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Publication numberUS1852242 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 5, 1932
Filing dateOct 7, 1929
Priority dateOct 7, 1929
Publication numberUS 1852242 A, US 1852242A, US-A-1852242, US1852242 A, US1852242A
InventorsHolt Claude G
Original AssigneeHolt Claude G
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Means for pumping fluids
US 1852242 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

April 5, 1932. c G HOLT 1,852,242

MEANS FOR PUMPING FLUIDS F i1ed Oct. 7. 1929 5 Sheets-Sheet 1 UPERA TING .4 Q U/D QTTORA/c 4 April 5, 1932. c. G. HOLT MEANS FOR PUMPING FLUIDS 3 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed Oct. '7, 1929 v/fA/////////// A ril 5, 1932.. c HOLT 1,852,242

MEANS FOR PUMPING FLUIDS Filed Oct. 7, 1929 3 Shegts-Sheet '3 59 54 53 [Inf imm; i 67 49 r ""40 fi 56 46 1;! 47 M: llliiin m f; I l 45-- 1 0 l 2 2 w i 2 II/III/III//////// I 50 //\/\//5N7TOE-' $1 |I (LG-Haw. 5, 2mm 2W3 W6 I 4 Q T 7 D {WV/6 Y.

Patented Apr. 5, 1932 (SLAUDE G. HOLT, OF ST. J'OHNS STATION, MISSOURI MEANS FOR PUMPING FLUIDS Application filed October 7, 1929. Serial No. 397,849.

This invention relates to means for pumping fluids. One of the objects of the inven tion is to successfully utilize a pulsating device to displace the fluid to be pumped. The

pump may be provided with ordinary inlet and discharge valves, and the above mentioned device may be pulsated between these valves to admit the fluid at the inlet valve and to then force it past the discharge valve.

Another object is to produce a device of this kind in which the pulsator is operated by a confined fluid which does not contact with the fluid to be pumped.

A more specific object of the invention is to produce a simple elastic pulsator confining the operating fluid and contacting with the fluid to be pumped. In this form of the invention, the confined operating fluid may be subjected to intermittent thrusts at a point remote from the pulsator, with the result of expanding and contracting the elastic pulsator and thereby displacing the fluid to be pumped.

Another object is to produce a pulsator adapted to be located in a deep well, and to transmit power to the pulsator by means of aslong body of confined operating liquid extending from the pulsator to any convenient point where the power is applied. For example, a motor-driven piston may be located at any convenient point above the ground, or in a basement remote from the well, and the confined operating fluid may extend from this piston to the pulsator near the bottom of the well.

This enables the power plant to be located at any convenient point, and since the power is transmitted through a fluid, it is not necessary to use sucker-rods, pistons, or an similar mechanical parts 1n the well itsel In the preferred form of the invention, I dispense with such devices in the well, as they are expensive and very difficult to remove for repairs. A sliding piston requires occasional repairs at the packing which should be maintained in condition to prevent excessive leakage. A sucker-rod is subject to the danger of breakage and likely to be bent and otherwise mutilated when it falls 59 in a well.

In the improvement hereafter described, the confined operating -fluid performs the function of a sucker-rod, while the pulsator performs the function of a piston in forcing liquid from the well, and the pulsating device can be easily sealed to eliminate the danger of leakage.

Another object is to produce a pump of this kind in which the downward ressure, due to the weight of the column 0 elevated liqco uid, is partly or entirely balanced by a correspondin column of operating liquid. The pulsating c evice, near the bottom of the well, lies between these .two bodies of liquid, so

the pressureof the liquids at opposite sides I of the ized. A. a

To start the pump, a downward thrust is pulsator can be approximately equal imparted to the column of confined operating liquid, thereby moving the pulsator to displace the corresponding column of liquid to be elevated. Intermittent thrusts on the confined operating liquid cause pulsations which continually discharge the other liquid from the well.

Another feature of the invention lies in a relief device having separate and distinct functions, and while it is most .advantageous to perform all of these functions, the invention is not limited to the combination, except as specified in the claims hereunto annexed.

