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Publication numberUS1865674 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 5, 1932
Filing dateNov 29, 1930
Priority dateNov 29, 1930
Publication numberUS 1865674 A, US 1865674A, US-A-1865674, US1865674 A, US1865674A
InventorsCarter John M
Original AssigneeCarter John M
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Joint or connecter for roofing sheets
US 1865674 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

July 5, 1932. J. M. CARTER JOINT OR CONNECTER FOR ROOFING SHEETS Filed Nov. 29, 1950 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 July 5, 1932. J. M. CARTER JOINT OR CONNECTER FOR ROOFING SHEETS Filed Nov. 29, 1950 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 Patented July-5, 1932 UNITED STATES JOHN I. CARTER, OI ORLANDO, FLORIDA :onn' OB- CONNEUIEB I03 ROOFING SHEETS Application filed llovember a, mo. mm Io.

This invention relates to sheet metal building construction and particularly to means for joining or connecting the edges of metal sheets, particularly of corrugated roofing. The eneral object of this invention is to provide a joint or connecter between the edges of two metal sheets of corru ated roofing of such character that the 'omt will be water-proof and that it will e iminate the waste caused b lapping.

A further ob ect is to provide a connection whichwill prevent snow or rain from blowing under the roofing along the lap.

A further object is to save time and labor in forming the corru ated roof and provide a connecter which wi aid or guide the workman in keeping the joints in straight lines, thus adding to the appearance of the roof or siding.

My invention is illustrated in the accompanying drawings, wherein Figure 1 is a top plan view of a plurality of roofing sheets or connecting elements or 'omts engaged therewith in accordance wit my invention; 1

Figure 2 is a section on the line 2-2 of Fi re 1;

igure 3 is a like view to Figure 2 but showing a variation in the cross section;

Figure 4 is a top plan view of the two sections or connecters telescoped;

Figure 5 is a section on the line 55 of Fi re 4;

Figure 6-is a transverse section through a connecter showing one means whereby it may be connected to a metal purlin;

Figure 7 is a section on the line 7-7 of 2, A and B are two corrugated sheets 0 metal such as are ordinarily used for roofing or siding. Such sheets as this are usually overlapped at the joint for about 1% corrugations. Such a joint as this is not completely water-proof and water might pass along said joint by capilla attraction and so that water will penetrate eneath the roof. Furthermore, this overlapping of the sheets is wasteful. To avoid this, I provide a connecter or (.jioint designated generally 10 having a me ally disposed, approximately cirenlarged head 17. The head 11 is then sli cular head 11. This bead is nearl closed at 12. The metal on each side of t 's head is earned laterally from the contracted portion 12 outward in opposite directions as at 13 and then extended upward, downward and inward as at 14 so as to form what ma be termed lateral beads. The side edges 0 the sheets A and B are forced down over these lateral beads and underneath the medial bead 11 so that the edges of the sheets A and B will en 'age the medial bead at the neck 12.

f course, the upper edge of each sheet A or Bis disposed beneath the overlap of an upper sheet and the lower edge of each sheet A or B is overlapped upon the sheet below. As illustrated in Figure 1, the joint 10 at its endshas extensions 15 forming the extensions of the flat portions 13 of the lateral head which are apertured for the passage of nails where this device is to be applied upon a wooden building. These jointor connecting members 10 are designed to have an desired standard length to corres 0nd wit the lengths of the metal sheets. has these joint or connecting members may have lengths of four, five, six, seven, eight, nine and twelve feet.

Where it is necessary to join one connecter 10 with an adjacent connecter, two connect- 'ers are telescoped into each other as illustrated in Figure 4. In this case, the head 11 of one connecter receives within it the bead 11 of the next connecter below, but preferably the lateral beads of the upper connecter will be inserted in the lateral beads of the lower connecter. This is illustrated in Figure 4. Where this connecter or joint is to be used on frame buildings, it is formed, as before stated, with the outwardly projecting lugs 15 by which it may be nailed to the sheathlng of the building or to the joists. Where this connecter is to be used on a metal frame buildin two bolts 16 are disposed, one on each si e of the purlin or other structural element, each of these bolts having as on to these bolts so that the shank o the bolt extends through the neck 12 and the head of the bolt is di osed within the bead 11. Thus these bolts old the connecter in place. Obviously the bolts may be connected to the metal framing of the building in any desired manner, provided the heads of the bolts are so formed as to fit'within the bead 11.

While I have illustrated in Figure 2 a con necter 10 which is formed with an approximatel circular bead 11 and with somewhat elliptical lateral beads, I do not wish to be limited to this. In Figure 3, I show a con necter designated 10 which is exactly like the connecter 10 except that the lateral beads are approximately triangular in cross section instead of being approximately ovoid in cross section.

In Figure 6, I illustrate a connecter 10 in which the medial bead 11" is approximate 1y triangular in cross section. lit will thus be seen that the exact form of the connecter in cross section may be varied widely without departing from the spirit of the invention as defined in the appended claims.

