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Publication numberUS1863534 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 14, 1932
Filing dateAug 23, 1930
Priority dateAug 23, 1930
Publication numberUS 1863534 A, US 1863534A, US-A-1863534, US1863534 A, US1863534A
InventorsOdell Carl L
Original AssigneeOdell Carl L
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Vacuum cup
US 1863534 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

June 14, 1932 E. H. oDELl. 1,863,534

VACUUM CUP FiredAug. 23, 195o Patented June 14, 1932 UNITED STATES PATENT? QFFI EARL E. ODELL, F CHICAGG, ILLINOIS; GAL L. ODELL EXECUTOR OF SAID ODELL, DECEASED Y EARL H.

VACUUM GUI? Application led August 23,

This invention relates to vacuum cup for use in connection With violet and oth-er ray treatments of the human body to subject a localized portion of the body to the action of the rays, yWhile at the same time putting that portion of the body under reduced air pressure.

It is an object of my invention to provide a vacuum cup that may be applied to a localized portion of the human body to draw blood to the surface of such localized portion so that it may be more effectively treated with rays passing through the cupto the body.

It is also an object of my invention to pro- Y vide a vacuum cup which will coniine the rays passing therethrough so that only that portion of the body enclosed by the cup is subjected to the action of the rays.

` It is a further object of my invention to provide a vacuum cup adapted for connection to air-exhausting machines but with simple means whereby the air-pressure in the cup may be readily controlled Without necessitating control means for the air-exhausting machines.

Itis an important obgl ect of my invention to provide a vacuum cup having means whereby parts of the human body may be massaged by being subjected to a pulsating sub-atmosv kpheric pressure to stimulate the iiow of blood to the surface of the body.

It is a further object of my invention to provide a vacuum cup of simple and ineXpen- Y sive construction so that the cost of large U cups for treating large areas of the human body will not be prohibitive.

Other and further important objects of this invention will become apparent from the disclosures in the following description andv claims.

In the accompanying drawing which illustrates a preferred embodiment of this invention and in which similar reference numerals refer to similar features in the Y different Figure 1 is a top plan view of a cup embodying the principles of my invention.

.F igure 2 is aside view in elevation.

Figure 3 is a sectional view of the same taken along the line III-III of Figure 1. -Y

1930. Serial No. 477,317.

Figure 4 is a sectional view of my cup showing a modified form of gasket.

Figure 5 is a top plan view of my cup showing an alternative shape of my cup. v

Figure 6 is a sectional view of a modified"`55 form of nipple for connecting my cup to airaspirating systems.

In the drawing the'numeral 10 indicates generally a vacuum cup of a shape to enclose an area of the human body to lbe treated byV` B0 ultra-violet or other light rays. rlhe'cup 10 Vinclu-des a casing 11 of a material substantially opaque to ultra-violet rays or other light rays, and the casing has a portion of increased bore 12 so that an internal shoulder 13 is formed therein tol support a glass 'disc 14- to close one end of the casing. The disc 14C is sealed in position byk a layer of cement 15 applied about its edge, or by any other suitable sealing means. Y Y

The casing 11 is apertured in its walland a nipple 16, for connection to an airexhau'sting machinel through a hose 17, is threaded in the aperture.

In order that the air-pressure, below atmospheric pressure, may be readily controlled by the operator Without necessitating the manipulation of control valve means in the air-exhausting hose linesor the manipulation of control means affecting the running of the airexhausting machinery I have provided an aperture 18 in the wall of t-he casing which is adapted to be covered by the finger ofthe operator.

It is obvious that by more or less completely covering the aperture by his linger the opera-tor may nicely regulate the rate at which air-pressure is reduced when the cup is connected to an air-exhausting system and is in contact with the body of a patient.

An important advantage of my means for controlling the air-pressure in the cup resides in the facility with which the air pressure may be reduced so that the cup may be brought out of contact with the body of a Y patient.

