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Publication numberUS1852060 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 5, 1932
Filing dateFeb 9, 1929
Priority dateFeb 9, 1929
Publication numberUS 1852060 A, US 1852060A, US-A-1852060, US1852060 A, US1852060A
InventorsPeterson Roy E
Original AssigneeHotchkiss Co E H
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Desk stapling machine
US 1852060 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

April 5., 1932. R. E. PETERSON ,060

DESK STAPLING MACHINE Filed Feb. 9, 1929 Patented Apr. 5, 1932 nears P s-51E 1 ROY E. PETERSON, O3? N'ORVTALK, CONNECTICUT, ASSIGNOR TO THE E. H.'HOTCHKIS$ COMPANY, OF NOEXVALK, CONNECTICUT, A CORPORATION 03 CONNECTECUT' STAPLING- MACHINE Application filed February 9, 1929. Serial N'o. 338,893.

This invention relates to stapling machines and has foran object to provide improved means for setting staples so that the prongs will lie flat on the surface of the work and will beclosely clinched so as to better hold the work and not project an undesirable extent above the surface thereof.

With the foregoing and other objects in view, the invention consists in certain novel features of construction, combinations and arrangements of parts as will be more fully disclosed in connect-ion with the accompanying drawings. In the drawings,

Fig. 1 is a partial side elevation and partial section showing a stapling machine having my improved clinching means.

F 2 is a vertical section substantially on line 22 of Fig. 1 and on a larger scale.

Fig. 3 is a similar view showing the parts in position of clinching the staple.

Fig. 4 is a side elevation of one of the clinching anvils, and

Fig. 5 is an edge view thereof.

The machine illustrated comprises the usual base to which is pivoted the housing 11 at 12. The housing carries the usual vertically reciprocating plunger 13 which may be of the type disclosed in the patent to Polzer, #1588390, June 15, 1926, operated by a knob 12 at its upper end by a blow from the hand, and is normally held in its upper position by a spring 15 either outside or within the housing as desired. The staples 16 which are substantially Ushape are preferably of wire either round or somewhat flattened and.

are fed in an inverted position with their prongs downwardly along the top of the guide bar 1( by means of an inverted U-shaped follower 18 drawn forward by a spring 19 to feed the staples successively to the position edges are preferably provided with longitudina-l grooves 24 to receive and guide the prongs 25 of the staples. G11 the opposite sides of the pivots 22 from the free ends 23 the anvils The anvils also'have s brin 29. This s rin tends-to s read the h L b arms 2'? and retainthe elements in the position o'f'Fig. 2. The walls of the base at the opposite ends of the slot act asstops to limit the outward movements of these arms. In operation the articles to be stapled, such as the sheets of paper 31, are placed on top of the cam lugs 26 and under the forwardzend of the housing after raising the housing. The forward end of the housing then rests on top of the paper and when the plunger is depressed by a blow on the knob 14 the prongs 25 of the staple 16 are forced through the sheets of paper and their ends engage slots 24 on the top edges oftheanvils 21, andas'these edges are inclined downwardly and inwardly'the prongs are bent inwardly somewhat, as shown in Fig. 2. Further movement of the plunger and hand knob 14 downwardly carry with them the forward end of the housing :11 as downward movementof the plunger relative to the housing is limited by suitable stop means, for example by the shoulder 33 on'the plunger engaging the stop 34, andasthe under surface 32- of the housingrests on the cam lugs 26 this movement will press these lugsdownwardly and will turn the anvils to the position of Fig. 3, forcingthe free ends 23 against the under sides'ofthe work 31. This movement of the anvils will also-carry with them the prongs of the staples and will tightly press them against the under side of the work, and furthermore, will lay them out straight, as shown in Fig. '3. The prongs are, therefore, not curved so as to project'an undesirable amount above the surface of the work as is the case where a stationary-anvil using curved clinching surfaces is employed. It will be seen that this movement'of the anvil will given a positive folding or bending action to the prongs of the staples, very securely olinchingwthem'and giving a fiat staple proer, a pair of anvils pivoted in the base below jecting the minimum amount above the surface of the work.

