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Publication numberUS1859354 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 24, 1932
Filing dateJan 15, 1930
Priority dateJan 15, 1930
Publication numberUS 1859354 A, US 1859354A, US-A-1859354, US1859354 A, US1859354A
InventorsButtress George A
Original AssigneeF And B Holding Company
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Means for forming facing sheets for fabricated laths
US 1859354 A
Abstract  available in
Images(4)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

5. A. BUTTRESS 1,859,354

May 24, 1932.

Q MEANS FOR FORMING FACING SHEETS FOR FABRICATED; LATE Filed Jan. 15, 1930 4 Sheets-Sheet 1 m M fa 7 w 0 4 May 24, 1932. G, A, BUTTRES 1 1,859,354

MEANS FOR FORMING FACING SHEETS FOR FABRLCATED LATH Filed Jan. 15, 1930 Sheets-Sheet 2 Invenfar. 6eor;g"Q/1..Bulfress y 24, 1932- G. Av BUTTRESS 1,859,354

MEANS FOR FORMING FACING SHEETS FOR FABRICATED LATH Filed Jan. 15, 1950 4 Sheets-Sheet 4 I .19. 60 as a w 9,? 9%

Patented May 24, 1932 UNITED s'ra'r zs PATENT OFFICE GEORGE A. BUTTRESS, OF LOS ANGELES, CALIIE'QRNIA, ABSIGNOR T It AN D B. EOIIDIN COMPANY, OF LOS ANGELES, CALIFORNIA, A CORPORATION OF CALIFORNIA- I MEANS FOR FORMING FACING SHEETS FOR IAN-EH i Application filed January is, 1930. Serial no. 420,964.

This invention relates to means and method for making a facing sheet for fabricated lath and more particularly pertains'to the manufacture of a corrugated fibrous sheet for the 5 reception of a plastic composition in form'- ing a sheet lath such as is set forth in my copending ap lication for United States Patent, Serial Flo 236,081, allowed. November 1,

An object of the invention is to provide a means and method of forming a ribbonof sheet fibrous material; such as paper, with longitudinally extending flutes or channels whereby such flutes orchannels will extend 1 longitudinally in the direction of the grain of the sheet material so as to minimize the ossibility of breaking of the fibers of the s eet at the bends thereof and obviating anV necessity of scoring the sheet as is general y required where flexible fibrous sheet material such as pulp-board is bent to form corrugations extending transversely of the grain thereof.

, Another object is to provide a means and method whereby the forming of a ribbon of sheet material with longitudinally extending corrugations or flutes may be efiected in a continuous operation' Another object is to provide a means and method for converting a flat ribbon of sheet fibrous material into a corrugated ribbon having longitudinally extending flutes or channels in which the sheet material will be subjected to little or no stretchin footing the formation of the fiutes or channels and whereby weakening of the material as would ordinarily occur by reason of stretching same is obviated.

I Another object is to provide a means and method of forming a sheet fibrous material with corrugations or flutes of substantially rectangular cross-section and 7 whereby the sheet material is gradually drawn and worked to the required shape in such manner to avoid rupture of the sheet material during working thereof. I

With the foregoing objects in view, together with such other objects and advantages as may subsequently appear, the invention resides in the steps and features herein action in efafter set forth and claimed and illustrated by way of examglle in. the accompanying drawings in whic Fig. 1 is a vIan view illustrating a mechamsm for, an the manner of, carrying the invention into efiect;

' Fig. 2 is a detail in cross-section illustrat- I mg a flat sheet of fibrous material previous to effecting corrugation thereof;

Fig. 3 is adetail in cross-section of the sheet material as seen on the line 33 of Fig. 1, illustrating the manner of initially forming a corrugation;

Fi 4.- is a detail in cross-section as seen on the line 4-4 of Fig. 1 illustrating a second step of Working the sheet material;

Fig. 5 is a view in section taken on the line 5- 5 of Fig. 1 showing the third step of working the material;

Fig. 6v is a view in section as seen on the line 66 showing the fourth step of working the material; I

Fig. 7 is a view in section taken on the line 77 of Fig. 1 showing the fifth step ofworkingwthe material;

1g. 8 is a view in section taken on the line 88 of Fig. 1 showing the last step of formmg the material;

Fig. 9 is a view in section illustrating the first and second steps employed in forming the sheet material with a corrugation;

F1 10 is a detail in section illustrating the nal step of forming the sheet material into a rectangular corrugation;