Briefly stated, it is an advantage to have control over the capacity, or output, of any pump, this being especially true in pumpin from a deep well having a rather limite flowa For example, if liquid enters the well at the rate of three gallons per minute, it is not'desirable to use a constantly operating pump with a displacement of six gallons per minute.

I have shown a pumping apparatus including a conductor through which fluid is transmitted to and from a cylinder contain-' ing a piston. and this conductor is provided with an' adjustable relief valve through which portions of the fluid are discharged to regulate the delivery fluid from the pumping. apparatus. The piston may be driven at a relatively high speed, and it is not necessary to vary the stroke of the piston, as the capacity or output of the pump can be reduced to the desired extent by merely adjusting the relief valve.

This function can be obtained when the relief device is used with different types of pumping apparatus, and to illustrate one form of the invention I have shown a relief valve associated with the confined operating fluid, to automatically discharge portions of said fluid, thereby reducing the pressure at the pulsator which receives its power from said operating fluid.

Another important advantage of a relief device associated with the pulsator is obtained in starting the pumping apparatus. It is convenient to use an electric motor, or the like, as the source of power, and to transmit this power to a piston and thence through the operating fluid to the pulsator. A desirable type of electric motor operates at only one speed, and this speed is obtained instantaneously in starting the motor. Therefore,

' the piston is started instantaneously at its normal operating speed, and this imparts a very sudden and extremely severe thrust to the confined operating liquid. There should be some relief to prevent breakage, and to gradually bring the pulsator into service.

I have shown how the desired action can be obtained by permitting portions of the confined liquor to escape through-a pressureresponsive relief valve, and I have also shown how this liquid is automatically returned to the main body- With the foregoing and other objects in view, the invention comprises the novel construction, combination and arrangement of parts hereinafter more specifically described and illustrated in the accompanying drawings, wherein is shown the preferred embodiment of the invention. However, it is to be understood that the invention comprehends changes, variations and modifications which come within the scope of the claims hereunto appended.

Fig. 1 is a top view, partly in section, showin the power plant on a hollow table.

Fig. 2 is a diagrammatical view of a pumping apparatus embodying the features of this invention, showing a well and a power plant remote from the well.

Fig. 3 is a vertical section showing the pisston which imparts downward thrusts to the confined operating fluid, and also showing conductors through which the liquid from the well is transmitted to and from the space above the piston.

' chamber in which it is located.

Fig. 6 is a side view, partly in section, show- 1 ing the power plant and the relief device.

Fig. 7 is a fragmentary vertical section on i a larger scale, showing the relief device.

The pulsator is a yielding device acted upon by one fluid to displace another fluid, and its shape, form and dimensions may be varied. It may be used in pumping various kinds of fluids, so the disclosure of a deep well pump is not intended to limit the invention in any way- However, actual use of the invention for a long period of time in deep wells has shown that its advantages are perhaps most important in this particular field.

To illustrate a suitable pulsator which actual experience has shown to be entirely satisfactory, I have shown an elastic tube, preferably made of rubber, adapted to expand in response to the pressure transmitted ghrgugh one fluid, so as to displace another This tube is shown at 1 in Figs. 4 and 5. It lies in a chamber 2, which may be located near the bottom of a well 3, as shown in Figures 2, 4 and 5.

The liquid to be pumped from the well passes through the chamber 2 and rises in a pipe 4 to a power plant remote from the well, as will be hereafter described. The liquid passes the elastic tube 1 and it contacts with the outer face of said tube, but does not enter into said tube.

The operating liquid is confined partly by the elastic tube 1 and'partly by a conductor 5 which extends from said tube to the ower plant. This confined operating liquic does not contact with the liquid to be pumped.

