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Publication numberUS1859229 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 17, 1932
Filing dateDec 27, 1929
Priority dateDec 27, 1929
Publication numberUS 1859229 A, US 1859229A, US-A-1859229, US1859229 A, US1859229A
InventorsBonine Charles E
Original AssigneeJames H Bell
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Liquid cooling apparatus
US 1859229 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

May 17, 1932. BONINE 1,859,229

LIQUID COOLING APPARATUS Filed Dec. 27, 1929 3 Sheets-Sheet 1 FIG. I.

13 33 Z 50 Z92 52 55 V 12 22 15 WITNESSES INVENTOR: Cizarlesfifiozzzzze S BY May 17, 1932. C. E. BONINE 1,859,229

I LIQUID COOLING APPARATUS Filed Dec. 27. 1929 s Sheets-Sheet 2 WITNESSES ,I'NVENTOR:

TTORNEYS.

May 17, 1932. Q E BONlNE 1,859,229

LIQUID COOLING APPARATUS Filed Dec. 27, 1929 3 Sheets-Sheet 3 FICi M WITNESSES I N VEN TOR.-

TTORNEYS.

Patented May 17, 1932 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE CHARLES E. BONINE, 01E MELROSE PARK, CHELTENHAM TOWNSHIP, MONTGOMERY COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA, ASSIGNOR TO JAMES H. BELL, PHILADELPHIA, PENN- i 7 With reference first SYLVAN IA LIQUID COOLING APPARATUS Application filed December 27, 1929. Serial No.,416,'773.

This invention relates to apparatus for cooling water or other liquids, and has reference more particularly to coolers designed for use of dry ices such as exemplified by solidified carbon dioxide.

The chief aim of my invention is to render more practical than heretofore, use of refrigerants of the kind referred to in cooling water and other liquids through provision of a cooling apparatus which is structurally simple, reliable in operation, economic as regards consumption of the refrigerant, and wherein the chilling effect is produced indirectly, i. e. by circulation of the cold free gas sublimated from the refrigerant around the reservoir containing the liquid undergoing cooling, rather than by direct contact of the refrigerant itself with the reservoir, to the advantage of efiectively precluding the possibility of freezing the liquid.

I further aim, in connection with a cooler operative under the above principle, topredetermine circulation of the refrigerating gas in a direction counter to flow of the liquid in the reservoir, thereby to promote more uniform thermic interchange with corresponding enhancement in the efliciency of the apparatus.

Still other objects and attendant advantages of this invention will be manifest from the detailed description following when considered in connection with the attached drawings, wherein Fig. I is a sectional view of a liquid cooling apparatus conveniently embodying my present improvements.

Fig. II is a plan view of the same.

Fig. III is an elevation of the left hand end of the structure as considered in Fig. I, with parts broken away to bett'er disclose otherwise hidden features; and, r

Fig. IV is a view somewhat similar to Fig. I but showing an alternative form of. my invention.

more particularly to Figs. I, II and III of these illustrations,.the numeral 5 designates a reservoir which, in the present instance, is made from ceramic material to rectangular configuration. Communicating into the reservoir. 5 through a metallic coupling 6, is a bell 7 likewise made from ceramic material and adapted to receive the mouth of an inverted supply con- 'tainer 8. -As shown, the reservoir 5 and the hell 7 are surrounded by an insulate casing generally designated by the numeral 9, the

same being formed of cork or other suitable thermo-insulation 10 and protected on the outside by a sheathing 11 of metal. To ren- 'der the casing 9 gas tight, the joints areall sealed with a suitable cementitious substance as at 12, and a coating of like material applied to the insides of its walls as at 13. At the interior, the casing 9 afiords a space 15 above the reservoir 5 for a charge G of solid carbon dioxide, here shown as being in block form,with interposition of insulation at 16 and .17 to prevent direct contact of the refrigerant G with either the reservoir 5 or the bell 7 the insulation 17 being U-shaped in crosssection, as shown in dotted lines in Fig. II, so as to surround said bell. The casing 9 also affords passages 18, 19, 20, 21, 22 along the sides (Fig. III), ends and bottom (Fig. I) of the reservoir 5, as well as a communicating clearance 23 around the hell 7, which "clearance leads to the exterior at the top of structed from a plurality of layers of felt sewed together by stitching conventionally indicated at 27, and it is liftable by a ring 28 which is secured by means of a clip 29 en gaged through an aperture in a sheet metal plate 30 constituting thetop of said plug.

The casing 9 is fitted with a cover lid com-' prising counter part sections 31 which meet along the longitudinal medial plane of'the structure as shown in Fig. II, said lid sections having down turned flanges 32 to overlap the sides of the casing 9, and attached angle lugs 33 to prevent their displacement relatively,

Referring to Fig. I, it will be observed that the coupling 6 comprises a tubular nipple 35 which is threaded for engagement by nuts 36, 37, adapted, through interposed washers 38, 39 to compress sleeves 40, 41 of rubber or the like into liquid tight contact with the sides of apertures 42, 43 respectively provided for the ends of the nipple in the reservoir 5 and the bell 7. The nuts 36, 37 are also instrumental in clamping, between the reservoir 5 and the bell 7, a spacing element having the form of a tripod 45.