Fig. 11 is a detail in section and elevation as seen on the line 11-11 of Fig. 1; v

Fig. 12 is a view in section and elevation taken on the line 1212 ofFig. 1;

Fig. 13 is a view in section and elevation taken on the line 13-13 of Fig. 1;

Fig. 14 is a plan view illustrating anotherform of mechanism for carrying the invention into effect;

Fig. 15 is a view insection as seen on the line 1515 of Fig. 1*;

Fig. 16 is a view in section as seen on the line 16-46 of Fig. 14; 1

Fig. 17 is a view in section as seen on the line 17-17 of Fig. 14;

Fig'. 18 is'a view in section as seen on the line 1818 of Fig. 14;

Fig. 19 is a plan view illustrating a further modification of the invention;

Fig. 20 is a diagrammatic view in longitudinal section taken on the line 20-20 of Fig. 19; I

ig: 21'" is a view in sectionass line 24-24 of Fig.

orstrip of plain sheet fibrous material,'such as paper or' pulp board of the character em- Fig. 25 is a view in section as seen onv the line 25-25 of 20;

. 26' is aview'j'in section as seen on the 1i'ne'26 26 of Fig. 20;

Fig. 27 is a detail in section and elevation illustratinga modified form of the forming rollers employed in the structure illustrated in Fig. 19.

'I'he meth'od constituting the present inventioncorisists generally in taking a ribbon ployed in the manufacture of compositionwall boards, and subjecting the sheet to suecessive operations whereby the plain sheet is converted ifntoa ribbon or strip having a series'of longitudinally extending flutes or corrugations of substantially rectangular cross sections. *Ashere shown, theribbon' is initially formedwith a series of channels or grooves of arcuateor curved cross section by drawing or "gathering the sheet transversely,

& and finally working the walls of the channels or grooves to form flutes or corrugations of substantially rectangular cross section. The invention contemplates forming the channels or grooves and the finished flutesor corruga tions r ithout materially stretching the stock of the fibrous sheet while so doing and while continuously advancing the sheet."

In carrying out the method, a ribbonof sheet fibrous material is pulled long tudinally between a series of sets of suitable form'- ing devices and therebyinitially formed with one or more longitudinal channels or rooves of arcuate or curved cross section; t e material of the ribbonbeing pulled or gathered inwardly from its margins to form the walls of the channels orgrooves without stretching the material. The stock constituting the channels or grooves is then worked to .convert the channels or grooves'of arcuate cross section into flutes or corrugations of substantially rectangular cross section, whereby the stock constituting the curved walls of the channels or grooves will then form the bottom and side walls of the flutes or corrugations and whereby the flutes or corrugations will have their walls of a transverse surface length corresponding to the transverse length channels, or grooves and the finished flutes or corrugations will extend lengthwise of the fibers or in the direction of the grain of the ,material. Because ofthis the formation of the fluted ribbon is readily-effected and without materially weakening of the material as A is the case where pulp board or paper is corrugated transversely of the grain.- Tests have shown'tha't the"product thus formed is approximately one-third stronger than where corrugated crosswise of the fibers or grains.

,The modes of carrying the invention into effect both as to the method and the mechanism, are subject to variation, several of which are here shown in Figures 1, 14 and'19 with their assoc ated views.

The mechanism employed in the form of the invention shown in Fig. 1 embodies a serie's'of spaced parallel driven shafts 30, 31, 32, 33, 34 and 35 which are rotated in unison from a driveishaft 36 geared to the driven shafts by setsofgears 37, 38, 39-,- 40, 41 and 42'. Each of the driven shafts'is fitted with a series of rollers to be later described. and arranged beneath, and extending parallel with each of the driven shafts, is a companion shaft, as indicated at 30, 31' and 32 in Fig ures 11, 12 and 13 respectively, on which companion shafts are mounted idle, rollers for cooperation with the rollers on the driven shafts. In the arrangement here shown the shaft 30 has 'fixedt'her'eon a gathering roller 43 which is formed with a transversely arched periphery and mounted on the shaft 30 beneath the roller 43 is a roller 44 formed with a peripheralfgroove of arcuate cross section. The contiguous shaft 31 is fitted with an idle roller 45 arranged with the center of its periphery in alignment with the center of the periphery of the roller 43 on the shaft 30, which roller 45 is of slightly'l'essdiameter and width than the roller 43, and which roller is formed with. a transversely curved or areaate periphery, and'loosely mounted on the shaft 31' beneath the roller 45 is a roller 46 formed with a peripheral groove of arcuate cross-section. Loosely mounted on the shaft 32 is a roller 47 arranged with the center of its eriphery in alignment with the center of the periphery of the roller 45 on the shaft 41 which roller 47 is of slightly less diameter than the roller 45 and is of corre's" onding width, and loosely mounted on the s aft '32 beneath the roller 47 is a roller 48 formed with an annular channel of rectangular cross section. The shafts 33, 34 and 35 are fitted roller 44.

