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Publication numberUS1849610 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 15, 1932
Filing dateFeb 16, 1928
Priority dateFeb 16, 1928
Publication numberUS 1849610 A, US 1849610A, US-A-1849610, US1849610 A, US1849610A
InventorsBoyce Edward C
Original AssigneeEdmund Quincy Moses
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Golf bag
US 1849610 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

E. C. BOYCE March 15f13i GOLF BAG 2 Sheets-sheaf Filed Feb. 16, 1928 INVENTOR BY W6. M 9* ATTORNEY E. C. BOYCE GOLF BAG Maw 15, 19.32.

2 Shets-Sheet 2 Filed Feb. 16, 1928 INVENTOR M 5% M} ATTORNEY Patented Mar. 15, 1932 UNITED STATES Plum OFFICE anwhnn c. BOYCE, on NEW YORK, n; Y., Assienon or ens-HALF 'ro Emmm) owner MOSES, or NEW YORK, N. Y. r a

GOLF BAG This invention relates to golf bags, and in particular to means combined with or incorporated in golf bags for supporting the clubs in a manner which keeps them in order and A 6 avoids liability of damage to the clubs when they are being carried around the golf course or are bein transported or stored.

It is an ject of the invention to provide in a golf bag or in Connection therewith,

310 means for suspending the clubs from the heads thereof so that the butt or handle por- 'tions of the clubs hang free and are relieved from weight tending to warp them.

A further object of the'invention is to provide means incorporated in or attached to a golf bag for mounting the clubs in a predetermined and systematic order, so that the desired club ,can be selected conveniently without searching for it.

A further object of the invention is to provide means for locating the clubs with their heads turned inward and secured against substantial shifting, so that the clubs can be transported conveniently to and from the golf course or on trips. This latter feature also facilitates the application of a hood on the bag to protect the clubs from rain.

It is a further object bf the invention to provide a device of sturdy construction which can be manufactured economically, and can be conveniently and securely attached to various sized bags of usual construction, and which, in conjunction with the bag, is capable of achieving the objects hereinbefore referred to.

Other objects and advantages will hereinafter appear.

In the drawingsforming part of this specification:

Figure 1 is a side elevation of a golf bag having an attachment embodying features of the present invention applied thereto;

Figure 2' is a vertical transverse sectional view through the upper end of the bag and the attachment;

Figure 3 is a fragmentary detail view showing the opposite side of the bag and attachment from that seen in Figure 1;

Figure 4 is a front elevation of the attachment;

Figure 5 is a plan view of the. attachment showing the golf clubs with their heads turned inward;

Figure 6 is a further embodiment of the attachment showing it made in one piece and of moldable material, such as fiber; and

Figure 7 is a fragmentary sectional detail view showing the present improvements incorporated as a permanent part of the bag.

In the illustrative form of Figuresl to 5,

the golf bag shown is of conventional construction and comprises upperand lower leather 'cufl'sl and 2, a canvas body 3 and stays or struts 4 running longitudinally of the bag substantially from top to bottom thereof. The upper cufi 1 encloses at the upper extremity thereof, a metallic ring 5 which, together with the leather surrounding it, forms a circular bead at the mouth of the bag. This bead is utilized for the securement to the bag of a mouthpiece or attachment 6. i

The attachment 6 comprises an outer ring 7, and an inner ring 8, said rings being separated by metallic spacers 9, 10 and 11. The

spacer 9 divides the annular space between the outer and inner rings into two SBCtlOIlS,

one designed for the reception of the shafts of the wooden clubs 12, 13 and 14:, and the other designed for the reception of the shafts of iron clubs 15. I

The inner and outer rings 7 and 8 jointly with the spacers form a split ring which mayand embrace the bead at the mouth of the -bag. A metallic strap 22 is secured permanently to the sheet 16 at one end of the are formed by such sheet and extends across the gap to overlie the oppositeend of said sheet. At such opposite end the strap 22 is provided with a slot 23 for receiving the shanks of screw 24 threaded into the sheet 16. In adjusting the attachment to a bag it is first laced with the extension 21 surrounding the ad at the mouth of the bag. It is then drawn tight to snugly embrace the bead and is then secured in this adjustedjposition by tightening of the screws 24 into binding relation with the margins of the strap 22 bordering the slot 23.

It will be observed that the leather spacer 19 projects above the sheets 16 and 17 of the outer ring, extends upwardly at an inclination, and is provided with notches 25 in its upper margin.