Water is drawn from the reservoir 5 under control of a plunger operated faucet46 attached to the outer end of another tubular nipple 47 which leads horizontally through the side wall of the casing 9. As shown, the nipple 47 has a fiuidtight connection at 48 with the reservoir 5 similar in construction to the fluid tight juncture means employed with the coupling 6. V v

' The operation of the cooler is as follows: As the cold heavier-thanair free gas sublimates from the charge C of solid carbon dioxide in the space 15, it descends down along the sides 18, 19 (Fig. II) and left hand end 20 (Fig. I) of the reservoir 5 and then passes horizontally through the passage 22 beneath said reservoir to the passage. 21 at the outside atmosphere; all as shown by the arrows in Fig.'I. The cold gas thus circulates around the reservoir 5 and the bell 7 in a direction counter to the flow of the water in them, thereby cooling the water to a palatable temperature suitable fordrinking purposes, the danger of freezing being precluded by avoidance of direct contact of the refrigerant C with either the reservoir 5 or the bell 7 as a consequence of interposition of the insulation at 16 and at 17. g r

, In the alternative form of my invention passing upward through the insulation 10a.

.Themeans here employed to insure water tightness atthe junctures of theinlet pipe 6a and the drain pipe 47 a with the reservoir 5a are identical to those described in connection with the first embodiment. In the present instance, escape of the spent refrigerating gas takes place through a small duct 2311 that extends up through the insulation from thetop of the passage 21a at the right hand end of the reservoir 5a. Except for the difnumerals previously employed with addition of the subscript a.

a direction counter tothe flow of of the reservoir, and communicating passages about said reservoir for the free circulation of the gas sublimated from the refrigerant in a direction counter to the flow of the liquid therein.

2. In liquid coolingapparatus, areservoir for traverse of the liquid which to be cooled; and a surroundin .thermo-insulating casing'provldmg a space or a chargeof solid carbon dioxide, and passages determinlng circulation of the cold free gas sublimated from the refrigerant around'said reservoir in V the llquid there n. i

3. In liquid cooling apparatus, aclos'ed reservoir for traverse of the liquid which is to be cooled; a bell communicating into the reservoir and adapted to receive the mouth of an inverted supply container and arsurrounding thermo-ins'ulating casing providing =a space'fora charge of solid carbon dioxide and continuous passages determining flow of the cold free gas sublimated from the refrigerant around the reservoir and the bell in a direction counter to the flow of the liquid in them.

r 4. In liquid cooling apparatus, "a closed reservoir for' traverse of the liquid which'is to be cooled,- a removable bell communicating into the reservoir by way of a coupling nipple. 'with a fluid-tight connection and adapted to shown in Fig. IV, the bell of the first del scribed form is supplanted by a pipe connection 6a for leading water from a housemain directly into the reservoir 5a, said pipe con- V nection entering the casing at the bottom and receivethe mouth of an invertedsupplycou container; and a surrounding thermo-insulating casing affording a superposedsp'ace for a 7 charge of solid carbon dioxide with interposition of insulation preventingdirect contact of the refrigerant with either the reservoir or the bell, and passages about said reservoir and bell for free circulation of the gas sublimated from the refrigerant in a directioncounter to the flow of the liquid being cooled.

5. In liquid cooling apparatus, a closed reservoir for traverse of the liquid. which is to be cooled; a bell communicating into the reservoir and adapted toreceive the mouth of an inverted supply container; and a surrounding thermo-insulating casing affording a space for a charge of solid carbon dioxide with interposition of insulation preventing direct contact of the refrigerant with either the reservoir or the bell, and passages deter- 'mining flow of the cold free gas sublimated from the refrigerant about said reservoir and bell m a direction counter to theofl-ow' of the liquid in them.

6. In liquid cooling apparatus, aclos'ed reservoir for traverse of the liquid which is to be cooled, a bell communicating into the reservoir and adapted to receive the mouth of an inverted supply container; and a surrounding thermo-insulating casing afl'ording a space for a charge of solid carbon dioxide, passages around the reservoir for circulation of the cold free gas Sublimated from the refrigerant, and a communicating clearance around the bell for escape of the gas to the exterior of the refrigerator. 7

7. In liquid cooling apparatus a closed ceramic reservoir for traverse of the liquid which is to be cooled; a ceramic bell communicating into the reservoir through a metallic coupling and adapted to receive the mouth of an inverted supply container and a surrounding thermo-insulating casing aifording a space for a charge of solid carbon dioxide, and passages about said reservoir and bell for circulation of the cold free gas sublimated from the refrigerant.

8. In liquid cooling apparatus, a closed reservoir for traverse of the liquid which is to be cooled; an inlet leading into the reservoir; and a surrounding thermo-insulating casing providing a space for a charge of solid carbon dioxide, and communicating passages determining flow of the cold free gas sublimated from the refrigerant around the reservoir and the inlet in a direction counter to the flow of liquid in them. 7

9. In liquid cooling apparatus, a closed ceramic reservoir for traverse of the liquid which is to be cooled; a similar material bell communicating into the reservoir and adapted to receive the mouth of an inverted supply container; and a surrounding thermo-insulat ing casing providing a space for a charge of solid carbon dioxide with interposition of insulation above and out of direct contact with the reservoir, and continuous passages about the reservoir and the bell for circulation of the cold free gas Sublimated from the refrigerant.

In testimony whereof, I have hereunto signed my name at Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, this 23rd day of December, 1929.

CHARLES E. BONINE. I

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2763994 *Jul 30, 1952Sep 25, 1956Peter Fries JrFluid cooling and carbonating devices
US5111966 *May 18, 1990May 12, 1992Kelco Water Engineering, Inc.Water dispenser
Classifications
U.S. Classification62/386, 62/387, 62/383, 62/397
International ClassificationF25D3/12, F25D3/00, B67D3/00
Cooperative ClassificationB67D3/0009, F25D3/12
European ClassificationF25D3/12, B67D3/00C