rangements of rollers as specified may Mounted on the shaft on opposlte sides of the roller 47 are rollers 53 and 54 corresponding to the roller and mounted on the shaft 32" beneath the rollers 53 and 54 are rollers and 56 corresponding to the .roller 46 and loosely mounted on the shaft in alignment with the rollers 53 and 54 are rollers corresponding to the rollers 47 beneath which are rollers corresponding to the rollers 48. In like manner, gathering rollers 57 and 58 are fixed on the shaft '32 adjacent the outer sides of the rollers 53 and 54 and arranged beneath these rollers onthe shaft 32 are grooved rollers 59 and corresponding to the roller 44 and loosely mounted on the shaft 33 in central alignment with the rollers 57 and 58 are rollers 61 and 62 corresponding to the rollers 45 which cooperate with rol ers arranged therebeneath corresponding to the rollers 46. The shaft 34 carries rollers 63 and 64 aligned with the rollers 61 and 62 and arranged-therebeneath are cooperating rollers corresponding to the rollers 48. In like manner, the shafts 33, 34 and 35 are equipped respectively with forming. rollers corresponding to rol er 43 and with rollers corresponding with rollers 45 and 47. As many driven shafts with alr- )e provided as occasion may require according to the width of the ribbon of sheet fibrous material to be worked.

In the operation of the mechanism just described the ribbon A of sheet fibrous material is fed longitudinally between the several sets of rollers. The ro lers 43 and 44 are arranged on their respective shafts to be disposed approximately intermediate the side margins of the ribbon A and areso spaced in closeproximity to each other that when the ribbon A is passed therebetween the material of the ribbon will be drawn inwardly from its margins and bent downwardly to form the ribbon with an intermediate longitudinally extending channel a'of arcuate cross section, as particularly shown in Figs. 3, 9 and 11. As the ribbon advances between the rollers on the shafts 31 and 31', the rolers 45 and 46 work the stock constituting the walls of the channel a to form a groove 5 as shown in dotted lines in Fig. 9 and'in full linesin Figs. 4 and 10, which groove is of less width and depth than the channel a, then as the ribbon advances between the rollers 47 and 48 on the shafts 32 and 32' these rollers work the walls ofthe groove 5 into a flute or corrugation c of rectangular cross section as shown in Figs. 5, 10 and 13, the walls of which will have a transverse surface len 'th corresponding to the transverse surface Iength of the walls of the groove 6. In like manner the gathering rollers their associated rollers 51 and 52 act on the advancing ribbon to draw the material thereof inwardly from-its side margins to form channels (Z and eof arcuate cross section as shown in Figs. 4 and 12 which are thereafter acted on by. the rollers 53 and 54 and their associated rollers 55 and 56 to form the channe's d and e into the narrower and shallower grooves f and g as shown in ,Figs. 5 and 13, which-grooves are thereafter converted into rectangular flutes h and i as shown in Fig. 6

- by the rollers on the shaft 33 complementary to the flute-forming roller 47.

In like fashion, the ribbon is successively gathered inwardly from its margins by gathering rollers to form channels that are subsequentlv converted into the grooves and flutes as before described until the ribbon is fluted or corrugated lengthwise throughout its width as shown in Fig.8. Any suitable number of the se' 5 of the rollers are provided as occasion may' require according to the width of the ribbon being worked.

By the arrangement of rollers just described the gathering and fluting of the ribbon is effected progressively as the ribbon advances and by the provision of the gathering rollers of greater width and diameter than the groove-forming rollers, the gathering of theribbon will be of such wide area as to facilitate drawing in suflicient stock to form the groove 1; without liability of breaking of the ribbon and permits of the formation of the grooves 12 and the flutes 0 of substantial depth. However, in some instances,where the material being worked is suflieiently strong. or the flutes are uite shallow the gathering rollers may be ispensed wit in which event, the groove-forming rollers 45, 53. 54, etc. will then also serve, as gathering rol ers. t

In the form of the invention shown in Figs. 14 to 18 inclusive a series of spaced parallel driven shafts 70 are provided of any suitable number beneath each of which extends a shaft 71 and mounted on the leading shaft 70 is a gathering roller 72 which cooperates with a channeled roller 73 on the shaft 71 in gathering a ribbon advancing therebetween into a central longitudinally extending channel 7' of arcu'ate cross section,

gated throughout its width.

