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Publication numberUS1863549 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 14, 1932
Filing dateMar 2, 1927
Priority dateMar 2, 1927
Publication numberUS 1863549 A, US 1863549A, US-A-1863549, US1863549 A, US1863549A
InventorsLockwood Ernest H
Original AssigneeLockwood Ernest H
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Method of and apparatus for casting in position architraves and the like upon faced concrete walls
US 1863549 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

L WM HTER YAvni ERIE..

AL DL 1,863,549 Us FOR CASTING IN POSITION ARcHITRAvEs s 5 sheets-sheet 1 ATTORNZK June 14, 1 H LQCKWOOD 1,863,549

METHOD ffNDAPPARMUSMFQRU@SUNG1;: POSITION ARCHITRAVES AND THE 111,1202: UP'joN FQED bgCRETE WALLS Y K mmf" 0mg/JTW..

ATTORNEX Wfl 5 z E. H. LOCKWOD AND THE LIKE UlON FMEA) CONCRETE wALLs Fill Mmh 2. 1927 METHOD OF AND APPARATUS FOR CASTING XN POSITION ARCHITRAVES `lune 14, 1932.

June 14, 1932. E. H. LocKwooD 1,853,549

METHOD OF AND APPARATUS FOR CASTING IN POSITION ARCHITRVES AND THE LIKE UPON FACED CONCRETE WALLS Filed March 2, 1927 5 Sheets-Sheet 4 ATTORNEK June 14, 1932. E. H. LocKwooD METHOD 0F AND APPARATUS FOR CASTING IN POSITION ARCHITRAVES AND THE LIKE UPON FACED CONCRETE WALLS 5 Sheets-Sheet 5 Filed March 2. 1927 ATTORNLX Patented June 14, 1932 narran STATES PATENT OFFICE ERNEST Il'. LOCKWOOD, 0F PASAENA, CALIFORNIA METHOD 0F AND APPARATUS FOR CASTING IN POSITION ARCHITIRAVES AND THE LIKE UPON FACED CONCRETE VTAI'IJS Application led March 2, 1927. Serial No. 171,997.

My invention relates to the art of embellishing slab faced walls, particularly of the general type disclosed in my copending application for U. S. Letters Patent, Serial No. 171,998, filed March 2, 1927, wherein wooden forms are eliminated by pouring concrete directly between oppositely disposed wall facing members, comprising precast concrete slabs interloclred edge to edge and held in spaced relation by transverse ties and permanently incorporated with said poured concrete into a slab faced wall.

A broad object of my invention is to hide exposed edges of said facing slabs by casting therearound, integral with concrete poured between said facing slabs, a harmonious, architectural member of plastic molding composition,y such as architraves for wall openings, pilasters for wall ends, and the like.

Another object is to provide molds for said purpose which may be readily attached to said facing slabs by bolts through the cracks therebetween so that said molds may be filled with plastic molding composition integral with the pouring of said walls, Combining thereby a decorative feature with strength and stability, said molds being easily removed without injury to said facings.

nother object is to provide a form for certain of said purposes which is inherently adjustable to meet diderent thicknesses of said walls.

Another object is to provide a form, of the character described, which provides for the holding in position of the opening frame, when desired, whether of steel. wood or other composition. pending the molding opera' tion, and which may be readily disassembled thereafter..

Other obj eets and advantages beyond those above set forth will be made manifest hereinafter. Y

In the drawings:

Fig. 1 is a perspective View of the preferred form of the casing mold of my invention completely7 assembled and secured in place in a wall opening prior .to the casting of the casing.

Fig. 2 is a fragmentary perspective view showing a sill of the monolithic casing of my invention after the casing has been cast integrally with a wall.

Fig. 3 is a outside elevational view of a completed casing.

Fig. 4 is a vertical sectional view taken onv the line 4 4 of Fig.` 3.

