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Publication numberUS1861532 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 7, 1932
Filing dateJan 14, 1932
Priority dateJan 14, 1932
Publication numberUS 1861532 A, US 1861532A, US-A-1861532, US1861532 A, US1861532A
InventorsWilliam S Hough
Original AssigneeWilliam S Hough
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Elevation post
US 1861532 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

June 7, 1932. HdUGH 1,861,532

ELEVATION POST Filed Jan. 14, 1932 iNVENTOR AT RNEY Patented June 7, 1932 UNITED STATES PATENT FFICE WILLIAM S. HOUGH, OF KOKOMO, INDIANA ELEVATION 908']? Application filed January 14, 1932. Serial No. 586,686.

This invention relates to elevation posts of justably and resiliently mounted, the lower the kind especially adapted for use in connecportion of the body member is provided with tion with luminous tube signs and among a helical groove 16 into which is screwother objects, aims to provide an improved threaded the upper convolutions of an enpost which is resiliently mounted and readpansile coiled spring 17, whose inner diani- 55 11y adjustable. eter is substantially the same as the diameter In the accompanying drawing, showing a of the body member at the bottom of the preferred embodiment of the invention, grooves. The upper end of the groove ter- Fig. l is a side elevation, partly in section, minates at a radial recess 18 and the spring of the elevation post with a portion of a luinihas its upper end bent inwardly to provide 60 nous tube sign; a projection 19 which engages in the recess Fig. 2 is an elevation taken at right angles. to prevent relative rotation of the body memto Fig. 1, showing the tube in section; her and the spring. The spring 17, which is Fig. 3 is a sectional view taken on the line relatively long and has its convolutions rela- 33 of Fig. 1; and tively close together, is adapted to be screw- 65 Fig. 4 is an elevation of the insulating body threaded on the upper end of a smaller enmember. pansile coil spring 20, having similarly Luminous signs, such as the well known wound convolutions. Both springs are prefneon tube signs, are composed of a length of erably of brass or other non-rusting material.

20 glass tubing bent to the desired configuration The spring 20 is of such size that its convolu- 70 and having electrodes at each end, the tubes tions fit snugly into the groove or threads containing various rarefied gases which glow formed by the convolutions on the inside of when an electric current of high voltage is the larger spring, forming in effect a screwpassed therethrough. Due to the high voltage threaded connection, which, however, is of 6 employed, the tubes are held spaced from the the desired resiliency. 75 face of the sign by insulator or elevation In order to secure the postto the sign face, posts, the tubes being secured to the posts by the bottom convolution of the spring 20 is exsmall wires. As the distance between the tended to provide a lateral arm 21 which lies tube and the face of the sign varies, it is necesflat against the sign and has its outer end sary that the posts be adjustable. Also, the bent to form an eye 22, which is secured to 29 tube should be resiliently supported to prethe sign face by a screw or bolt 23. The vent the tube from breaking, due to shocks convolutions of each spring, being slightly and strains. spaced, give them the desired resiliency, per- Referring particularly to the drawing, mitting compression longitudinally, and at the preferred embodiment of the invention is the same time permit relative rotation of the 85 there shown as comprising a body member springs. By turning the body member in or post 10 supporting a tube 11 and adjusteither direction, it may be adjusted upwardly ably mounted, by means to be later described, or downwardly on the spring 20 and conse- 7 on the face of a sign 12. The body member, quently relative to the sign face.

which is preferably made of porcelain or It is to be noted that the upper end of the 90 glass, is shown as being cylindrical and pro spring 17 extends only partially up on the vided at its outer or upper end with a head body member so that sufficient space is proor saddle 18 having a V-sha )ed notch Lt to vided between the spring 17 and the wires 16 provide a seatfor neon tu es of different to provide the proper insulation.

sizes. The tube 11 is secured to the saddle From the foregoing description, it will be 95 by means of a wire 15 passing around the seen that an improved post has been provided tube and under the saddle and having its ends which will resiliently support a neon tube and twisted together around the upper endof the which is readily adjustable. It also probody member. vides sufficient insulation between the tube In order that the body member may be adand the sign face and due to its simple con- L0 struction may I Obviously, the present invention is not restricted to the particular embodiment thereof herein shown and described.

