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Publication numberUS1865734 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 5, 1932
Filing dateSep 19, 1928
Priority dateSep 19, 1928
Publication numberUS 1865734 A, US 1865734A, US-A-1865734, US1865734 A, US1865734A
InventorsWieland George G
Original AssigneeJ C Penny Company Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Store furniture
US 1865734 A
Images(2)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

G. G. WIELAND July 5, 1932.

S TORE FURN,I TURE Filed Sept. 19 '1928 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 ATTORNEYS G. G. WIELAND STORE FURNITURE July 5, 1932.

Filed Sept. 19, 1928 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 E T TM 0 @w a if W Z 02/ .n 4/ 5 .7; q JF M 47 w w 6 #6 xxx Patented July 5, 1932 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE GEORGE G. WIELAND, OF BROOKLYN, NEW YORK, ASSIGNOR TO J. C. PENNY COMPANY, INC., OF NEW YORK, N. Y., A CORPORATION OF NEW YORK STORE FURNITURE Application filed September 19, 1928.

This invention relates to store furniture which may be readily shipped and stored in knock-down form and assembled and disassembled with rapidity and ease by one who is not especially skilled in furniture construction.

The principal object of this invention is to provide this knock-down store furniture in standardized, pre-formed units which may be assembled into attractively-finished and durable complete sections of store furniture arranged and designed to suit merchandise requirements, as many of these sections being arranged separately or side-by-side as may be necessary and in as many different combinations as desirable or as space limitations permit.

This and other apparent objects are accomplished by providing, among other elements, a number of frames adapted to be arranged vertically along the wall of a store, each of these frames being provided with a finished pilaster which makes invisible and seals the locked joints between each frame and the ad jacent top and bottom front rails which space the frames and secure each adjacent pair of them into a solid section which may then be provided with merchandise shelves, drawers, racks, or the like. The end frames of the last sections are fitted with a finished side slab, and the open to of each section is fitted with a top slab whic rests upon and is secured to the top stringers of adjacent frames. The visible pilasters, rails and end slabs are preferably made of surfaced metal or veneered or solid cabinet wood, and are attractively finished with cornices and mouldings so as to present the appearance of a cabinet-made piece of furniture, while the invisible rear frame-work and the like may consist of inexpensive wood or metal. Other details of construction and arrangements of elements will be explained in the succeeding description of the accompanying drawings.

For a better understanding of the invention, reference is made to the accompanying drawings, in which Figure 1 is a perspective view of the knockdown store furniture of this invention as it appears when assembled for use;

Serial No. 306,862.

Fig. 2 is a rear perspective View showing the method of arranging the frames and rails preparatory to assembling;

Figs. 3 and 4 show fragmentary perspective views of top rail and bottom rail assemblies, respectively;

Figs. 5 to 8 inclusive are fragmentary views of various details of construction; and

Figs. 9 and 10 are perspective illustrations of several methods of application of the assembled sectional store furniture of this invention. 1

In these drawings, with particular reference to Fig. 2, numeral 10 designates one of the frames which comprise front and back vertical stiles 11 and 12, which are connected at their top and bottom ends by rails 13 and 14; respectively, these rails being mortised and glued to the stiles or otherwise se curely attached thereto. Secured to the front edge of the front stile 11 is an ornamental pilaster 15 which is preferably attractively finished and provided with a cornice 15 at its top end. The top and bottom ends of front stile 11 are preferably notched so as to form slots 16 and 17 with the rear surface of pilaster 15. Holes 18 and 19 are provided in front stile 11 adjacent slots 16 and 17 respectively. A number of these frames 10 are formed complete, each of which forms one end of the sectional unit of store furniture of this invention.

In order to complete the structure of the sectional unit, top and bottom rails 20 and 21, respectively, are provided, these rails being of equal length and of a suitable length so as to space frames 10 the proper distance apart in the manner to be described. The inside surface of each top rail 20 is provided with blocks 22, one at each end, these blocks being screwed or otherwise securely fastened to the rails and provided with a longitudinal hole 23 corresponding to hole 18 in front stile 11 of frame 10. The slot 16 of frame 10 is made of such size as to allow rails 20 to fit closely therein, so that when the rails are placed in this position, holes 23 in blocks 22 will register with hole 18 in front stile 11. In order to space adjacent top rails 20 from each other so that the adjacent ends thereof will each extend slightly less than half-way into slot 16, each of rails 20 is provided with a cornice 24 on itsfront surface which is also shaped to provide ornamentation and so as to conform to the design on cornice 15 on pilaster 15, which the ends of cornices 24 abut. A neck moulding 24 is also provided along the lower edge of the outer surface of each top rail, the ends of which are adapted to abut the corresponding edges of pilaster 15, and thus space and additionally brace the rail against the pilaster:

As shown particularly in Fig. 3, top rails 20 are secured to each other and to frame 10 by passing rail bolt 25 through registering holes 23 and 18 and then tightening nut 26 upon the threaded end of rail bolt 25 so that rails 20 are drawn towards each other and rigidly locked in slot 16 and to frame 10. This rigid structure is obtained, not only by the bolt and slots, but by the abutment of the fiat sides of blocks 22 with the corresponding surfaces to front stile 11 and by the abutment of the squared ends of mouldings 24 and 24 with the corresponding edges of pilaster 15 and its cornice 15.

As also shown in Fig. 2 and particularly in Fig. 4, much the same arrangement is employed for connecting bottom rails 21 together and to frame 10. Each of these bottom rails 21 is provided with an elongated block 27 screwed or otherwise securely fastened to the inner surface of bottom rails 21 and opposite ends thereof, each of these blocks being provided with a longitudinal hole 28 which is adapted to register with hole 19 in the lower end of front stile 11 of frame 10. The bottom rails 21 are preferably not provided with cornices or the like, and in order to secure the same lateral rigidity provided by the mouldings 24 and 24 of top rails 20, the front surfaces of bottom rails 21 are undercut so as to form tenons 29 which fit closely within slot 17 of frame 10 while the shoulders 30 of these tenons abut the corresponding edges of pilaster 15 to provide the desired lateral rigidity, whi'ch is reinforced by the abutment of-the fiat surfaces of elongated blocks 27 with the corresponding surfaces of front stile 11. When the bottom rails 21 are placed so that their tenons 29 fit closely into slot 17 and the tenon shoulders 30 engage the edges of pilaster 15, holes 19 and 28 will register and the rail bolt 31 may be slipped therethrough and secured by tightening the nut 32, thus forming a rigid structure at the bottom as well as the top of the frame 10.

In order to complete a two-section store furniture unit, two other frames are secured to the top and bottom rails in the manner described, shorter rail bolts 25 and 31 being employed as shown in Figs. 3 and 4 because of the absence of one of the two blocks 22 and 27 at the top and bottom rails 20 and 21, respectively. Obviously, these sections may be erected by arranging a plurality of these top and bottom rails and frames into as long a piece of store furniture as may be required, the whole piece being as rigid as a piece of cabinet-made furniture because of the rigid structure and connections described. Inasmuch as the front surfaces of pilaster 15, rails 20 and 21, mouldings 24 and 24, and cornices 15 are attractively finished in the manner of cabinet-made furniture if made of wood, and as attractively surfaced if made of metal, the series of sectional units thus arranged will have the attractive appearance of readymade cabinet furniture.

Referring to Figs. 3 and 5, it will be seen that the top surfaces of top rails 13 and stiles 11 and 12 of frames 10 are depressed below the top edges of top rails 20 for the reception of the top slabs 33, which are as wide as the depth of the frame 10 exclusive of the pilaster 15, and as long as the distance between the longitudinal center lines of top rails 13 of adjacent frames 10, so that the adjacent ends of top slabs 33 may be fastened to the same corresponding top rail 13 by means of screws or the like so that the top slabs 33 of adjacent sectional units will abut each other edge to edge along the center lines of the top rails 13. These top slabs are preferably finished to correspond with the finish of the other parts of the unit and they lie flush with the upper edges of the top rails 20 and add rigidity to the unit by bracing these top rails and the frame 10 as will be apparent from Fig. 5. In addition these slabs are preferably of sufficient strength to support the weight of a man and the slabs may be used to support displays which can be set up along the length of the unit.

As shown in Fig. 6, the bottom of each secti onal unit is preferably formed by a bottom shelf 34 which rests upon the top edges of bottom rails 21 and bottom rails 14 of frames 10, these bottom shelves 34 being of a width equal to the depth of frame 10, exclusive of the pilaster 15 and of a length equal to the distance between the center lines of bottom rails 14 of adjacent frames 10. They may also be mortised at their four corners to accommodate the stiles 11 and 12 of the frames 10. These bottom shelves 34 appear in position as shown in Fig. 6, and may or may not be screwed or otherwise fastened to the top edges of front rails 21 or the top edges of adjacent bottom rails 14, or to both.