To provide for the admission of liquid to The coupling member 8, screwed onto'the lower end of the chamber 2, is provided with an internal annular flange 9 (Figures 4 and 5) having ports 10 through which the liquid passes. The liquid leaving the chamber 2 passes a check valve 11 (Fig. 4) and thence into the conductor 4 which leads'to the power plant hereafter described. The check valve 11 is located in the discharge passageway leading from the top of the chamber 2, and this valve prevents the liquid from returning to said chamber. It will now be understood that if the elastic tube 1 (Figures 4 and 5) is expanded and contracted in the chamber 2, liquid will be drawn into said chamber and then discharged through the pipe 4. This liquid passes the check valve 11 when the elastic tube is exanded, and an additional supply is drawn mgo said chamber during contraction of the tu e. Before describing the means for pulsating the elastic tube 1, I will refer to the means for sealing said tube, so as to confine the operating fluid therein.

The elastictube 1 surrounds a rigid inner tube 12 made of metal and serving as an abut ment to limit the contraction of the elastic tube, said inner tube being provided with ports 13. The confined operating fluid passes back and forth through these ports when the elastic tube is pulsated.

The means for sealing the loweg end of the elastictube. (Fig.5) comprises a wire ring 14 surrounding said tube and forcing-a circular portion of it into a groove 15 in the metal tube 12. Another seal is formed at a slightly higher point by means of a bead 16 on the periphery of the metal tube 12., and a coupling device whereby a circular portion of the elastic tube is forced onto said bead.

This coupling device- (Fig. 5) includesa lower member 17 having a curved upper margin contacting with the elastic tube at a point opposite the bead 16, an upper member 18 having a curved lower margin contacting with the elastic tube, and a coupling 19 uniting said upper and lower members.

The coupling member '19 has an inturned flange at the bottom engaging a shoulder. on the lower member 17. The upper end of said coupling member is screwed onto the upper member 18. y

In sealing the lower end of the elastic tube 1,,

the coupling member 19 is screwed onto the upper member 18, with the result of clamping the elastic tube between the annular bead 16 and said members 17 and 18 A plug 20 is screwed into the lower end of the rigid tube 12 to prevent leakage at this end.

The means for sealing the upper end of the elastic tube issimilarto the sealing means at the lower end, so the upper sealing elements will be only briefly described. They are most clearly shown in the upper portion of Fig.5. A wire ring 21 forces a portion of the elastic tube into a groove in the rigid metal tube 12. Upper and lower members 22 and 23 are united by a threaded coupling 24 which may be adjusted to force sai members toward each. other, thereby fore mg a circular portion of the elastic tube onto a bead 25 near the upper end of the rigid tube 12.

The-upper endof this rigidtube is screwed into a coupling member 26, the latter being screwed into the head'27 on the top of the chamber 2. The conductor 5 for the confined operating, fluid is screwed into the coupling f member 26.

28 designates a rigid abutment tube (Figures 4 and 5) surrounding the elastic tube l and normally separated therefrom to permit expansion. This outer tube 28 is preferably made .of metal, and its upper end is screwed onto the coupling 24, the lower end of said outer tube being confined in the annular flange 9. Said rigid outertube 28 is perforated to form ports 29 through which the liquid from the well can pass back'and forth in response to pulsations of the elastic tube.

The function of the tube 28 is to limit the expansion of the elastic tube, and it prevents undue expansion at any point where the elastic tube may be relatively Weak. Moreover, since the abutment tube 28 is perforated and separated from the inner face of the chamber 2, said tube 28 also serves as a guard to prevent the elastic tube from obstructing the flow of liquid when said elastic tube is expanded. In other words, the elastic tube cannot under any conditions prevent a flow of liquid through the chamber 2.

To prevent the formation of destructive the detachable sealing members 18 and 23, near the bottom and top of said tube, are provided with flaring abutments 30 extending from end portions of the elastic tube and having curved inner facesadapted to contact with the outer face of said elastictube when the latter is expanded. -These curved faces prevent the formation of sharp bends in the elastic tube at the points where said tube is expanded near the sealing members 18 and'23. I,

I will now refer to thepower plant which is mounted on a hollow table 31 (Figures 1, 2 and 6) having a compartment 32 to which the conductor 5 is connected, a compartment 33 to which the conductor 4 is connected, and

a compartment 34 through .which the liquid from the well is eventually discharged to a pipe 35, said pipe beinoshown in Fi 1.