' be formed progressively on opposite sides of the central flute until the ribbon is corru- In the form of the invention shown in Fig.- H), a series of sets of gathering rollers and 81' are loosely mounted on shafts 82 and 83 extending in slightly diverging relation to each other which rollers 80 and 81 have transversely rounded peripheries and cooperate with :han'nel rollers 84 on shafts 85' arranged beneath the shafts 82 and 83 to form a ribbon passed therebetween into a series of longitudinallyextending channels throughout 'the' width of the ribbon. The

rollers 80 and 81, with their companion rollers 84 form channels of very shallow depth.

A series of sets of rollers 86, 87 and 88 are ar ranged successively in alignment with the rollers '80 and-8 1 with the rollers 86, 87 and 8 8 of gradually increased diameters. The rollers 86, 87 and 88 cooperate with rollers 89, 90 and 91 arranged therebeneath to effect deepening ofthe channels initially formed by the rollers 80-and 81.

Another series of rollers 92 is provided, which rollers are affixed to a driven shaft 93 to cooperate with rollers 94 on a shaft 95 to form the channels shaped by the previously named rollers into grooves of arcuate cross section, which grooves are subsequentlyconverted into flutes of rectangular cross section by a series of rollers 96 mounted on a shaft 97 cooperating with rollers 98 on a shaft 99. The various rollers preceding the set of roll-' ers 92 are sufficiently loose and spaced apart that when the ribbon is drawn therebetween the ribbon will be gathered inwardly from its margins throughout the width'thereof in forming the series of channels. In some instances, it may be desirable to substitute spheres 100 as shown in Fig. 27 for the rollers 80, 81, 86, 87 and 88 and mounting; such spheres for universal movement.

From the foregoing, it will be seen that I have produced a means and method for forming a plain ribbon or strip of sheet fibrous material into a ribbon having longitudinally extending flutes or corrugations of rectangular cross section, and whereby the product is fashioned in a manner which will permit its being produced directly from a roll of the sheet material, as well as from short strips,

65 in practically a continuous operation.

The product thus formed, while being applicable to many uses is especially designed to be employed in the manufacture of fabricated lath, by a'continuous process in which the corrugated ribbon is delivered-as formed to operators or mechanism whereby thefiutesforming the grooves into flutes of substantially rectangular cross section.

2. In a machine for forming a facing sheet for fabricated lath, means for drawing the material of a fibrous sheet into parallel grooves having curved walls, and means for forming the'grooves into flutes having substantially rectangular cross-sections of a transverse surface length corresponding to the transverse surface length of the previously formed curved walls.

In a machine for forming a facing sheet for fabricated lath, means for gathering a fibrous sheet laterally into a series of parallel channels of curved cross-section, means for reducing the channels into grooves and means for finally converting the'grooves into flutes of substantially rectangular cross section.

4 In a machine for forming a facing sheet for fabricated lath. means for gathering a fibrous sheet laterally into a-series of parall-el channels of curved cross section, means for working the channels into narrower grooves of a transverse surface length less than the transverse surface length of the previously formed channels, and means for finally converting the grooves int-o flutes of substantially rectangular cross section hav ing transverse surface length corresponding to the transverse surface length of the previously formed grooves.

5. In a machine for forming a facing sheet for fabricated lath. means for gathering a fibrous sheet laterally into a series of par allel channels of arcuate cross section, means for reducing the channels into arcuate grooves and means for finally converting the arcuate grooves into flutes of substantially rectangular cross section and to form the finished flutes to have transverse surface lengths corresponding to the transverse surface lengths of the previously formed arcuate grooves.

6. In a machine for forming a facing sheet for fabricated lath, means for gathering a ribbon of sheet fibrous material to forma series of longitudinally extending grooves in said ribbon with the grooves as initially formed of curved cross section. and means for finally working the stock constituting all) iii)

the curved walls of the grooves into corrugations of rectangular cross section having a finished transverse surface length substantially corresponding to the surface length of the previously formed grooves.

