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Publication numberUS1856098 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 3, 1932
Filing dateMay 29, 1930
Priority dateMay 29, 1930
Publication numberUS 1856098 A, US 1856098A, US-A-1856098, US1856098 A, US1856098A
InventorsStanley S Green
Original AssigneeStanley S Green
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Novelty lamp
US 1856098 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

y 3, 1932 s7 5. GREEN A 1,856,098

NOVELTY LAMP Filed May 29, 1930 JTHNLE 5.6mm,

Patented May 3, 1932 UNITED STATES PATENT orr cs STANLEY s ennmw, or LA murmurs, INDIANA Home! LAMP Application filed Kay 29, 1930. Serial in. 456,844.

It is the object of my invention to produce a novelty lamp which will have an unusual and attractive appearance.

In carrying out my invention, I associate with a source of light and heat a vessel hav ing light-transmitting walls and containing a supply of liquid, the vessel being disposed in such a position relative to thelight-source that light emanating therefrom" will pass through the vessel, while the heat which the vessel receives will raise the temperature of the liquid to the boiling point. Conveniently, the liquid within the vessel is water and the vessel is sealed and evacuated to a point where the water will boil at the tem to which the liquid is raised by heat rom the light-source. The liquid in the vessel may be clear or colored; and if desired, it may contain granules or flakes of insoluble material which will be agitated by the ebullition of the liquid.

The accompanying drawings illustrate my,

invention, all the three figures being side elevations of three difierent lamp-constructions in wh ch my invention is embodied.

The construction illustrated in Fig. 1 cmbodies an electric lamp-bulb 10 mounted in a suitable base 11, which base may be of any desired form. The closed liquid-containing vessel 12 in this construction resembles in outward appearance a not unusual type of lamp shade, the vessel being supported from the lamp base 11 by any su table supporting means such as the spaced fingers 13.

The bottom wall of the vessel 12 is provided with a re-entrant portion 14 forming a pocket for the reception of the upper end of the lamp bulb 10. The vessel 12, after having had a supply of liquid introduced into it, is evacuated if necessary and sealed.

in the lamp illustrated in Fig. 2, a lamp bulb 20 is mounted in a base 21 which, at its upper end, is provided with a cup 23 the side walls of which extend upwardly beyond the top of the lamp bulb 20. The liquideontaining vessel 24 is shown as of spherical shape. Like the vessel 12 shown in Fig. 1, the vessel 24 contains a supply of liquid and is partially evacuated, if necessary, and sealed.

erature If desired, the cup 23 may be with a light-reflecting linin 25, an the upper portion of the inner sur ace of the vessel 24 ma also be provided with a coating 26 of lig t-reflecting material. For the purpose of maintaining the vessel 24 with the reflecting material 26 at its top, the vessel may be provided with a bead 27 which fits closely within the upper edge of the cup 23. If desired, the lamp illustrated in Fig. 2 may be provided with a shade 28.

In the lamp shown in Fig. 3, the same lamp-bulb 20, base 21, and cup 23 embodied in the lamp of Fig. 2 may be used. The liquid-containing vessel, however, is of a different shape, as it comprises an enlarged bottom portion 31 and an enlarged top portion 32 which are conn cted by a restricted, vertically extending eck 33. As in the previous instances, the vessel contains a supply of liquid which, when the lamp is not in use, occupies a part of the lower portion 31 of the liquid-containing vessel.

The lamps described are but three of many rovided forms which my invention may take. In

each lamp, a vessel with light-transmitting walls and containing a supply of liquid is mounted in association with a lamp-bulb in such a manner that light from the lamp-bulb will pass through the vessel and liquid while the liquid is heated to the boiling point by heat derived from the lamp-bulb. In order to prevent the occurrence of an equilibrium condition within the sealed vessel it is necessary that the vessel have suificient heat-radiating surface above the normal liquid level to create in the upper part of the vessel a temperature lower than the boiling point of the liquid at the pressure to which it is subjected.

When the lamp is not in operation, the fluid within it is in liquid form and collects at the bottom of the vessel. bulb is lighted, however, the temperature of the liquid is increased to the boiling point. When this occurs, thebody of the liquid be- When the lamp comes ebullient, and vapor rises to'the upper 2 bulb passes through the ebullient liquid, illuminates it, and produces a very novel and pleasing appearance.

As previously stated, the clear or colored; and it may, if desired, have suspended in itparticles of insoluble material the agitation of which in the ebullient liquid adds to the unusual and attractive appearance of the lam Like the liqiqd, the walls of the containing vessel may clear or colored.

The pressure obtaining within the liquidcontaining vessel of the lamp will depend upon the boiling point of the liquid, upon the quantity of liquid in the vessel, and upon the temperature to which the liquid is raised by heat emanating from the lamp bulb. It is practical to use water as the liquid in the sealed vessel; but if liquid of a lower boiling oint is used, the vessel need not be evacuated to so great an extent.

In referring to the liquid-containing vessel as having been exhausted or evacuated, I have in mind the removal from it of a sufiiliquid may be cient portion of any gas such as air which is non-condensable at the normal operating temperature of the lamp.