'breast-pump for insta-nce, is used, and the skin within the treated area of the body is drawn into the cup to tightly seal one end of it, the manipulation of the cup or of adj acent skin so as to admit air into the cup to permit its being removed not infrequently causes pain. When the means I have disclosed are employed it is a simple matter to uncover the aperture 18 so that air is admitted to the cup to release it, and also to control the rate of air admission so that the treated parts may return to their normal Condition gradually and without causing the patient any. pain.v

In order to stimulate the ilow of blood toV the surface I find it highly advantageous to intermittently cover and uncover the aperf ture 18 so that a pulsating subatmospheric pressure is obtained on the parts treated to gently massage these parts.

A conventional form ot valve 24 may be inserted in the aperture 18, as shown in Figure 4, to be manipulated by the fingers of theoperator, or to be so balanced as to intermittently admit fair to the cupto massage the treated parts.

It willbe understood that when no more is'sought than the massaging of parts ot the body,.any.suitable form of vacuum cup may be used which is apertured to provide inlet means to be intermittently covered and opened by the operator, or with a suitable valve arranged to do so automatically. I prefer the arrangement shown in Figure 1 because it is a simple matter to control the pressure inthe cupA by the finger of the operator when the cup isheld in his hand.

The casing 11 may be slightlyA recessed 'about the aperture 18 to Jform a seat f or the tipof theA operators finger. The casing 1s, in effect, a valve seat when the operators ingeris the valve.

In Figure 6 I have shown a nipple 25 which may be of such a length and shape as to form a handle for the cup, and which has the usual air conduit 26, and-an additionalconduitQT forcommunicating with the interior of the cupV and which opens to the atmosphere at the inlet`28. With a nipple of this form the inlet 28 may be covered by the thumb of the operator as he holds the handle in his'hand. The inlet 18-may be then suitably plugged; or it may be iitted with a valve to intermittently admit air sothat the advantages of both automatic and manual control maybe obtained.

In order that a resilient and air-tight joint may be made between the cup and the body of a patient the lower edge of the casing .11 is provided with a rubber gasket.

In Figure 3 I have shown a rubber gasket 19 having a reduced upperportion 20 so that an interiorshoulder 21 isk ormedto abutthe lower edge of the casing 11. The gasket 19 is held inposition by means of a band 220; encircling it and compelling it Ato intimate contact with the wall of the casing. j The gasket 19, and the band 22a may be secured tothe casing by threaded screws 20, or by other suitable means.

In Figure 4 I have shown a modified form of gasket. This gasket 21 consists of a rubber strap having a bifurcated portion so that apair of members 22 engage opposite sides of the wall of the casing 11 at its lower end. The members 22 may be secured to the wall ofthe casing 11 by bolts 23, or by any other suitable means.

Fig-ure 5 shows an alternative shape of my cup for covering relatively large areas of the 'body of a patient; and it will be evident that the structure I have shown and described may be embodied in cups having casings shaped to-cover irregularly shaped part's'and areas of the human body without departing from the spirit of my invention. While I have described the disc or closing member 14 as being of glass it will be understood that Il do not purpose limiting myself to the use of any particular kind of glass, and that I contemplate the use of other materials which are Vsubstantially transparent to the rays used in treat-ing the partsy of the humanbody, and

which will preferably be of such a nature to permit the physician to inspect the enclosed casing to seal that end against the ingress-of" air, and an apertured member on the casing and-in'communication with the interior thereoffor connection to an air-aspirating device.

2.-A vacuumcup for use in treating the human body with light rays, comprising an open-ended casing of a material opaque to light rays, a member transparent to light positioned on one end of said casing to seal that end against ingress of air, conduit means on the casing for connection with an air-aspirating system, and means including a wall of said casing manually controllable to control admission of air into the casing while the cup is in use in contact with the human body.

