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Publication numberUS1855622 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 26, 1932
Filing dateFeb 18, 1929
Priority dateFeb 18, 1929
Publication numberUS 1855622 A, US 1855622A, US-A-1855622, US1855622 A, US1855622A
InventorsLewis C Brooks
Original AssigneeNat Paper Can Company
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Container and method of making the same
US 1855622 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

April 26, 1932.

L. c. BROOKS 55,622

CONTAINER AND METHOD OF MAKING THE SAME Filed Feb. 18, 1929 5 I l. 6 I 2 I I! 7 Hill HINT N I I I 3 6 .9 4 7 I l I ll 78 h g J I J Patented Apr. 26, 1932 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE LEWIS C. BROOKS, OF MILWAUKEE, WISCONSIN, ASSIGNOR TO NATIONAL PAPER CAN COMPANY, OF MILWAUKEE, WISCONSIN, A CORPORATION OF DELAWARE CONTAINER AND METHOD OF MAKING THE SAME Application filed February 18, 1929. Serial No. 340,890.

This invention relates to containers and a method of making the same. It relates more particularly to containers made of flexible or workable material and to a closure therefor and a method of attaching such closure to a container.

Containers made of flexible or workable material such, for example, as fiber, and which are provided with closures intended to make them liquid-tight, are well-known.

One purpose of the present invention is to provide a container of such nature having an improved liquid-tightelosure.

Containers having closures employing a pair of closure discs. or members are also known, but such containers have been found not to be as liquid-tight as is desirable in many instances, due to the seepage of the liquid in the container around and between the respective closure members, thus tending to disintegrate the closure.

I provide a container, the outer wall of which is reversely turned around a portion of a closure member and tucked within a depression formed in such closure member.

I further provide a container having a plurality of closure members, the wall of the container being reversely turned and tucked between the respective closure members. The detailed features of the invention will become apparent from the following present preferred embodiment thereof.

In the accompanying drawings I have shown a present preferred embodiment of the invention wherein Figure 1 is an elevational view partly in central vertical cross-section showing the first step in the formation of a container;

Figures 2. 3 and 4 are views similar to Fig 1 and showing successive steps in the formation of a container, and

Figure 5 is a perspective view partly in central vertical cross-section and to enlarged scale showing a portion of my completed closure.

Referring more particularly to the drawings wherein for sake of illustration a. container formed of fibrous material is shown, reference numeral 2 designates generally a spindle over which the material forming the body of the container is placed, and which serves as a matrix for the container. The top of the spindle is shown at 3 and is provided with a beveled periphery 4.

A tubular length of material 5 is placed over the spindle 2 with a portion of it extending upwardly above the top 3 of the spindle. A flanged closure member 6 adapted to fit within the tubular length of material 5 and having a circumferential upstanding flange 7 is placed within the tube and against the top of the spindle as shown in Figure 1.

The portion of the closure member .6 to which the flange 7 is attached projects outwardly and above the beveled portion 4 of the spindle. By means of a suitable die (not shown) the portion of the tube 5 projecting above the flange 7 of the closure member is turned inwardly and downwardly and inside the flange 7. At the same time the periphery of the flange is de ressed at the beveled portion 4 of the spin dle, forming a depression 8 in the closure member into which the extremity of the tube -5 is tucked, as shown in Figure 2. The depression in the closure member is of such size as to snugly receive the inturned extremity of thetube so that a tight joint is formed between the tube and the closure member 6.

After the extremity of the tube has been turned inwardly and tucked within the depression 8 in the flanged closure member, a second substantially flat closure member 9 is introduced within the inturned portion of the tube and is of such size as to snugly fit within and against the flanged closure memher 6 and to abut the inturned portion of the tube at its periphery. The fit of the substantially flat closure member 9 may be and preferably is sufliciently snug that a completed tion of such closure member.

closure member 6.

closure may be formed merely by the inser- The abutment of the member 9 against'the inturned portion of the 'tube 5 counteracts any tendency of such portion of the tube to curl up inward- 1y, although such tendency is slight, due to the snug tucking of the end of the tube within the depression 8, as above mentioned. The closure formed after the insertion of the closure member 9 is shown in Figure 3.

Although the container and closure shown in Figure 3 are preferably strong enough to constitute a finished container and may be used as such, I prefer to even further strengthen the container and closure by folding inwardly the upstanding tripple thickness comprising the outer and inner thicknesses of the tube 5 and the flange of the This folding operation may be performed by a suitable die (not shown) which firmly presses the inwardly turned portion of the container against the outer face of the substantially flat closure low the member 9. Theinward folding of the two thicknesses ofthe container wall and the flange of the closure member 6 also more tightly presses the extremity of the wall within the depression 8 and establishes more firm contact between the respective thicknesses of the material of which the container is made, thereby making it more effectively liquid-tight. I

The closure member 9 is not an essential of my invention, although use of such a closure member is preferred. For example a construction such as that of Figure 4 but in which the closure member 9 is omitted and the reversely turned wall portion'and the flange of the closure member 6 are folded inwardly together includes advantages of the invention.