In order to finish and enclose the end of one of the sectional units described, an end slab or panel 35 is provided as shown in Fig. 7, and in order to present an attractive finished appearance and to lie flush with the end edges of pilaster 15 and moulding 24, afiller 36 is placed between the end frame 10 and end panel 35, this filler being of suflicient thickness to cause the outer surface of panel 35 to lie flush with the outer edge of pilaster and its cornice 15'. This end panel is also attractively finished in the manner of the other outer surfaces of the sectional unit so as to blend therewith, and is provided with dummy pilasters-37 and 38 at opposite edges, a dummy bottom rail 39, and cornices 40 and 41 corresponding to pilasters 37 and 38, re- .spectively, a moulding 42 j oining cornices 40 and 41, a neck moulding 42 joiningpilasters 37 and 38, and a corner cornice 43 placed between cornice 40 and the corresponding 'cornice 15' at the front of the sectional unit,

as is shown especially in Figs. 1 and 7. This end slab or end panel is furnished com lete with its dummy pilasters, rails, moul ings and cornices, and may be attached to the end frame 10 by means of inside screws or the like as shown in Fi 7.

In Fig. 8 is grown a modified form of the sectional unit of furniture, which is preferably of greater width but of less height than the modifications previously described and is adapted to be placed in the center of the store or at least away from the wall so as to be'accessible from opposite sides. In this form the standard frames 10' are provided with front stiles 11' and 11", whereas the rear stile 12 of original frame 10, shown in Fig. 2, becomes the center stile 12'. Conmeeting these stiles are top rails 13 and also corresponding bottom rails, not shown, but which correspond to rails 14 of frame 10 shown in Fig. 2. The two front stiles 11 and 11" are provided with pilasters 15", but instead of connecting the frames 10' with the type of rail shown in the preceding drawings, simple moulding rails 44 of proper length are provided, these rails being secured to frames 10' by screws or any other suitable fastening so as to project above the top ends of pilasters 15" and the top edges of frames 10'. Each of frames 10 is provided with horizontal blocks 45, the blocks 45 of adjacent frames 10' having registering openings for the passage of rail bolts 46 in the manner described in connection with the preceding modifications, whereby adjacent frames may be bolted together to make as many sectional units as may be necessary or as space limitations may allow. The polished top 47 fits between the projecting edges of cornice rails 44 so as to lie flush with the upper edges thereof and rest upon the top surfaces of frames 10' and attached blocks 45, each section of the polished top 47 extending between the center lines of adjacent frames 10' and being preferably screwed from the underside to blocks 45 in the manner illustrated in Fig. 8, the top 47 thus resembling the relationship to the frames as shown in the arrangement illustrated in Fig. 3 in connection with the principal embodiment of the invention.

As shown in Figs. 1 and 8, the stiles of the frames 10 or 10 are preferably provided with metallic strips 48 having spaced apertures, notches,-or slots for the reception of adjustable ratchet brackets 49, upon which shelves 50 rest, as shown in Fig. 1. In Fig. 8, the shelving is divided into two sections by providing two sets of shelving strips 48 whereby the shelves when emplaced may be staggered with respect to each other or otherwise arranged to suit various types of merchandise which are stored or displayed upon the shelving. Obviously,-the relatively low top of the unit shown in Fig. 8 may also be used for displaying various types of merchandise.

Figs. 1 and 8 illustrate two modifications of the application of the invention, while Figs. 9 and 10 illustrate other modifications. In Fig. 9, longitudinal hang rods 51 are provided, each being equal in length to the length of a sectional unit, i. e., the distance between frames 10. Each end of each of these rods is secured to a cross bar 52, the opposite ends of which rest upon ratchet brackets 53, which are vertically adjustable upon bracket strips 54 secured to the front and rear stiles of each frame. If preferred, two tiers of merchandise, such as mens suits and ladies dresses may be provided for by placing a similar set of hang rods 51', secured to cross bars 52', which are vertically adjustable upon ratchet brackets 53' mounted in bracket strips 54'. Obviously, various other modifications of this method of employing the sectional unit of store furniture may be adopted.