The power plant (Figures 3 and 6) includes a cylinder 36 mounted on the table 31 and containing a piston 37.;- The piston rod 38passes through a stuffing box at the top of the cylinder 36, and the upper end of this rod is connected to a bar 39 extending from a. pair of rods 40 which are reciprocated vertically by any suitable power mechanism. However, I have shown a motor housing 41, and the powerfll nay be derived from anelectric motor in this housing.

The lower end of-thecylinder is indirect communication with a port 42 (Figures 3 and 6) formed in the top of the compartment 32 which forms part of the means for confining-the operating liquid, said compartment 32 being connected to the pipe 5 which leads to the elastic tube. This operating liquid is 1 acted'upon by the bottom face of the piston 37, and-it. does not enter the space above the pistonq In Fig. 3, the highest position of this isishown by dotted lines.

The liquid pumped from the well (not the confined op'erating liquid) rises through the pipe utQ the compartment 33 (Figures 1 and 2), and leaves said'compartment 33 by passing through a pipe 43 provided with a check valve 44 (Fig. 3). This pipe 43 leads to bends in the pulsating elastic tube 1 (Fig. 5)

any

thespace above the piston 37, and it enters the cylinder at a point above the highest position of the piston, as shown in Fig. 3. The outgoing liquid leaves the cylinder 36 by passing through a pipe 45 having a check valve 46 and connected to the compartment 34 (Fig. 1) where the liquid flows as suggested by arrows to the discharge pipe 35 which may lead to a storage tank (not shown) or to any other desired place for use or distribution.

To understand the operation of the particular apparatus shown by the drawings, it

will be important to bear in mind that the operating liquid is confined by the following elements: The pulsating tube 1, the pipe 5 leading from said tube to the compartment 32, and the lower portion of the cylinder 36 which communicates with said compartment 32. All of these elements are entirely filled with the operating liquid, so the motion of the iston 37 is transmitted through the operatmg liquid to the elastic tube 1, and this tube pulsates in response to the reciprocation of the piston 37.

'When the piston moves downwardly, it displaces operating liquid from the cylinder, thereby expanding the elastic tube 1, so as to force some of the other liquid from the well. When the piston 37 moves upwardly, the elastic tube contracts, and. the operating liquid flows upwardly in the lower portion of the cylinder 36.

When the system is in service, the piston 37 is reciprocated to impart intermittent downward thrusts to the confined operating liquid which contacts with the bottom face of said piston, and the confined liquid is thus intermittently subjected to pressure which is transmitted to the elastic tube 1, so as to expand said tube.

It will be understood that the expansion is due to the mechanical pressure on the confined operating fluid, and that the return motion of the tube is due mainly to its elasticity, aided by the pressure of the liquid surrounding the elastic tube, and also aided by the effect of the upward motion of the piston which tends to draw the operating fluid into the cylinder 36.

Attention is directed to the condition existing at opposite sides of the elastic tube 1. The pressure due to the weight of the confined operating liquid is exerted on the inner face of the elastic tube, and this pressure tends to expand said tube. However, this pressure may be approximately balanced by the weight of the elevated body of liquid contacting with the outer face of said elastic tube, so as to approximately equalize the liquid pressure at opposite sides of said tube. This condition exists when the elastic tube is tl leing expanded to lift the liquid from the we The elastic tube is submerged in the liquid in the well, and at certain times, the head pressure of this liquid tends to contract said tube.

The piston 37 lies between the confined operating liquid in the lower portion of the cylin der 36 and the other liquid in the upper portion of said cylinder, this other liquid being liquid elevated from the well, so the piston also serves as a booster for the elevated of the pump, to vary the flow from the well.