Figure 5 shows to enlarged scale the completed closure still in place upon the spindle 2. When the container thus formed is removed from the spindle, it is found to have great strength and rigidity and to be perfectly liquid-tight. The container may be used either for liquids or for solid matter as desired.

A bead may be formed in the container either substantially op osite or slightly belane of the clbsure member 9, but I have ound that when the container is constructed as above described and as shown in the drawings, it is sufiiciently strong for all practical purposes and that, in fact, the addition of such a bead does not materially add to its strength.

While I have shown and described a present preferred embodiment of the invention, it is to be distinctly understood that the same is not limited thereto, as, for instance, the material of which the container is made may be other than fibrous material such, for example, as the workable metals, and the container and closure may be otherwise embodied and the method otherwise practiced within the scope of the following claim.

I claim:

1. A container having a reversely turned wall and a plurality of closure members within the wall, the reversely turned portion of the wall being tucked between the outer wall portion and at least a portion of each of the closure members.

2. A container having a reversely turned wall, a flanged closure member within the wall, the flan e of the closure member being at least partially disposed outside the reversely turned wall portion, and a second closure member within the wall, the reversely turnedwall portion being tucked between the outer wall portion and at least a portion of each of the closure members.

3. A container having a closure member a portion of which adjacent its periphery is depressed substantially in the direction of the container body, the extremity of the container wall being tucked within such depression, and a second closure member against the wall and outside the first mentioned clo sure member.

4. A container having a flanged closure member depressed substantially in the direc- .tion of the container body, the extremity of the container wall extending around the flange and being tucked within such depression, and a second closure member outside the first and bearing against thewall.

s 5. A container having a flanged closure member depressed adjacent the flange substantially in the direction of the container body, the container wall being turned around the flange and tucked within the depression, and a flat closure member bearing against the first mentioned closure member and within the wall.

6. A container having a closure member depressed adjacent its periphery substantially in the direction of the container body, the end of the container wall being tucked within the depression, the'container wall and closure member being folded inwardly together to form a tight closure.

7. A container having a flanged closure member, the container wall being turned around the flange, the wall and flange being folded inwardly together to form a tight joint. 8. A container having a flanged closure member, the container wall extending around the end of the flange to form a portion of triple thickness, such portion .being bent around to form a tight joint.

9. A container having a body portion and a flanged closure member fitting therein, the body portion extending around the end of the flange, the flange and at least one thickness of the body portion being bent around to form a tight closure.

10. A container having a plurality of closure members, at least one of which is recessed, the container wall bein tucked between such closure memberswiti its extremity fitting within such recess.

11. A container having a flanged closure member, the container wall being turned around the flange, and a second closure member pressing the well against the flanged closure member, the flanged closure member and the Wall being turned over to form a tight closure.

12. A container having a flanged closure member depressed adjacent the flange, the container wall extending around the flange and into the depression, and a second closure member within the flanged closure member, the wall and flange being turned against the second closure member.

13. In a method of making a container, the steps comprising placing a closure member within a container body, turning the end of the body around the closure member, and folding over the body and closure member together to form a tight joint.

14. In a method of making a container, the steps comprising placing a flanged closure member within a container body, depressing the closure member substantially in the direction of the container body, turning the end of the body around the flange and tucking it into the depression, and folding over the body and flange to form a tight joint.

15. In a method of making a container, the steps comprising placing a closure member within a container body, turning the body over the closure member, introducing a supplemental closure member and foldin over the first mentioned closure member an body upon the supplemental closure member.

16. In a method of making a container, the steps comprising placing a closure member within a container body, depressing the closure member, turning the body over the closure member and tucking an extremity thereof into the depression, introducing a supplemental closure member and folding over the first mentioned closure member and body upon the supplemental closure member.

17. A container having a flanged closure member, the container wall being turned around the flange, and a second closure member pressin the wall against the flanged closure mem er at a point removed from the end of the container, the portion beyond the second closure member toward the end of the container being compressed so as to extend inwardly a substantial distance toward the axis of the container beyond the rim of the second closure member.

18. A container having a flanged closure member depressed in the direction of the length of the container adjacent the flan e, the container wall being turned around t e flange and having its extremity tucked into the depression in the flanged closure member, and a second closure member pressing the wall against the flanged closure member at a point removed from the end of the container, the portion beyond the second closure member toward the end of the container being compressed so as to extend inwardly a substantial distance toward the axis of the container beyond the rim of the second 010- sure member.

In testimony whereof I have hereunto set In hand.

y LEWIS O. BROOKS.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3869966 *Nov 22, 1972Mar 11, 1975Brandigi CarloMethod for forming a shaped cover for a flask
US4127059 *Jun 6, 1977Nov 28, 1978Phillips Petroleum CompanyMethod of forming a container
Classifications
U.S. Classification493/109, 493/114, 493/158, 229/5.6
International ClassificationB31B17/00
Cooperative ClassificationB31B17/00, B31B2217/082
European ClassificationB31B17/00