3. A vacuum cup for use in treatingk the humanrbody with light rays,V comprising a dished member having a part thereof transparent to light rays, conduit means on the member for connection with an air-aspirator, and a gasket secured to the rim of said member',said gasket having opposed members secured von opposite surfaces of the wall of said dished member and an integral depending resilient member for contact with the human body to provide an air-tight joint between the body andthe dished member.

4. A vacuum cup for use inl treating the human'body with light rays, comprising an open-ended casing of a material opaque to light rays, a member transparent to lightlpositioned on one end of said casing to seal that end against ingress of air, a resilient gasket member secured on the other end of the casing adapted to form a seal when the casing is applied to a human body, and conduit means on the casing for communication with an airaspirgting system.

In testimony whereof I have hereunto subscribed by name at Chicago, Cook County,

Illinois.

EARL H. ODELL.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2681467 *Dec 4, 1948Jun 22, 1954Reynolds GuyerVacuum cleaner with floor sterilizing means
US3207150 *Mar 12, 1962Sep 21, 1965Goran UddenbergInstruments for injection of contrast fluids for x-ray examination of fistulas
US3862627 *Aug 16, 1973Jan 28, 1975Hans Sr Wendel JSuction electrode
US7128735Dec 30, 2004Oct 31, 2006Richard Scott WestonReduced pressure wound treatment appliance
US7708724Apr 4, 2005May 4, 2010Blue Sky Medical Group IncorporatedReduced pressure wound cupping treatment system
US7776028Mar 31, 2005Aug 17, 2010Bluesky Medical Group IncorporatedAdjustable overlay reduced pressure wound treatment system
US7846141Aug 28, 2003Dec 7, 2010Bluesky Medical Group IncorporatedReduced pressure treatment system
US7909805Apr 4, 2005Mar 22, 2011Bluesky Medical Group IncorporatedFlexible reduced pressure treatment appliance
US7998125May 19, 2005Aug 16, 2011Bluesky Medical Group IncorporatedHypobaric chamber treatment system
US8062272Feb 24, 2005Nov 22, 2011Bluesky Medical Group IncorporatedFlexible reduced pressure treatment appliance
US8062273Dec 6, 2010Nov 22, 2011Bluesky Medical Group IncorporatedReduced pressure treatment system
US8100887Mar 8, 2005Jan 24, 2012Bluesky Medical Group IncorporatedEnclosure-based reduced pressure treatment system
US8398614Apr 1, 2009Mar 19, 2013Smith & Nephew PlcApparatus for aspirating, irrigating and cleansing wounds
US8449509Jul 7, 2010May 28, 2013Bluesky Medical Group IncorporatedFlexible reduced pressure treatment appliance
US8540699Aug 13, 2010Sep 24, 2013Bluesky Medical Group IncorporatedReduced pressure wound treatment system
US8545464Apr 23, 2012Oct 1, 2013Bluesky Medical Group IncorporatedReduced pressure treatment system
US8569566Nov 22, 2011Oct 29, 2013Smith & Nephew, PlcWound cleansing apparatus in-situ
US8628505Nov 22, 2011Jan 14, 2014Bluesky Medical Group IncorporatedReduced pressure treatment system
US8708998Apr 7, 2009Apr 29, 2014Bluesky Medical Group, Inc.Enclosure-based reduced pressure treatment system
US8821419 *May 27, 2011Sep 2, 2014Allen L. Van BeekFlexible interface external micro vacuum chamber tissue expander
US8834451Jan 31, 2012Sep 16, 2014Smith & Nephew PlcIn-situ wound cleansing apparatus
WO1998052511A1 *May 18, 1998Nov 26, 1998Manushakian Hagop SamuelNipple eversion device
Classifications
U.S. Classification601/11, 15/257.1, 607/90, 4/524
International ClassificationA61M1/08
Cooperative ClassificationA61M2205/053, A61M1/08
European ClassificationA61M1/08