Having thus set forth the nature of my invention, what I claim is:

1. In a stapling machine, a base, a housing pivoted to the base, a movable plunger in the housing, means for operating the plunger, one or more movable anvils mounted in the base to cooperate with said plunger to set a staple, said housing being normally spaced from the base, and said anvil or anvils including means adapted to cooperate with the'housing by relative movement of the housing and base to shift the anvil or anvils toward the plunger.

2. In a stapling machine, a base, a housing pivoted to the base, a movable plunger in the housing, means for operating the plunger, a pair 01" anvils pivoted to the base below the plunger and adapted to cooperate with the plunger in setting a staple, and said anvils including means adapted to cooperate with the housing by relative movement of the housing and base to swing the anvils toward the plunger.

- q to set a staple, lugs on the anvils to normally hold the housing above the base and adapted to cooperate with the housing to swingthe anvils toward the plunger on movement of the housing toward the base, and resilient means tending to hold the anvils in the retracted position.

4-. In a stapling machine, a base, a housing pivoted to the base, a movable plunger in the housing, means for operating the plunger, a pair of anvils pivoted to the base below the plunger and having lugs engaging the underside of the housing to normally hold it spaced above the base, and a spring tending to hold the anvils in this position, said lugs being adapted to cooperate with the housing to swing the anvils toward the plunger'onv movement of the housing toward the base.

5. In a stapling machine, a base, a housing pivoted to the base, a movable plunger in the housing, means for operating the plunger, said base being provided with a transverse slot under the plunger, a pair of anvils pivoted insaid slot and having free ends movable toward the plungers, lugson the opposite sides of the pivots from the free ends normally engaging the under side of the housing, arms on the anvils, a springbetween the arms tending to separate them and hold the lugs against the housing, and stop means to limit turning movements of the anvils under action of the spring. a

6. In a stapling machine, a base, a housing pivoted to the base, a movable plungerin the housing, means for operating the plungthe plunger to cooperate therewith to set a staple, and lugs on the anvils adapted to cooperate with the housing to swing the anvils toward the plunger on movement of the housing toward the base.

7. In a stapling machine, a base, a housing pivoted to the base, a movable plunger in the housing, means for operating the plunger, a pair of anvils pivoted in the. base below the plunger to cooperate therewith'to set a staple, lugs on the anvils adapted to cooperate with the housing to swing the anvils toward the plunger on movement of the housing toward the base, and resilient means tending to hold the anvils in retracted position.

8. In a stapling machine, a base, a housing pivoted to the base, a movable plunger in the housing, means for operating the plunger, an anvil pivoted in the base below the plunger to cooperate therewith in setting a staple, and said anvil includingmeans adapted to cooperate with the housing to swing the anvil toward the plunger on movement of the housing toward the base.

9. In a stapling machine, a base, a housing pivoted tothe base, a movable plunger in the housing, means for operating the plunger, an anvil pivoted in the base below the plunger and adapted to cooperate therewith in setting a staple, and a lug on the anvil adapted to cooperate with the housing to swing the anvil toward the plunger on movement of the housing toward the base.

In testimony whereof I aflix my signature.

ROY E. PETERSON.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3914845 *Aug 27, 1974Oct 28, 1975Olsson LarsDevice for joining parts together
US4328919 *Dec 21, 1979May 11, 1982Xerox CorporationStitchers
US6698640 *Jun 1, 2001Mar 2, 2004Max Co., Ltd.Motor operated stapler
US7621433 *Dec 16, 2004Nov 24, 2009Isaberg Rapid AbStapler
US7681771Jun 16, 2006Mar 23, 2010Acco Brands Usa LlcStapler
US8721245Dec 24, 2009May 13, 2014Max Co., Ltd.Penetration load reduced staple
US20070210135 *Dec 16, 2004Sep 13, 2007Isaberg Rapid AbStapler
US20090120993 *Jan 8, 2009May 14, 2009Acco Brands Usa LlcStapler
Classifications
U.S. Classification227/155
International ClassificationB25C5/02, B25C5/00
Cooperative ClassificationB25C5/025, B25C5/0207
European ClassificationB25C5/02F3B, B25C5/02D