\Vhat I claim is 1. A unitary elevation post for Neon tubes comprising, in combination, an insulating post; a coil spring secured to said post and having a portion thereof projecting beyond one end of the post; and another coil spring whose convolutions are resiliently gripped by the convolutions of the first coil spring, so that when turned it is advanced or retracted, as by a screw-threaded connection.

2. An elevation post for luminous tubes comprising, in combination, a cylindrical body member of insulating material having a tube supporting saddle at the upper end thereof; an expansile coiled spring extending downwardly from the body member and having its upper end secured to the lower end of the body member; a second expansile coiled spring having its outside diameter slightly larger than the inside diameter of the first spring; the upper end of said second spring being threaded into the lower end of the first spring; and means on the lower end of the second spring to secure it to a sign face.

3. An elevation post for luminous tubes comprisin in combination, a cylindrical body mem r of insulating material having a tube supporting saddle at the upper end thereof; an expansile coiled spring extending downwardly from the body member and having its upper end secured to the lower end of the body member; and means secured to a sign face and threaded into the lower portion of said spring to permit adjustment of the body member.

4. An elevation post for luminous tubes comprising, in combination, a cylindrical body member of insulating material having a tube supporting saddle at the upper end thereof; an expansile coiled spring extending downwardly from the body member and having its upper end secured to the lower end of the body member; the convolutions of said spring being relatlvely close together; a smaller spring having similar convolutions and secured at its lower end to the face of a sign; the upper convolutions of said smaller spring being frictionally engaged in the grooves formed by the convolutions on the inside of the other spring, whereby the overall length of the post may be varied by rela tive rotation of the springs.

5. An elevation post for luminous tubes comprising, in combination, a cylindrical body member of insulating material having a tube supporting saddle at the upper end thereof; said body member having a helical groove formed therein at the lower end; said groove terminating at its upper end in a radial recess; an expansile coiled spring havture.

WILLIAM S. HOUGH.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2429029 *Sep 11, 1945Oct 14, 1947Newbern Perry AElectric fence bracket
US2545416 *Jul 7, 1948Mar 13, 1951Herbert B GroetzingerSupport for luminous tubing
US2675570 *Jul 2, 1949Apr 20, 1954Jack SacksExtensible rotary pipe or conduit cleaning portable device
US2744705 *Oct 1, 1952May 8, 1956Everbrite Electric SignsResilient supports for light tubes
US2808503 *Jun 18, 1956Oct 1, 1957Sanford W BallShock absorbing support for lamp shades
US2808609 *May 18, 1955Oct 8, 1957Schultz Warren HAdjustable door stop
US2829908 *Mar 8, 1956Apr 8, 1958Mine Safety Appliances CoRock dust collecting apparatus
US2835465 *Dec 1, 1953May 20, 1958Patterson Roger WResistor mounting brackets
US2850560 *Nov 1, 1954Sep 2, 1958Neon Engineering IncNeon tube supports
US2940777 *Jul 16, 1956Jun 14, 1960Lundberg Theodore BIrrigation hose
US3084318 *May 4, 1960Apr 2, 1963Carl M LindGarage door openers
US3128962 *Jul 23, 1962Apr 14, 1964 figures
US3135236 *Mar 27, 1961Jun 2, 1964Pacific Plywood CoAerial warning marker
US3193064 *Jun 1, 1962Jul 6, 1965Sylvania Electric ProdRetaining and securing devices for high temperature applications
US3303263 *Jul 9, 1965Feb 7, 1967Aluminum Co Of AmericaBundle spacer devices
US3878810 *Dec 19, 1973Apr 22, 1975Conrad Gerald LVehicle mounted safety warning device and bracket therefor
US4205888 *May 12, 1978Jun 3, 1980Wade Jack WGround connector for interlocked armor electrical cable
US4953801 *Oct 25, 1988Sep 4, 1990Yazaki CorporationClip
US5101213 *Nov 22, 1989Mar 31, 1992Harada Kogyo Kabushiki KaishaScrew type coupling device and an antenna installation device using the same
US20100143069 *Jan 18, 2007Jun 10, 2010Simon Garry MooreFriction mechanism
EP0370715A2 *Nov 20, 1989May 30, 1990Harada Industry Co., Ltd.An antenna installation device using a screw type coupling device
Classifications
U.S. Classification174/138.00H, 411/401, 285/61, 267/177, 411/438, 248/50, 403/229, 411/392
International ClassificationG09F13/26
Cooperative ClassificationG09F13/26
European ClassificationG09F13/26