Fig. 5 is a horizontal sectional view taken on the line 5 5 of Fig. 1. n

Fig. 6 is a vertical sectional view illustrating the portion of the casing mold in which the casing sill is cast, this portion of the mold not being completely assembled.

Fig. 7 is a perspective view of a clamp member by which the mold of my invention is secured to opposite wall facing members of a composite wall in which it is desired to form a casing.

Fig. 8 is a perspective view illustrating the manner of erection of a composite wall with which the apparatus 0f my invention is particularly adapted to be used.

Fig. 9 is a fragmentary elevationall view illustrating a Adetail of the wall of Fig. 8.

Fig. 1() is a fragmentary horizontal' view taken on the line 10-10 of Fig. 9. i

Fig. 11 is a fragmentary view illustrating a key member employed in the construction of the wall shown in Fig. 8.

Fig. 12 is a perspective view showing'the elements of one-half of the preferred form of my window casing mold drawn apart in vdisassembled relation so as lto clearly illustrate the details of the parts shown.A

Fig. 13 is a horizontal sectionalview taken through the jamb portion of a modified form of casing mold.

Fig. 14 is a sectional view through the sill Vportion of the mold of Fig. 13 and is taken on the line 14-14 thereof. v Fig. 15 is'a fragmentary perspective view illustrating a metallic Z-bar window-hanging frame upon which the casing mold is assembled.

Fig. 16 is a fragmentaryv perspective View showing a window-hanging frame constructed ofwood and stamped sheet metal. A

F ig. 17 is a vertical sectional; view illus? trating the manner by which a novel cornice is constructed.

Referring to the drawings by numerals, a complete window casing mold 10 is shown as assembled in a wall opening 11, formed in a composite wall 12.

The structure of the composite wall 12 is best illustrated in Fig. 8 and has facings 13 and 14 which are built up, as shown, from slabs 15. Each slab 15 has tongues 16 provided upon the upper and lower longitudinal edges 18 thereof near the ends of the slab. Apertures 19 are formed in the central portions of the slab edges 18 so that when the slabs 15 are erected edge to edge in breakjointrelation to form the facings 13 and 14, as shown in Fig. 8, the tongues 16 of each adjacent pair of slabs in a given horizontal course will project upwardly and downwardly into apertures 19 of the central portions of slabs of the Courses immediately above and below. j Inasmuch as each slab 15 is thus joined at siX separate points with slabs thereabove and therebelow, al1 of the slabs 15 used in the erection of the facings 13 and 14 assume a true alignment with eachother in which the inter-facial planes of eachslab, upon which both the tongues 16 and the apertures 19 are formed, substantially coincide.

The facings 13 and 14 are held together by tie members 25. Each of the tie members 25 has a connecting element 26 and a pair of end plates 27 which are adapted to be secured to the opposite ends thereof. Each connecting element 26 is preferably made of wire and has a central portion 28 which terminates in arcuate bends 29 which return to form short portions 30 which are aligned with the centralportion 28 and which are bent vertically downward at their outer ends to form necks V31, from the lower ends of which the ends 32 of the element 26 are bent in opposite directions perpendicularly relative tothe central portion 28 of the element 26.

Each end plate 27 has a central body portion 35 which is provided with corrugations 36, and which has pairs of-ears 37 eX- tending outward therefrom in opposite directions to form slots 38, as clearly shown in Fig. 10. The body 35 of each end plate 27 extends inward to form a tongue 40 which has a hole 41 which is adapted to receive the ends 32 of the connecting element 26.

