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Publication numberUS1859601 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 24, 1932
Filing dateMar 23, 1929
Priority dateMar 23, 1929
Publication numberUS 1859601 A, US 1859601A, US-A-1859601, US1859601 A, US1859601A
InventorsRice George D
Original AssigneeRice George D
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Therapeutic lamp
US 1859601 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

May 24, 1 932. v G. D. RICE 1,859,601

' THERAPEUTIC LAMP Filed March 25. 1929 fray 6 225 George [7. F106 Patented May 1932 a eaonea n. RICE, or 03101160, minors 'rnnmrnurro Lmr Application fled Haroh 23, 1929. Serial No. 349,309.

This invention relates to therapeutic lamps and its primary object is to effect a saving of current and obtain maximum output of the radiated energy and particularly the invisible radiant energy.

' Another object of the invention is the provision of a generally improved and simplified construction that'may' be economically produced. Other objects and advantages of the invention will appear from the following detailed description taken in connection with the accompanying drawings, in which Figure 1 is an axial sectional View through a lamp embodying the 'present invention showing the filament and filament stem in elevation;

, Figure 2 is a transverse sectional view taken on the line 22 of Figure 1;

Figure 3 is a-fragmentary view showing another form of filament embodying the present invention;

Figure .4 is an end view of the filament and reflector shown in Figure 3 and taken from the outerend of the filament;

Figure 5 is a view similar to Figure 3 showing another form of filament embodying the presentinvention; and a Figure 6 is an end view taken from the outer end of the filament and reflector shown Figure'5.

In the drawings, 10 indicates a suitable bulb having -a suitable .base 12. The bulb 10 is preferably made of special glass designed topass maximum infra-red or other invisible radiant rays desired but this may vary. The base portion 12 is preferably of bakelite or other suitable or preferred insulating material preferably of a material which will seal well to the marginal edge of the bulb around the base opening 14. The base portion 12 is surrounded by a conducting sleeve 15 preferably of copper, brass or other suitable conductin material which may be cemented 'upon t e base and to the bulb 10. Below the base portion 12 the insulating body is preferably of asphaltum or other equivalent 1nsulating material as designated at 16 which I find provides a better seal with the ad]acent parts and surrounding the lower reduced end 18 of the insulating body is a threaded brass or other conducting sleeve 20 forming a conducting plug for threaded engagement with the ordinary light socket or outlet.

. The lead-in wires are indicated at22 and 23 and these lead-in Wires pass through and are sealed in the stem 24 and are connected at their inner ends at 25 with the filament 26. One of the wires 22 is connected at 27 with the plug contact shell 20 and the other 00 wire 23 is shown as connected at 28 with the end contact 29 which is" insulated from the contact shell 20 as well understood in the art.

The stem 24 which may be of glass insulates then fused into t e base end of the bulb 10 at 32 whereupon the bulb 10 is evacuated and the evacuation opening, as for example through the stem 24, is closed and sealed.

The filament shown in Figures 1 and 2 is coiled in a plurality of convolutions to form a conical helix with its axis substantially parallel to the direction of application of rays from the lamp. The filament is preferably of 76 a material of relatively high infra-red ray efliciency and of relatively low visible light ray efliciency. A stereopticon filament of carbon silicate is suitable for this purpose, the size of filamentwire in an illustratedembodiment of the invention drawing two hundred watts,.which may vary. The open or larger end 34 of the conical filament helix shown is preferabl directed toward the point of application of t e rays from the lamp and 3 thesmaller or reduced end 35 of the conical filament is disposed away from the point of application of the rays.

The opposite ends 36 and 37 of the filament are suitably extended and connected at 25' with the lead-in wires 22 and 23 respectively. With the conical filament formation of this embodiment of the invention and the arrangement of this conical filament formation with the larger open end directed toward the point of application, I find. that at least a increase over the presenttype filament arrangement is obtained. The reflected energy;- that is, the ener' ment element itse f which amounts to about reflected Within the fila- 50% of the energy generated is directed upon the point of application from the open end of the-filament. The formation of the filament rovides a maximum invisible radiant ray 'dlschar'ged in one direction and the arrangement of this filament within the bulb directs this maximum discharge directly toward the point of application. The lateral discharge is less and the internal lateralreflection isdirected from the larger open end toward the point of application. The external lateral discharge may be utilized by means of any suitable or preferred reflector arrangement, not shown.-

Sealed with the filament 26 and stem 24 within the bulb 10 is a reflector 40. This reflector 4O ispreferably ofmetal and is secured and supported upon the stem 24 preferably on the axis of the filament 26, as shown. The reflector shown is of circular concave formation toward the filament 26 and is .provided with a central opening 42 through which the stem 24 passes, the reflector being suitably secured upon the stem 24 marginally around this opening 42.