Figures 6 and 7 show a reservoir 47 connected to the compartment 32 which forms part of the means for confining the operating liquid. This reservoir comprises a glass cylinder 48 secured between a top head 49 and a bottom 50. A system of pipes 51 extends from the top of the compartment 32 to the bottom of the reservoir 47. A vertical tube 52, screwed into the bottom 50, extends through the top head 49 (Fig. 6) and is pro-.

vided with a nut 53 engaging said head 49 to unite the elements of this reservoir. A removable cap 54 is screwed'onto the upper end of the tube 52, and this tube has ports 55 near its lower end (Fig. 7 for the delivery of liquid to the pipe system 51. This pipe system contains a check valve 56 adapted to occupy the closed position shown in Fig. 7, and adapted to drop by gravity to a seat 57 where it will permit the flow of liquid from the reservoir 47 to the compartment 32. The bottom of this valve 56 has a groove 58 through which liquid may flow when the valve contacts with the seat 57.

The valve housing 59 (Figures 6 and 7) is screwed onto the pipe system 51 at a point below the check valve 56. A tube 60 leads from this valve housing to the bottom of the reservoir 47 where it extends through a stufting box 61. The relief valve is shown in Fig. 7. It comprises a check valve member 62 provided with a spring seat 63 and a spring 64 extendingfrom said seat to a plug 65 screwed into the housin 59. This plug may be adjusted to vary t e spring pressure on the relief valve. A removable cap 66 closes the outer end of the housing 59.

The relief valve member 62 is thus interposed in the course of liquid which passes from the pipe system 51 to the reservoir 47, and this valve will be opened in response to a predetermined degree of pressure to permit the discharge of portions of the operating liquid to the reservoir 47. This reservoir has a vent hole 67 at the top (Fig; 6) for the admission and discharge of air.

as follows.

Assuming that all of the liquid. is at rest, and that the piston 37 is driven by an electric motor which instantly attains its normal speed in starting. The piston 37 quickly imparts a thrust to the operating liquid in the compartment 32, and to avoid a severe shock at this operation, some of the liquid is discharged past the relief valve 62 and into the reservoir 47. The sudden thrust on this liquid closes the gravity check valve 56 (Fig. 7) in the pipe system 51, and opens the spring-pressed relief valve 62. Immediately thereafter, while the piston moves upwardly the pressure is relieved, and some or all of the discharged liquid returns by passing the gravity check valve 56.

The foregoing conditions continue with decreasing intensity while the motions of the two main bodies of liquids are being gradually synchronized, and in a short time the normal conditions are established. Actual experience has shown that the function of this well, without varying either the speed or the displacement of the pump piston 37.

For example, the spring 64 (Fig. 7) may be adjusted so that during each downward stroke of the piston 37,.some of the liquid will escape past the relief valve 62. In this event, the pressure of the confined operating liquid will'be reduced to reduce the expansion of the elastic tube 1, thereby reducing the displacement of liquid from the well. Any desired displacement below the maximum can be obtained by adjusting the spring 64. In this connection, it will be understood that the liquid forced into the reservoir 47' during a downward stroke of the piston 37 will be returned by passing ,the check valve 56 during the next upward stroke of the piston.

After the pumping system is installed in a well, the operating liquid may be supplied from any convenient source. This liquid may be introduced through the vertical tube 52 (Figures 6 and 7) in the reservoir 47, said tube having a removable cap 54 at the top. Liquid entering this tube will flow through the pipe system 51, the compartment 32, the

pipe 5, and thence into the elastic tube 1 at the bottom of the well. All of these elements should be completely filled with liquid, and all of the air should be discharged therefrom to provide a solid body ofliquid for the transmission of energy from the piston 37 to the elastic tube in the well. I

Therefore, a vent is provided to discharge the air. To illustrate this feature I have shown the piston rod 38 '(Fig.

6.) in the form of a tube open at the bottom and normally closed at the top by means of a cap 68 which is removed to discharge the air when the pulsating system is being filled with operating liquid. This vent tube permits the escape of all the air that might be otherwise trapped under the piston, and it permits the" air to be discharged from' the highest part of the elements that confine the operating liquid.