The connecter constructed in accordance with my invention not only makes a waterproof joint between two adjacent sheets and eliminates the waste caused by overlapping of the sheets, but such a joint aids or guides the roofer in keeping the joints in a straight line, thus adding very greatly to the appearance of the roof or siding. The joint illustrated will hold the edges of the corrugated sheets in proper position at all times and the lateral bead constitutes ducts whereby any water which may enter the joint will be carried downward and be discharged at the eaves with no chance of the water entering the joint and collecting between the sheets and the sheathing of the roof.

lit is very essential that the connecter 10 or 10 shall have a flat base with means to fasten the connecter securely to the sheathing boards to prevent the connecter from being turned up on either edge by wind getting under the roofing sheets and thus lifting one head or lateral channel higher than the other, causing an overflow of water. It is also particularly necessary that the margins of the lateral beads be extended downward and inward so as to secure a good contact withthe downwardly and inwardly extending margins of the lateral sheets, as shown most clearly in Figures 2 and 3, themar ins of the sheets A and B being extended ownward and inward, preventing water being blown out of the channel durin a heavy rain and wind storm, which pro uces whirling motion in the channels. The margins of the beads being extended inward and downward forces water back toward the neck of the connecter and out at the ends. If the margins of the lateral beads terminated perpendicularly against the roofing sheets or the margins of thhe lateral beads do not extend downward and inward and conform to the lateral margins of the roofing sheets, a whirling motion aeeae'm of the water in the channels forces water upward and outward between the margin and the roofing sheets, thus causing the water to go inside of the building instead of out through the channels.

A further object in extending the lateral margins of the beads inward and downward is to close the openings at the tops of the channels, which prevents the channels getting clogged. The margins of the roofing sheets being extended inward over the tops of the lateral beads holds the roofing sheets securely and forces upward on the edges of the roofing sheets, forcing them against the bottom of the central head. The pressure is uniform for the entire length of the roofing sheet and prevents rattling.

While I have illustrated my joint as applied toa corrugated metal roof or siding, I do not wish to be limited to this as fiat sheets might be used in place of corrugated sheets provided the lateral edges of the sheets are upwardly and then downwardly bent so as to extend down over the lateral beads of the joint and into position on each side of the metal bead of the oint.

ll claim 1. A connecter for roofing sheets formed to provide a medial upstanding bead and two integral lateral beads extending laterally in opposite directions from the base of the medial bead and having upwardly and then inwardly turned marginal portions.

2. A joint'or connecter for roofing sheets formed of a single strip of sheet metal, the strip being bent to form a medial upstanding head, the metal on each side of the neck of the bead being laterally extended to rest upon the sheathing of the building, then upwardly, inwardly and downwardly extended to form lateral heads.

3. The combination with parallel corrugated sheets of metal, of a connecter formed of a stri of metal bent to form a medial upstanding bead, the metal at the neck of said bead being laterally bent in opposite directions to lie against the building s eathing and then extended upward, inward and downward to ward said neck, the mar 'ns of the corrugated sheets being inserted etween said lateral beads and the medial bead with the edges approximating the neck of the medial bead and the material outward of said edges bearing against the upper faces of the lateral beads.

4. In a building, a building element, covering sheets therefor, a connecter between said covering sheets formed to provide a medial portion and lateral heads, the medial upstanding portion overhanging the lateral beads and having a contracted neck, the adjacent margins of the sheets being inserted between the medial portion and lateral beads and bearin against the upper faces of the lateral bea and bolts engaging with said building element and having eads disposed within the medial portion, the shanks of the bolts extending through the neck at the j unction of the medial portion with the lateral beads.

5. The combination with parallel corrugated sheets of metal, of a connecter formed of a strip of metal bent to form a medial upstanding portion having a neck, the metal at the neck of said medial portion being laterally bent in opposite directlons to lie against the building sheathin and then extended upward, inward an downward toward said neck, the margins of the corrugated sheets being inserted between said lateral beads and the medial portion with the edges approximating the neck of the medial bead, the strip being formed to provide longitudinally extending lugs whereby it may be attached to the sheathing of the building.

6. A joint or connecter for roofing sheets formed to provide a medial upstanding portion having a contracted neck and two integral and lateral beads having approximately flat lower surfaces extendinglaterally fromthe neck to lie against the sheathing of the building, then extending upward, inward and downward toward the neck of the medial portion.

7. Thecombination with two roofing sheets havin their adjacent margins upwar ly and then ownwardly curved, of a connecter for forming a joint between the two sheets comprising a strip of metal formed to provide a medial upstanding portion having a contracted neck, the metal at the neck of said medial portion being extended laterally and then exending upwardly, inwardly and downwardly to form lateral heads, the margins of the metal sheets being inserted between the medial portion and the lateral beads and bearing against the upper surfaces of the lateral beads and at their inner edges bearing against the under surface of the medial portion.

8. In combination with roofing or siding sheets having their adjacent ends upwardly and then downwardly curved, of a plurality of connecters, each connecter being formed of a strip of metal formed to provide a medial upstanding portion havin a constricted neck, the metal on each side of t e neck being laterally extended and then extended upward, inward and downward, the curved margins of the sheets being disposed over the lateral beads so formed and inserted in the lateral beads and 'the under surface of the medial portion, successive connecters having their medial portions and lateral beads telescoped. In testimony whereof I hereunto aflix my signature.

JOHN M. CARTER.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2969754 *May 13, 1955Jan 31, 1961Acme Steel CoRoof structure
US3149436 *Jan 30, 1958Sep 22, 1964Giovanni VarlongaPanel construction for covering walls and the like
US3397500 *Jul 20, 1966Aug 20, 1968Robert Watson Jr.Building structure with alternating structural members and panels in compression
US4192115 *Feb 23, 1978Mar 11, 1980Ryohei YamamotoElongated shingle assembly
US7658044 *Apr 12, 2007Feb 9, 2010Airbus Deutschland GmbhGap covering for cabin panels
DE1289645B *Aug 9, 1958Feb 20, 1969Varlonga GiovanniAussenwandverkleidung fuer Gebaeude
DE1509242B1 *Dec 20, 1963May 21, 1970Const Metalliques Fillod S AWandverkleidung aus plattenfoermigen blechelementen
Classifications
U.S. Classification52/459, 52/470
International ClassificationE04D3/366, E04D3/36
Cooperative ClassificationE04D3/366
European ClassificationE04D3/366