Inv the erection of the wall 12, tie members 25 are laid acrossthe wall as each pair of opposite courses of slabs in the facings 13 and 14 is completely set up. The tie members 25 'are thus laid so that the end plates 27 rest in a position clearly shown in Fig. 8, one of the end plates27' of each tie member 25 receiving, through the slots 38, the upward projecting tongues 16 from adjoining slabs 15 in one of the facings 13 or 14. The other end plate 27 rests upon a slab of the opposite facing and lies over an aperture 19 so that the slots 38 are disposed directly over this aperture. With the erection of the next,

higher courses of slabs 0f the facings 13 and 14, apertures 19 of these next courses will fit down over the tongues 16 which project upwardly through the slots 38 and thus hold certain end plates 27 disposed about these tongues and securely positioned between vertically adjacent courses of slabs. Likewise, the tongues 16 projecting downward from the next course ofslabs will pass through slots 38 disposed about apertures 19, as clearly shown in Fig. 9. The tongues 16 are connected to each other through the interior of the slab 15 by reinforcing wires 45 from ,which the tongues 16 are formed by bending.

The tie members 25 are alternately Vreversed in position so that the recesses 46 formed by the arcuate bends 29 in the connecting elements 26 of each vertical series of tie members 25, will form guideways which securely retain in place vertical reinforcing rods 47 when these are interwoven between theV tie members 25 at the points of the formation of the arcuate bends 29.

At the commencing of the erection of the wall 12, the facings 13 and 14 are built up to a height'of four or five slabs,as shown, and held vertically plumb by a limited amount of scaffolding, shown diagrammatically at 47a in Fig. 8. Airspace forms 48 are then placed downwardly in the space 49 formed between the facings 13 and 14 so that one of the forms 48k is disposed between each adjacent pair of vertical series of tie members 25 in thesame manner as the single form 48 is shown between onepair of these series in Fig. 8. The other forms 48 used in the construction of the wall 12 were left out of Fig. 8 in order that certain details of this View might not be covered up. `When the forms 48 have all been properly positioned between the facings 13 and 14, plastic concrete is poured into the space 49 about the forms 48 to form a monolithic concrete core for the wall 12.

When the wall 12 is thus formed webs 52 may be permitted to form between adjacent `edges of the forms 48 which will connect the opposite facings 13 and 14 and transmit moisture, heat or cold therebetween. It is there-A fore planned to use strips 53 of insulating material 'having slits 54 formed therein so that the strips 53 can be fitted over the connecting elements 26 of each vertical series of tie members 25 and the strips 53 extend across the entire width of the webs 52 at the central portion thereof and completely insulate opposite facings 13 and 14 of the wall 12.

In order to strengthen the wall 12, keys 55 are disposed in suitable holes 56 formed inv the strips 53 so that opposite ends of thekcys 55 will be cast into opposite portions of the divided web 52 to give the wall 12 an essential unitj7 even though it is .practically divided in the middle by air spaces and strips of insulation 53. Further details of the com# positel wall 12 will be found in my co-pendin g application referred to above.

lVhen, in the course of the construction of the composite wall 12, it becomes desirable to form a casing for a wall opening therein, this will preferably be cast at the same time as the interior 49 of the wall itself in a manner which may be described as follows:

The opposite facings 13 and 14 are here shown built up to completely enclose the wall opening 11. V

The. mold 10, as shown in Fig. 1', about the opening 11 may be formed in several different ways but it is particularly desirable that it be assembled as a unit for convenience in handling, and it is also desirable that the mold be easily disassembled after the wall and casing have been cast so that no evidence of the mold is left upon the completed wall and casing. n a casing 65, such as shown in Figs. 2, 3 and 4, it is very desirable to have a window-hanging frame 66 extend entirely around the interior edge of the opening 67 of the casing. In the present invention a Windowhanging frame 66 of steel Z-bar construction is shown which it is the purpose of this invention to cast directly into the opening 67 of the casing when the wall 12 and the casing 65 are simultaneously poured.

Referring to Fig. 12 the above purposes are accomplished by the provision of a central telescopic mold member 70, andV inside and outside mold members 71 and 72 respectively. The right hand halves 73, 74 and 75 of the mold members 7 0, 71 and 72 respectively are shown in Fig. 12. Each of these halves consists of upper and lower elements. rlhe half 73 of the mold member 70 has an upper element 76 and a lower element 77. The element 76 has a head portion 7 7a and a jamb portion 78. rlhe element 77 has a jamb portion 79 and a sill portion 80.