This reflector arrangement within the bulb and on the axis of the helix reflects the rays from the smaller end of the conical filament out toward the point of application and still further with this arrangement, the rays from the smaller end of the filament are reflected out in the direction of emission of the in-- creased ray discharge from the larger end of the filament. The arrangement of the helical filament with its axis substantially parallel to the direction of application of the rays greatly increases the efliciency of the lamp and then by reflecting the rays from the opposite end of the helical filament by a reflector on the axis of the filament, this increased efficiency is still further increased. This elfects a material saving of current and obtains maximum output of the radiated energy and particularly in the infra-red or other equivalent invisible radiant energy.

In the embodiment shown in Figures 8 and I 4, the filament is coiled in a plurality of convolutions to form a substantially cylindrical helix with the turns 52 at the inner end and away from the point of application reduced to reduce the end of the helical filament away from the point of application of the rays from thefilament. Otherwise the larger open end of the filament is directed toward the point of application as before and the axis of the filament is preferably substantially parallel to the direction of application of the rays from the lamp and directedtoward the point of application and the reflector 53 is mounted upon the stem 54 and on the axis ofthe filament away from the point of application of the rays.

The larger open end of the filament is indicated at 58 and the lead-in wires 55 are shown as connected with the ends of the filament at 56.

In the embodiment of Figures 5 and 6, the filament is coiled in a plurality of convolutions to form a substantially cylindrical helix with both ends open and without the reduced .end of the previous embodiment.

ably enclosed and sealed within the bulb of the lamp.

I do not intend to be limited to the precise details shown or described. It is to be understood that the filament occurs singly, as

shown, or in groups of any desired number within a common enclosure. Where two or more filaments or filament and reflector combinations are employed all of the filaments will preferably be arranged in the manner described in connection with the single filament herein and the filaments may be connected in the electricl circuit within the vacuum inside the bulb either in series or parallel relation.

I claim:

As an article of manufacture a thereapeutic lamp comprising a bulb and a filament formed directly of carbon silicate, said filament being disposed within said bulb and coiled in a plurality of convolutions to form a conical helix with its axis substantially parallel to the direction of application of rays from said lamp and directed toward the point of application, the larger end of said helix being toward the point of application of the rays from the lamp and the smaller end of the helix being away from the point of application, an insulating base sealed to said bulb substantially in axial alignment with the axis of said filament, a contact shell on said base, a frangible lead-in stem secured to said base and projecting into said bulb, a refiector disposed within the bulb and mounted on said stem on the axis of said helix, and lead-in wires entering through said base and said stem and connected with said filament.

In witness whereof, I hereunto subscribe my name this 20th da of March, 1929.

EORGE D. RICE.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2454765 *Sep 28, 1944Nov 30, 1948Tung Sol Lamp Works IncElectric head lamp projector and incandescent lamp therefor
US3275874 *May 11, 1962Sep 27, 1966Jennings Radio Mfg CorpElectrically energized heat radiator
US3394259 *Feb 2, 1966Jul 23, 1968Navy UsaHollow conically shaped infrared reference source formed from bare and insulated helically wound wires
US4275327 *Oct 30, 1978Jun 23, 1981Duro-Test CorporationIncandescent electric lamp withheat recovery means
US4724329 *Oct 6, 1983Feb 9, 1988Laser Precision CorporationHigh efficiency radiation source for infrared spectrometry
US5163426 *Jun 26, 1987Nov 17, 1992Brigham And Women's HospitalAssessment and modification of a subject's endogenous circadian cycle
US5167228 *May 9, 1990Dec 1, 1992Brigham And Women's HospitalAssessment and modification of endogenous circadian phase and amplitude
US5176133 *Jun 15, 1989Jan 5, 1993Brigham And Women's HospitalAssessment and modification of circadian phase and amplitude
US5304212 *Jan 10, 1992Apr 19, 1994Brigham And Women's HospitalAssessment and modification of a human subject's circadian cycle
US5508587 *Nov 13, 1992Apr 16, 1996Williams; Ronald R.Incandescent lamp use with an optical fiber
US5545192 *Nov 28, 1994Aug 13, 1996Brigham And Women's HospitalIntermittent use of bright light to modify the circadian phase
US7517101Mar 27, 2007Apr 14, 2009Tobin Stephen MConvertible lamp array
EP1667202A1 *Jul 25, 2005Jun 7, 2006Patent-Treuhand-Gesellschaft für elektrische Glühlampen mbHIncandescent lamp for vehicle headlamp
Classifications
U.S. Classification607/88, 313/315, 338/234, 338/11, 313/111, 250/504.00R, 313/110, 313/271, 313/344
International ClassificationH01K1/00, H01K1/14
Cooperative ClassificationH01K1/14
European ClassificationH01K1/14