The small vent 67 (Fig; 6) in the topof the reservoir 47 is never closed, as this vent permits air to pass into and out of the reservoir. In actual practice it is convenient to maintain a reserve supply of the operating liquid in the reservoir 47 where it can be seen through the glass cylinder 48. This reserve supply will automatically compensate for a slight leakage of operating fluid at any part of the system. Moreover, the level of the liquid in the reservoir 47 serves as an indicator to show that the system contains the required amount ofoperating liquid, and in the event of leakage, additional liquid can be introduced through the tube 52 shown in Figures 6 and 7. i

I claim: 7

1. A pump comprising a conductor through which fluid to be pumped is transmitted, a pulsator wherein an operating fluid is confined, said pulsator comprising an elastic member in said conductor, an abutment separated from the outer face of said elastic member to limit the expansion thereof, and means whereby pressure is intermittently applied to said operating fluid, so as to pulsate said elastic member.

2. A pump comprising a chamber through which fluid to be pumped is transmitted, a

plied to said operating fluid, so as to pulsate said elastic member, said abutment being ported to receive the fluid to be pumped.

i 3. A pump comprising a chamber through which fluid to be pumped is transmitted, a

pulsator wherein an operating fluid is confined, said pulsator comprising an elastic tube in said chamber, a rigid abutment tube separated from the outer face of said elastic tube to limit the expansion thereof, said rigid abutment tube being ported to receive the fluid to be pumped, and means whereby pressure is intermittently applied to said operating fluid, so asto pulsate said elastic member.

4. A pump comprising a conductor for the fluid to be pumped, said conductor including a chamber provided with inlet and discharge valves, a conductor wherein an operating fluid is confined, the last mentioned conductor including an elastic tube in said chamber, and

to contact with the inner face of said elastic tube, said rigid inner tube being provided with ports through which portions of the confined operating fluid pass to said elastic tube, said elastic tube having sealing means to prevent leakage of the confined operating fluid, a rigid outer tube surrounding said elastic tube and having ports for the admission and discharge of the fluid to be pumped,

10 said rigid outer tube having an inner abutment face whereby the expansion of the elastic tube is limited, and means whereby pressure is intermittently applied to said operating fluid so as to pulsate the elastic tube.

In testimony that I claim the foregoing I hereunto aflix my signature.

CLAUDE G. HOLT.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2435179 *Mar 25, 1946Jan 27, 1948Multiscope IncOil well pump
US2478568 *Mar 8, 1946Aug 9, 1949Coe Harrison SPumping apparatus
US2489505 *Nov 28, 1944Nov 29, 1949Schmidt Benjamin FDeep well pump
US2531330 *Oct 11, 1945Nov 21, 1950Louis G SimmonsFluid actuated injection means
US2606500 *Jun 24, 1946Aug 12, 1952Schmidt Benjamin FFluid actuated double-acting submersible pump
US2738731 *Jun 23, 1950Mar 20, 1956Browne Lindsay HPumps
US3317141 *Oct 26, 1964May 2, 1967Carl MannAirless liquid spray gun having a diaphragm pump and filtering apparatus
US4856510 *Apr 6, 1988Aug 15, 1989Kowalewski Ryszard JTracheal tube inflator
US4886428 *Aug 24, 1988Dec 12, 1989Olofsson BjoernPump arrangement, particularly for pumping water from deep wells
US4974674 *Mar 21, 1989Dec 4, 1990Westinghouse Electric Corp.Extraction system with a pump having an elastic rebound inner tube
US5522463 *Aug 25, 1994Jun 4, 1996Barbee; PhilDownhole oil well pump apparatus
Classifications
U.S. Classification417/388, 417/383, 417/392, 417/254, 417/474, 417/394
International ClassificationF04B43/10, F04B43/00
Cooperative ClassificationF04B43/10
European ClassificationF04B43/10