The half-7 4 of the mold member 71 has upper and lower elements 81'and 82. The element 81 has a head portion 84 and a jamb portion 85. The lower element 82 has a jamb portion 86 and a sill portion 87. The half 75 of the mold member 72 has upper and lower elements 90 an-d 91 respectively. The element 90 has a head portion 92 and a jamb portion 93, while the element 91 has a j amb portion 94 and a sill portion 95. The two portions of each of the above-mentioned elements are connected together at right angles to each other. rl`he jamb portions of the upper and lower elements of each of the mold member halves 7 3` 74 and 75 are telescoped together, as clearly shown in Fig. 12. This telescoping is for the purpose of permitting a vertical eX- tension of the mold 10 to lit a Wall opening 11 varying in its vertical dimension.

In assembling the mold 10, the central mold member is telescopically extended so that the upper and lower elements ofthe half 73 thereof lit into the Lipper and lower right hand corners of the Window-hanging frame 66, here shown fragmentarily for the purpose of illustration. When the half 73 of the mold member 70 is thus positioned within one side y of the window-hanging frame 66, the upper and lower elements of each of the halves 74 and of the mold members 71 and 72 are telescoped together so as to correspond in vertical dimension with the half 73 of the mold member 70, and are then shifted inward so that an interior surface of each of the mold member halves 74 and 75 fit upon corresponding edge surfaces of the half 73 of the inner mold member 70. When one-half of the mold 10 is thus assembled, the opposite complementary halves of the mold members 7 0, 71 and 72 are assembled in an identical manner upon the window-hanging frame 66. When the opposite halves are thus assembled they will not only be telescoped so as to correspond in vertical dimension to the window-hanging frame 66, but their head portions and sill portions will telescopically meet and combine with the head and sill portions of the mold members 7 0, 71 and 72 to form complete head and sill-forming cavities which unite at their opposite ends with the tops and bottoms of jamb-forming cavities, the right hand one of which is formed by the mold members shown in Fig. 12. Thus, within certain limits the members 70, 71 and 72 of the mold 10 telescopically unite to form acomplete molding cavity 'for forming a casing about the window-hanging frame 66 so that the casing formed thereby will conform to the size of the window-hanging frame.

Means are provided for unitingv the members 70, 71 and 72 upon the lframe 66, when they are thus positioned, to` form the assembled mold 10. This means comprises a temporary bracing structure 100 which hasl side members 101, a top member 102, abottom member 103, and vertical spacers 104. The

side members 101. as clearly shown in Fig. 5,

are formed of planks 106 uponwhich wooden strips 107,108, 109, and 110 are nailed. rlhe strips 107 to 110 inclusive are of such shape and size that they fit into the inequalities of the jamb portions ofthe mold 10 so as to 'hold members 7 0, 71 and 72 -in the spaced relation in which they are shown in Fig. 5. The top member 102 of thebracing structure 100 also comprisesV a plank 106 which has blocks 107 to 110 inclusivevformed thereonV in identically the same manner as in the side members 101. The lower member 103 of the bracing structure 100 has azplank 113 which is provided with blocks 114, 115, 116. and 117 which lfit over contiguous edges of the sill-V in'such position that when it islowered directly downward upon this sill portion of the mold it will correctly secure the various ele,- ments of the mold rigi-dly together in the desired position.

As will be noted in this figure, flanges 120, formed upon the sill portions 95 of the mold elements 91, are designed to be received in a narrow slot 121 provided between the wooden strips 116 and 117 of the bracing vmember 103. Moreover, the channel-like bent portion 122 of the sill portions 80 of the mol-d elements 77 fit snugly over the lower bar of the windowhanging frame 66 so that when this channe-l portion 122 is received into an opening 125 provided between the strips 115 and 116, the mold element sill portions 80 will be held in spaced relation relative tothe sill portions 95 of the outer mold ,member 72.