The inner rin outer and inner s eets 26 and 27 which may be of sheet aluminum, which sheets are separated at their lower ends by a strip of sole leather 28 and at their upper ends by strips of sole leather'29 and 30. The upper strip of sole leather 29, similarly to the strip 19, projects beyond the upper ends of the sheets 26 and 27,. inclines upwardly and is provided with a series of notches 30a.

In the minor are bounded by the spacers 9 and 10, the sheets 16 and 17 of the inner ring, and the sheets 26 and 27 of the outer ring, project upward to a greater height than in the remainder of the structure, and the leather strips 20 and 30 project above the upper ends of the sheets which they respectively separate. It will be observed that the inner ring is provided centrally with an extension 31 and that the outer ring is provided with an opposite notch or cut-out as indicated at 32, so that in effect three se arate notches are formed for receiving an positioning the heads of the three wooden clubs, 12, 13, and 14.

As the bag wouldbe customarily handled and used on the golf course, the wooden clubs would be suspended with their heads resting upon the leather strips 20 and 30, and their shafts terminating a short distance above the bottom of the bag. The extra length of this portion of the attachment is A provided because of the greater length of the shafts of the wooden clubs.

The iron clubs would be carried around the golf course with their heads turned outward as indicated in Figure 4, each club head resting in one of the notches 25 and the clubs being arranged so that the longest shafted club is supported on the highest notch 25 and all of the clubs are supported with their shafts out of contact with the bottom of the bag. The heights of the notches may be so arranged with relation to the lengths of the shafts that each club must be put into a definite notch. The arrangement of the clubs in a predetermined order may thus be made compulsory. The notches may also be varied in inclination to compel this result.

It will be seen that with this arrangement each club has a definitely assigned notch in is likewise composed of which it is retained so that the clubs are kept systematically in order and may be selected for use instantaneously without the necessity for any searching.

When it is desired to transport the clubs to or from the golf course or on a trip, or when it isdesired to cover the bag with a hood, the iron clubs are turned inward as shown in Figure 5, with their heads fitting in the notches 30a of the leather strip 29. In this position all of the clubs are supported with their shafts out of contact with the bottom of the ba so that they may be stored without the weight resting on the shafts and therefore without liability of warping.

At the same time that the, iron clubs are turned in, the head of the club 13 may also be turned inward to rest in the notch formed by the upturned bottoms of the clubs 12 and 14.

With this disposition of the clubs, there is no part of any club projecting beyond the circumference of the bag, so that the drawing of a hood on to the bag may be very simply and conveniently effected. 1

In Figure 6 a further embodiment of the invention is disclosed in which virtually the entire attachment, including the outer and inner rings 7a and 8a and the spacers 9a 10a and 11a, is formed of one piece, of moldable material such as fiber. In this form of the invention a metallic strap 22a extends completely around the attachment with its ends overlapping; This strap is formed to fit around the head at the mouth of the bag, be-

ing similar in cross-section to the lower end of the outer sheet 16 of Figures 1 to 5, but is slotted similarly, to strap 22 of Figure 3. Binding screws 24a secure the strap in adjusted position.

Figure 7 shows a further embodiment of the invention in which the present improvements are incorporated as a permanent and fixed part of the bag in the course of the manufacture thereof. In this form of the invention the bag comprises a canvas body 3?), leather cuff members 15 at the upper extremity thereof, and a device 6?; similar to the device 6a of Figure 6, having its lower margin embraced by the cuff members and permanently secured thereto by rivets.

While I have illustrated and described in detail certain preferred forms of my invention, it is to be understood that changes may be made therein and the invention embodied in other structures. I do not, therefore, desire to limit myself to the specific constructions illustrated, but intend to cover my invention broadly in whatever form its principle may be utilized.

What I claim is:

1. A mouth piece for golf bags comprising a split ring and having the upper end thereof provided with notches to engage the heads of clubs and hold the clubs suspended, said ring being expandible and contractible to fit different bags, and means for securing the ring in adjusted positions.

2. A mouth piece for golf bags comprising an inner ring, an outer ring, spacers separating said rings to provide an annular space between the rings and dividing the annular space into major and minor compartments, the portions of the rings bounding the major compartment forming an extension for the bag, and being provided with notches to receive the heads of short shafted clubs, and the portions of the rings bounding the minor compartment forming a further extension of the bag and being provided with'notches to receive the heads of long shafted clubs.

3. A mouth piece for golf bags adapted to form an extension thereof for suspending clubs by their heads, including inner and outer rings defining an annular space for the reception of the club shafts, at least one of the rings being provided with notches in the upper end thereof for receiving the heads of the clubs.

4. A mouth piece for golf bags adapted to form an extension thereof for suspending clubs by their heads, including inner and outer rings defining an annular space for the reception of the club shafts, the inner ring being provided with notches in the upper end thereof for receiving the heads of the clubs.