7. In a machine for making a facing sheet for fabricated lath, meansfor advancing a ribbon of sheet fibrous material including means for drawing the material transversely thereof into a series of parallel longitudinally extending channels without materially stretching the material, and means for pressing the material constituting the walls of the channels initially formed to provide the ribbon with longitudinally extending corrugations of substantially rectangular cross section.

8. In a machine for making a facing shee for fabricated lath, means for advancing a ribbon of sheet fibrous material including rollers for initially forming a longitudinally extending channel of curved wall section arranged to draw the sheet inwardy from its margins to form the wall of the channel, rollers for forming a channel paralleling the first named channel in spaced relation thereto and of corresponding cross section therewith arranged to draw the material of the sheet inwardly from. its margin, and rollers for successively and progressively forming like channels until the sheet is formed with a series of longitudinal parallel channels across the width thereof, and for forming the walls on each channel to produce corrugations-of rectangular cross section.

9. In a machine for making a facing sheet for fabricated lath, means for advancing a ribbon of sheet fibrous material including rollers for initially forming a longitudinally extending channel of curved wall section arranged to draw the sheet inwardy from its margin to form the wall of'the channel, rollers for forming a channel paralleling the first named channel in spaced relation thereto and of corresponding cross section therewith arranged to draw the material of the sheet inwardly from its margin, and rollers for successively and progressively forming like channels across the width of the sheet, means for converting the channels into narrower grooves, and means for workin the walls of the grooves to form flutes 0% rectangular cross section.

10. In a machine for making a facing sheet for fabricated lath, means for advancing a ribbon of sheet fibrous material, means for initially forming the ribbon into a series of parallel channels of arcuate cross section by gathering the material of the sheet inwardly from its margins while advancing the ribbon, and means for rolling the walls of the arcuate channels to form the ribbon with corrugations of substantially rectangular cross sections.

Iil. In a mechanism for making a facing sheet for fabricated lath from a strip of plain fibrous material, a series of rollers for gathering the strip transversely to form the latter with longitudinally extending grooves of arcuate cross section, and a series of rollers for pressing the walls of the grooves to form the latter into corrugations of rectangular cross sections.

12. In a mechanism for forming a facing sheet for fabricated lath from a plain ribbon of sheet fibrous material, a series of rollers for forming the material with a series of longitudinally extending shallow channels of arcuate cross section, a second series of rollers for formin the channels initially formed by said rst named rollers into grooves of less width than the initially formed channels, and a series of finishing rollers for converting the previously formed grooves into flutes of rectangular cross section having a transverse surface length substantially corresponding to the transverse surface length of the previously formed grooves.

GEORGE A. BUTTRESD.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2572269 *Sep 5, 1946Oct 23, 1951Maier Wellington WMethod of making matrices for simulated log structures
US2655978 *Dec 23, 1950Oct 20, 1953Holoplast LtdMethod and means for manufacturing corrugated plastic laminates
US2708958 *Nov 15, 1949May 24, 1955Robertson Co H HMethod of and apparatus for making a steel floor
US2779388 *Aug 2, 1954Jan 29, 1957Henry N QuossApparatus and method of forming elongate articles from fiberglas
US2811196 *Mar 15, 1952Oct 29, 1957Republic Steel CorpMethod and apparatus for delivering sheet material
US3064308 *Aug 27, 1958Nov 20, 1962Acoplast Kunststoff VerarbeituContinuous production of profiled plastic sheets
US5792487 *Apr 10, 1996Aug 11, 1998Witt Plastics Of Florida Inc.Corrugated plastic wall panels
US20050006816 *Jun 6, 2002Jan 13, 2005Henry DrutMethod and device for shaping a lengthwise corrugated web
US20070254058 *Apr 30, 2007Nov 1, 2007Wade A BSystems and methods for forming polymeric sheets
DE1052226B *Mar 6, 1957Mar 5, 1959Gottfried Ruegenberg Dr IngVerfahren und Vorrichtung zur Herstellung von laengs gewelltem Papier
DE1102226B *Aug 25, 1953Mar 16, 1961British Fibrak Separator CompaVerfahren und Vorrichtung zur Herstellung von gerippten Scheidern fuer elektrische Akkumulatoren
Classifications
U.S. Classification425/336, 264/286
International ClassificationB31F1/22, B31F1/20
Cooperative ClassificationB31F1/22
European ClassificationB31F1/22