An opening 126 between the strips 114 and 115 of the bracing member 103 also receives a short vertical flange 128 provided along the inner, upper edge of the sill portions 87 of the inner mold member 71 so as to hold the sill portion 87 in spaced relation to the sill portion 80 and thus, also, to the sill portion `95. The flanges 120 and 128 and the channel-shaped formation 122 are formed vupon all of the elements of the corresponding mold members 70, 71 and 72 so that these flanges extend'continuously around the inner edge of the opening within; the mold 10 and are also engaged, as shown clearly in Fig. 5, by the wooden blocks 107 and 110, inclusive, which are provided upon the side and upper bracing members V101 and 102.

Vhen the mold 10 1s assembled upon the window-hanging frame 66 for the formation of a easement in a wall opening 11, the character of the bracing members 101, 102 and 103 will depend upon the width of the wall 12, in which the opening 11 is formed, and upon the relative distance from the opposite faces of the wall 12 at which it is desired to dispose the window-hanging frame 66. When the strips 107 to 110 inclusive and 114 to 117 inclusive are varied in relative shape and size the bracing structure 100, when set up, will be effective to cause unification of the various elements of the mold 10 upon the frame 66 so as to alter the width of wall which the mold will fit as well as determine the distances from the opposite faces of such wall'at which the fra-me 66 will be positioned when the mold 10 is fitted thereto. y

When the bracing structure members 101, 102 and 103 have been placed, as shown in Fig. 1, the vertical spacers 104 are pried into place to retain the bracing structure members 102 and 103 in position7 between the bracing members 101, this causing the whole bracing structure 100 to be retained in eX- panded position.

A channel 130 is formed in the lower' edges of the sill portions 95 of a mold member 72,

and a channel 132 is formed across the lower edges of the sill portions 87 of the mold member 71. Channels 133 are formed on the outer edge of the jamb and head portions of the various elements of the mold members 71 and 72. When the mold 10 has been assembled upon the window-hanging frame 66, as just described, it is set upon the courses of slabs 61 and 62 at the position in which it is desired to form a casing 65, and higher courses of sla-bs 135'are built upon the the courses 61 and 62 so that the ends of these higher courses of slabs 135 terminate at the side edges of the opening 11, as shown at 136 in Figs. 2 and 5. When the mold 10 is thusset upon the courses of slabs 61 and 62 an angle iron 138 is placed in the channels 130 and clamps 140 applied thereto to rigidly hold the sill portions 95 of the mold 10 against the outer face of the outer facing member 13.

.The clamps 140, as clearly shown in Fig. 7, each comprises a clamp body 141 and a bolt 142, the bolt 142 being supplied with a. washer 143 and a nut 144. In applying the clamps 140, the bolts 142 are extended through a suitable hole in the'body 141 so that a long foot 145 of the body engages the adjacent edges of an adjacent pair of slabs 15, and so that a short foot 146 of the body 141 engages the angle iron 138, and so that the bolt 142 eX- tends between the slabs engaged by the foot 145 and receives the washer`143 and nut 144 upon the inside of the slabs. When the clamps 140 are thus applied to the angle iron 138 andthe bolts 142 tightened up, the foot 146 forces the angle iron 138 toward the outer face of the wall facing 13 to effect a clamping of the mold 10 thereto as above described. In a similar manner, an angle iron 150 is disposed in the channels 132 and clamps 140 applied thereto to clamp the sill portions 87 of the mold member 71 against the course of slabs 62.