It will be appreciated that through the use of an ordinary electric lamp-bulb I have provided a single source for both the light and heat necessary in carrying out my invention; but. it will also be apparent that the necessary light and heat need not emanate from a common source, and I therefore do not restrict my invention to a single source of light and heat.

I claim as my invention:

1. A novelty lamp, comprising a source of heat and light, a closed vessel having lighttransmitting wall portions and in proximity to said source arranged to receive heat and to intercept at least part of the light emanating therefrom, and a supply of liquid within said vessel, said vessel being at least partially exhausted to reduce the gas pressure therein to a point such that the heat received by the liquid from said source will cause ebullition of the liquid.

2. A novelty lamp, comprising a source of heat and light, a closed vessel having lighttransmitting wall portions and in proximity to said source arranged to receive heat and to intercept atleast part of the light emanating therefrom, and a supply of liquid within said vessel, said liquid having a boiling point such that it will boil at the temperature and pressure conditions obtaining within said vessel.

3. A novelty lamp as set forth in claim 1 with the addition that said vessel has a heatradiating'condensing surface above the normal liquid level.

4. A novelty lamp as set forth in claim 2 with the addition that said vessel has a heatliquid.

radiating condensing surface above the normal liquid level.

5. A novelty lamp, comprising a source of light, a source of heat, a closed vessel hav-' ing light-transmitting wall portions and arranged to receive heat from said source of heat and to intercept at least part of the light emanating from said source of light, and asupply of liquid within said Vessel, said vessel being at least partially exhausted to reduce the gas pressure therein to a point such that the heat received bythe liquid from said source of heat will cause ebullition of the 6. A novelty lamp, comprising a source of light, a source of heat, a closed vessel having light-transmitting wall portions and arranged to receive heat from said source of heat and to intercept at least part of the light emanating from said source of light and a supply of liquid within said vessel, said liquid having a boiling point such that it will boil at the temperature and pressure conditions obtaining within said vessel.

7 A novelty lamp, comprising a source of heat and light, a casing for said source, said casing having a light-transmitting opening and a light-reflecting inner surface, a vessel having light-transmitting wall portions, said vessel being mounted adjacent said opening to receive heat and light from said source, and a supply of liquid within said vessel, said liquidhaving a boiling point such that it will boil at the temperature and pressure conditions obtaining within said vessel.

8. A novelty lamp as set forth in claim 2 with the addition that said vessel is provided with a re-entrant portion in which the source of heat and light is located.

. 9. A novelty lamp as set forth in claim 7 with the addition that said vessel is formed to provide a lower liquid-containing chamber located adjacent said opening, an upper condensing chamber, and a restricted neck connecting said two chambers.

In witness whereof, I STANLEY GREEN have hereunto set my hand at La Fayette, Indiana, this 20th da of May, A. D. one thousand nine hundre and thirty- STANLEY S. GREEN.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2434774 *Sep 26, 1945Jan 20, 1948John J SigmanVictory light
US2741693 *Jan 29, 1952Apr 10, 1956Emil C FassonIlluminated dynamic fluid ornamental device
US3325935 *Sep 22, 1964Jun 20, 1967John P MckennaLamp
US3387396 *Mar 4, 1965Jun 11, 1968Crestworth LtdDisplay devices
US3464132 *Jan 24, 1967Sep 2, 1969Kalliroscope CorpGraphic display
US3531635 *Oct 19, 1967Sep 29, 1970Mastercrafters Clock CorpOrnamental convection lamp
US3593444 *Nov 25, 1968Jul 20, 1971Akrongold Harold SVisual displays
US4133124 *Aug 18, 1976Jan 9, 1979Karl ChangDisplay device
US5596827 *Aug 25, 1995Jan 28, 1997Boulos; Daniel M.Device for making a liquid appear to rise up a tube
US5778576 *Sep 13, 1996Jul 14, 1998Spencer GiftsNovelty lamp
US6269566 *Dec 21, 1999Aug 7, 2001Single-Tree Art Industry Co., Ltd.Glass water ball with light emitting device
US6488393Oct 23, 2000Dec 3, 2002David J. BurnhamDisplay lamp and method
US6681508Mar 14, 2002Jan 27, 2004Massachusetts Institute Of TechnologyVisual display device
US6955441 *Mar 11, 2004Oct 18, 2005Ching-Chao ChenOrnamental tube for decorative lamp assembly
US20020174577 *Mar 14, 2002Nov 28, 2002Massachusetts Institute Of TechnologyVisual display device
US20040095775 *Jul 28, 2003May 20, 2004Monitto Perry H.Floor lamp
US20070246098 *Mar 21, 2007Oct 25, 2007Burke Gregory E JrDecorative Motion Lamp
US20090122549 *Aug 1, 2008May 14, 2009Lite-On It CorporationLighting Device and Operating Method Thereof
Classifications
U.S. Classification40/406, 362/806, 446/220, 362/318, 446/14
International ClassificationF21S10/00
Cooperative ClassificationY10S362/806, F21S10/002
European ClassificationF21S10/00A