5. Amouthpiece for golf bags, including a ring which is of substantially the same diameter as the bag and forms an extension thereof. said ring having notches formed in the upper end thereof for receiving the heads of clubs. and means for engaging the clubs and preventing the club heads from sliding out of the notches.

6. A mouth piece for golf bags adapted to form an extension thereof, said mouth piece being long enough to suspend the clubs by their heads, and formed to interfit with the club heads and prevent rotation thereof.

7. A mouth piece for golf bags including means for engaging and interfitting with the heads of clubs to suspend the clubs with their heads out-turned, and means for engaging and interfitting with the heads of said clubs to suspend the clubs with their heads inturned.

8. A mouth piece for golf bags including means for retaining clubs against rotation with their heads turned outward, and means for retaining said clubs against-rotation with their heads turned inward.

9. A golf bag comprising a body sufliciently rigid to stand, and a mouth piece of varying height for suspending all the clubs by their heads with the heads located at different heights.

10. A mouth piece for golf bags including a ring comprising inner and outer sheets of metal and a non-metallic spacer interposed therebetween, said spacer being extended beyond the upper extremities of the sheets, and

bleilng notched to receive the heads of the c u s.

11. A mouth piece for golf bags adapted to form an extension of the bag for suspending clubs, said extension being of varying height and provided with notches, the arrangement being such that the placing of the longer shafted clubs in the higher notches is made necessary so that the arrangement of the clubs in a prearranged order is compulsory. v

12. A mouth piece for golf bags for sus pending clubs by their heads, comprising an outer rmg, an inner ring, and spacers integral with both of said rings, said rings having notches in the upper ends thereof for the reception of the club heads.

13. In a golf bag in combination, a body, and a mouth piece secured thereto and forming an extension thereof, said mouth piece being formed to interfit with the heads of individual clubs and being of such height as to hold the clubs suspended by their heads.

14. In combination, a golf bag, and means associated therewith for engaging and sup porting the club heads and for holding them against rotation and in predetermined position.

In testimony whereof I have afiixed my signature to this specification.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2436687 *Feb 1, 1945Feb 24, 1948Lee Corbett RobertClub head retaining means for golf club bags
US2534096 *Nov 7, 1947Dec 12, 1950Zapoleon Max MGolf bag
US2575126 *May 23, 1947Nov 13, 1951James C RamseyArrow holding attachment or rack for hunting bows
US2763309 *Sep 24, 1954Sep 18, 1956William Jones FrederickGolf bags
US3503518 *Sep 29, 1967Mar 31, 1970Black Howard JGolf club holder for bag
US4055207 *Jun 17, 1976Oct 25, 1977Goodwin Joseph EUnitary club retainer for golf bags
US4174747 *Nov 13, 1978Nov 20, 1979Crest Circle, Inc.Golf clubs restrainer means for use with golf bag
US4194547 *Aug 17, 1978Mar 25, 1980Sidor Edward JGolf club holder
US4208227 *Nov 16, 1978Jun 17, 1980Cowan Wallace CInternally stressed club holding collars for golf bags
US4995510 *Mar 21, 1985Feb 26, 1991Fletcher Jr Carl CClub-separating insert system for golf bags
US5099990 *Jun 21, 1990Mar 31, 1992Antonious A JGolf club holder insert for a golf bag
US5103974 *Mar 4, 1991Apr 14, 1992Antonious A JAdjustable golf club holder insert
US5226533 *Apr 3, 1992Jul 13, 1993Antonious A JGolf club holder insert for a golf bag
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US5511660 *Apr 13, 1994Apr 30, 1996Yamada; KikuoDevice for securing golf clubs
US5617951 *Jan 23, 1996Apr 8, 1997Wick; Philip B.Golf club organizer for a golf bag
US5620091 *Sep 29, 1993Apr 15, 1997Larson; Gordon E.Golf bag club holder
US5803252 *Jan 14, 1997Sep 8, 1998Huo-Chuan; ChenSystematic iron golf club hanger device
US6138825 *Jul 6, 1999Oct 31, 2000Summerlin; Ray R.Golf club manager
US6575311May 28, 2002Jun 10, 2003Hillerich & Bradsby Co.Golf club display rack
US6598743 *Apr 26, 2002Jul 29, 2003Joseph Anthony PuskaricGolf club organizer
US6702111Dec 10, 2002Mar 9, 2004Shinzo UenoIron golf club head protector
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Classifications
U.S. Classification206/315.6
International ClassificationA63B55/00
Cooperative ClassificationA63B55/00
European ClassificationA63B55/00