As the upper courses of slabs 135 are erected the ends 136 of these courses project inward va slight' distance within the jamb portions of the mold 10 so that the channels 133 of these jamb portions abut against the outer faces of the wall facings 13 and 14 along the edge of the opening 11. Angle irons 153 are then disposed in the channels 133 and clamps 140 are applied, as clearly shown in Fig. 1, to rigidly clamp the amb portions of the mold to the outer faces of the facings 13 and 14. The course of slabs 155 which extends across the top of the opening 11 projects downward just within the channels 133 formed upon the head portions of the mold 10. An angle iron. 156V is then placed in the channels 133 of the head portions of the mold 10 and clamps 140 applied, as shown in Fig. 1, whereby the angle iron 156 rigidly secures the channels 133 of the head portions of the mold 10 to the upper courses ofk slabs 155.

The facings 13 and 14 may be erected entirely about the mold 10, as shown in Fig. 1, before the interior of the wall 12 is poured full of concrete above the point 60. This however, is not the usual method contemplated for it is desired to pour the silll portion of the mold l10 when but one or two courses of slabs 135 are erected upon the courses 6l and 62. The advantages of this are obvious inasmuch as the pouring of the sill at this time makes it possible to work'the plastic concrete in from the sides until the sill cavity 160 of the mold 10 is entirely filled with plastic concrete. The facings 13 and 14 may then be built up higher and the farms 48 may be drawn up and repositioned for continuing the vertical air spaces throughout the height of the wall as previouslyv described. In this manner the wall 12 which is disposed about the opening 1l and the mold 10 is poured full of plastic concrete in such a manner that a casing is formed about the opening 11 which is monolithic in texture with the interior of the Wall 12. This feature of my invention is most clearly shown in Figs. 2 and 4 in which the integral union of the wall and the casing is graphically shown.

When the casing 65 has sufliciently set, the structure 100 is dismantled by removing the spacer boards 104, and the clamps 14() are removedV by unscrewing the bolts 142 from the nuts 144 and washers 143 which remain inside the wall, and the various elements of the mold 10 may then be drawn separately from the casing cast therein, leaving the finished casing formed about the wall opening 11, as clearly shown in Fig. 3.

It is of great importance that the method of this invention enables the castingof a window-hanging frame 66 in the concrete of a monolithic casing so that there is no pos. sibilit of water entering the house between the window-hanging frame 66 and the con-1 crete of the casing.

In constructing those portions of the ele-Y ments of each mold member which telescope together in pairs, it is preferred to bend each .of these pairs from two thin sheets of metal, temporarily soldered or otherwise secured together face to face and passed through a form-- ing die or break as a single sheet of metal.

After thus being bent in the proper shape together, each pair of telescoping mold-element portions is released from the other and slid apart, and they are then mitered and joined with the other portions of their corresponding mold member elements. Each of these pairs of element portions,` isthen brought together in the assembling of the mold 10 in the same relation as they had when they were formed. Thus a perfect telescopic union is made between these various telescoping pairs of mold-element portions, and the slight break in the surface of the casing,

formed in the mold 10, due to the joints be-v tween telescoping elements. of the mold, is reducedl to an. absolute minimum.

` If it is desired, any slight irregularities, such as those above noted, may be smoothed overafter the mold 10 is removed, by the application of a slight amount of plastic concrete. of finishing grade with smearing templates which are provided with the same conformation as the inner and outer faces of the head, jamb and sill' portions of the casing.

The use of the airspace forms 48 is not illustrated in Fig. 1 as this was thought unnecessary, but in the fragmentary view of Fig. 2 showing the portion .of a completed wall with which the easement 65 of my invention has been integrally cast, vertical Vair spaces 162 are shown which have been formed in .the interior concrete 163 of the wall 12 by the air space forms 48.

