereof, and

a handle pivotally connected to said frame at such a point above and between said axles as to cause the front rubber to havemore traction than the rear rubber as the machine is moved forward and the rear rubber to have more traction than the front rubber as the machine is moved backward.

In Witness whereof, I have hereunto subscribed my name.

CHESTER H. BEACH.

tary brushes, a frame mounted on the axles of said rotary brushes and entirely supported by said rotary and stationary brushes, :2. motor carried by said frame and driving said rotary brushes, a dust pan arranged between said rotary brushes, and a handle connected to said frame.

11. A floor polishing or cleaning machine comprising two cylindrical rotary brushes, a0 a frame mounted upon the axles thereof, a

removable stationary brush and dust pans arranged between said rotary brushes, and a handle connected to said frame.

12. A floor polishing machine comprising as two cylindrical rotary brushes, a frame mounted on the axles thereof, a motor carried by said frame for driving said bushes,

vertical pins fastened to said frame, and a stationary brush removably mounted upon 60 said pins.

' 13. A floor polishing machine comprising two cylindrical rotary brushes, a frame mounted on the axles thereof, a motor carried by said frame for driving said brushes,

vertical pins fastened to said frame, a sta- I tionary brush removably mounted upon said pins, and springs arranged upon said pins and pressing said stationary brush down-,

ward.

two cylindrical rotary rubbers arranged parallel to each other, a stationary rubber arranged between said rotary rubbers, a frame supportedentirely from the floor by said rubbers, a motor in said frame to drive said 14. A floor polishing machine comprising

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2439344 *Feb 7, 1945Apr 6, 1948Miller Edward AMechanical scrub brush
US2460183 *May 17, 1944Jan 25, 1949Samuel MayerElectrical utility brush
US2842788 *Jan 27, 1956Jul 15, 1958Racine Ind Plant IncCarpet scrubbing machine
US3150394 *Aug 21, 1962Sep 29, 1964Mount Sinai Hospital CorpBaseboard scrubbing machine
US3220043 *Mar 19, 1962Nov 30, 1965Electrolux CorpSelf propelled floor treating machine
US3401415 *Jul 15, 1966Sep 17, 1968Bissell IncCarpet sweeper with auxiliary brush
US3773112 *Feb 11, 1970Nov 20, 1973Zinck EMotor operated hand hoe
US4499624 *Feb 25, 1983Feb 19, 1985The Kartridg Pak CompanyPortable polisher
US4570278 *Jul 17, 1984Feb 18, 1986The Kartridg Pak Co.Portable polisher and buffs therefor
US5513418 *Jun 27, 1994May 7, 1996The Hoover CompanySuction nozzle with ducting
US6006402 *May 9, 1997Dec 28, 1999The Hoover CompanyVacuum cleaner suction nozzle configuration
US7617557 *Oct 18, 2004Nov 17, 2009Royal Appliance Mfg. Co.Powered cleaning appliance
US7861352Jul 16, 2008Jan 4, 2011Royal Appliance Mfg. Co.Powered cleaning appliance
US7900310Mar 8, 2011Royal Appliance Mfg. Co.Powered cleaning appliance
US20050011028 *Dec 30, 2003Jan 20, 2005Yasuda Technology (Holdings) LimitedMotorised floor sweeper
US20050217042 *Oct 18, 2004Oct 6, 2005Royal Appliance Mfg. Co.Powered cleaning appliance
US20100325820 *Aug 13, 2010Dec 30, 2010Reindle Mark EPowered cleaning appliance
US20110154589 *Jun 30, 2011Reindle Mark EPowered cleaning appliance
Classifications
U.S. Classification15/52.1, 15/41.1
International ClassificationA47L11/18
Cooperative ClassificationA47L11/4041, A47L11/4013, A47L11/18, A47L11/4075, A47L11/4061, A47L11/4002, A47L11/4069
European ClassificationA47L11/40J4, A47L11/40F4, A47L11/40H, A47L11/40L, A47L11/40B, A47L11/40D, A47L11/18