In Figs. 13, 14 and 16 I show a modied form of window-hanging frame 170 which comprises a rectangularly-shaped woodenV frame 171, upon opposite faces of which are secured, preferably by means of screws 17 2, angle edging plates 173. The edging plates 17'3 areprovided with perforations 174 for a purpose to be described later. A InoldlOa which is similar to the mold 10 is assembled upon the inside of the window-hanging frame 170 in practically the same manner as the mold 10 is assembled'upon the frame 66, with the exception that the middle mold member is dispensed with in the mold 10a and theinner edges 175 and .176 of outer and `inner mold members 71a and 72a thereof are` modified so these modified edgesv 17 5 and .176 might lit neatlyV into recesses 177 and 178 formed in the inner face of the opening 179 of the frame 170, l

An inner bracing frame 180 is then applied to rigidly assemble the outer and inner mold members 712L and 72a upon the frame 17'0, as clearly shown in Figs. 13 and 14. It will clearly be understood that as a result of dispensing with the intermediate mold' member 70 in the mold 10a, the frame 170 is not adjustable as is the frame 66 to varyits Vrelative distance from the opposite faces Vof the wall 12.

The reason for providing the frame 170' between the Casement 65 and the frame 170.V

The perforations 174 are for the purpose of receiving cement so that the edging plates 173 will not entirely divide the material of the easement and thereby weaken the structure thereof.

Fig 17 shows a novel cornice 190 which :angle irons 192 and 193 which rest upon the upper end of boards 195 which are sawed out so as to fit into the inequalities of the mold 191 and rigidly hold the angle irons 192 and 193 thereagainst. The boards 195 are secured to the outer facing member 13 of member 13, which might be set up opposite the uppermost course of slabs 197 of the inner facing member 14, is omitted. When the top of the wall 12 is poured the cornice 190 is thereby 'formed integrally with the interior of the wall'.

A gutter 198 may be formed in the upper face of the cornice 190 by the placing of a tube. 199 in the upper surface of the plastic concrete when this is poured into the mold 191, this tube being shown in dotted lines in Fig. 17.

.A tile roof 200 is shown mounted upon the` top of the Wall 12 as in the completion of the building in which the wall 12 is a part.

I claim as my invention:

l'. A method of molding in a wall opening7 va casing, the opening of which is bordered with a frame which makes a weathertight fit with said casing, said method comprising: assembling said mold upon said frame; erecting said wall about saidl mold; securing said mold to said wall; and casting said. casing inI said mold.

2. A method Vof :forming a casing in an opening in a'composite wall having facings held in spaced relation and united by concrete poured therebetween, said method comri'sinv: erectin said aoin s to indicate a portion of said openings; securing a casing mold upon. said Jr'acingsf aboutv said opening; and pouring concrete into the space between said Jfacings and in said` mold.

3. A method of forming a casing in an opening in a composite wall having acings held in spaced relation and united by Concrete poured therebetween, said method com-Y prising: erecting said facings to indicate a `portion of said opening; assembling a mold upon. a casing opening frame; securing said mold upon said facings about said opemng;

and pouring concrete into the space between said facings and in said mold in a manner to anch-orsaid frame to said casing.

4. A method of i'orming a casing in an opening ina composite wall having facings held in spaced relation and united by concrete poured therebetween, said method comprising: erecting said facings to indicate a portion ofsaid opening; assembling a mold upon ay casing opening frame; securing s aidmold upon saidacings about saidi openf, ing; pouring concreteinto the space between said acings and said mold in aman-ner to anchor said frame'to said casing; and diosas'- sembling' said mold from said frame and 'said facings when saidk concrete has hardened.

5. An apparatus for forming a casing in r a wall opening and comprising: a casing mold adapted to be assembled upon a Casing opening frame to form a unitary assembly.

6. An apparatus for forming a casing in a wall opening and comprising: a casing mold adapted to be assembled upon a. reotangular casing openingvframe to form a uni-i tary assembly, said mold being telescopic to fit frames of various'dimensions.

7 An apparatus, for forming a casingy in a wall opening and comprising: a casing mold adapted to be assembled upon a rectangular casing opening frame to form ,a unitary assembly, said mold being telescopic to fit window openings of various'dimensions.

8. An apparatus for forming a casing in a wall opening and comprising: a` casing mold adapted to be assembled upon a casing opening frame to form a unitary assembly;

and means for uniting said mold temporarib7 with said casing opening frame.

9. An apparatus for forming a casing in a wall opening and comprising: a casing mold having two side members, one of which is adapted to be disposed upon each side of the wall; and means or unitingsa-id members in said opening to form said mold.

10. -An apparatus` for forming a casing in a wall opening and comprising: a casing mold having two sidemembers, one of which isadapted to be disposed upon each side of the Wall; andl means for uniting said mem- `bers in said opening to torni saidemold, said members being telescopic to-permit said mold to it wall' openings of different size. 11. An appara-tus for-forming a casing-in a wall opening .and comprising: a casing mold having two side members, one of which is adapted tobe disposedI upon each side, of the wall; and means Afor uniting said members in said opening upon a casingr opening frame which it is desired to' anchor toY said casing.

12. Anapparatus for forming ay casing in a wall opening and comprising.: a casing mold having twoside members,one of which is adapted to be disposed upon each side of the wall; and means for unitingsai'd members in said opening upon a casing'opening frame which it is desired' to, anchor to said casing, said members being telescopic to permit said mold'to fit wall' openings of different size.

13. An apparatus for fforminga casing in a wall opening and comprisingsa oasingmold having two side members,V one of vwhich-'is adapted to be` disposed upon each'side of the wall, and a centralv memberadapted-l to f be-,disposed within said; opening 5. andmeans for uniting said side members with said central member to form said mold.

14:. An apparatus for forming a casing 1n a wall opening and comprising: a casing mold having two side members, one of which is adapted to be disposed upon each side of the wall, and a central member adapted to be disposed within said opening; and means for uniting said side members with said central member to form said mold, said members being telescopic to permit said mold to fit wall openings of different size.

15. An apparatus for forming a casing in a wall opening and comprising: a casing mold having two side members, one of which is adapted to be disposed upon each side of the wall, and a central member adapted to be disposed within said opening; and means for uniting said side members with said central member upon a casing opening frame which it is desired to anchor to said casing.

16. An apparatus for forming a cased opening in a composite wall having faces formed of slabs erected edge to edge and supported on the interior by concrete, said apparatus comprising: a demountable casing mold having an interior recess of the shape of said cased opening; and means for temporarily securing said mold to the slab facings of said wall.

17. A method of casting a finish to an opening in a wall having precast facing units interlocked edge to edge, comprising: assembling said units about said opening; attaching a mold to said units to form said finish; filling said mold with suitable plastic material; and removing said mold after due setting of said material.

18. A method of casting a finish to an opening in a wall faced upon both surfaces with precast units interlocked edge to edge, comprising: erecting said units about said opening; attaching a finishing mold to said facings by means extending through cracks between said units; filling said mold with suitable plastic material; and removing said mold after due setting of said materia-l.

19. A method of finishing an opening in a wall of interlocked precast units, comprising: erecting said units about said opening; attaching a mold through cracks between said units to form said finish; filling said mold with plastic finishing material; and removing said mold after due setting of said material.

20. A method of finishing an opening in a wall faced with precast units, comprising: attaching a mold to said facings through cracks between said units and casting a finish in said mold.

21. A method of finishing the edge of a wall faced with precast units interlocked edge to edge, comprising: attaching a mold through cracks between said units and casting a finish in said mold.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2515977 *May 26, 1948Jul 18, 1950Banneyer JosephForm apparatus for wall openings
US2557631 *Jun 12, 1948Jun 19, 1951Patrick J CallanCollapsible form for forming window or door openings in concrete walls
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Classifications
U.S. Classification264/35, 249/45, 249/39, 52/206, 249/37
International ClassificationE04B2/86, E04G15/00, E04G13/06, E04G15/02, E04G13/00
Cooperative ClassificationE04G13/06, E04B2/8652, E04G15/02
European ClassificationE04B2/86J, E04G13/06, E04G15/02