In Fig. 10 the shelving 50 is provided in the usual way, except that the upper part of the sectional unit is provided with a sliding casing 55, divided into a series of pi eon holes 56 of any suitable size and enclose by sliding doors, preferably of glass 57, whereby the merchandise in pigeon holes 56 may be displayed and identified. Casing is made removable so that it may be inserted at any time or omitted if desired. Various other conceivable modifications and arrangements of the sectional unit constituting the store furniture of this inventionmaybe developed to accommodate merchandising needs, but these modifications are too numerous to illustrate, and those already described will suflice to adequately disclose the invention.

It will be seen that the simple and economical design of the store furniture of this invention enables the convenient packing and shipping of standardized elements which may be readily erected by unskilled persons into many and various kinds of sectional units of store furniture. Each unit is rigid and durable, presenting the attractive appearance of cabinet-made furniture without involving the bulk, liability of damage, and expense in transportation, and without requiring the labor of previously making elaborate measurements and then designing and constructing each piece of necessary store furniture to suit the particular and peculiar purposes for which it may be required. Vhile various modifications and particular arrangements of construction and assembling have. been illustrated and described, it is to be understood that the invention is susceptible to many other modifications within its scope and is not to be limited to the particular forms and constructions illustrated and described herein.

I claim:

1. In knock-down furniture construction, the combination of a plurality of vertical frames each consisting of a front post, a rear post and a top and a bottom rail connecting said posts, a plurality of rails spacing and engaging adjacent frames and lying in end-to-end relationship, said frames having slots for the reception of the ends of said aligned rails, and readily removable locking means engaging said rails and frames for rigidly securing said rails in the slots.

2. In knock-down furniture construction, the combination of a plurality of vertical frames each consisting of front and rear posts and a top and a bottom rail connecting said posts, a plurality of rails adapted to space adjacent frames and lying in end-toend relationship. said rails having shoulders adapted to abut the posts, and locking means for securing said rail shoulders in rigid abutment with the posts.

3. In knock-down store furniture, the combination of a post, a pilaster secured to the front face of the post, a pair of horizontal rails disposed in end-to-end alignment and extending in opposite directions laterally with respect to said post, the pilaster having a portion at its end spaced from the front face of the post in which space lie the ends of the rails, a cornice attached to each rail on the outer face thereof, the ends of the cornices being spaced apart to receive said portion of the pilaster between them, and means including a readily removable element for drawing said rails with their cornices toward each other with the ends of the cornices abutting the edges of said portion of the pilaster and frictionally holding said pilaster in place.

4. In knock-clown store furniture, the combination of a post having a recess formed in its front face near one end, a pilaster secured to the post and extending over said recess, a pair of horizontal rails disposed in end-to-end alignment and extending in opposite directions laterally with respect to said post, the ends of the rails lying in said recess, a cornice attached to each rail on the outer face thereof, the ends of the cornices being spaced apart to receive the pilaster between them, and means including a readily removable element for drawing said rails with their cornices toward each other with the ends of the cornices abutting the edges of said portion of the pilaster and frictionally holdingsaid pilaster in place.

5. In knock-down store furniture, the combination of a post having a recess formed in its front face near one end, a pilaster secured to the post and extending over said recess, a pair of horizontal rails disposed in end-to-end alignment and extending in opposite directions laterally with respect to said post, the ends of the rails lying in said recess, and said rails being provided with recesses forming shoulders abutting the edges of the pilaster, and means including a readily removable element for drawing the rails toward each other and for connecting the rails and the post.

6. In knock-down store furniture, the combination of a post, a pilaster secured to the front face of the post, a space being formed between the post and pilaster near the upper end thereof, a pair of top rails disposed in end-to-end alignment and extending in opposite directions laterally with respect to said post, the ends of the rails lying in the space between the post and pilaster, a cornice attached to each rail on the outer face thereof, each cornice terminating short of the ends of its rail to provide a space between said cornices in which said pilaster is received, and means including a readily removable element for drawing said rails with their cornices toward each other and for connecting said rails and said post.

7. An article of knock-down furniture for a store comprising a plurality of frames defining sections, adjacent sections having one frame in common and each frame being made up of front and rear posts, a single horizontal rail connecting the posts at the top and a single horizontal rail connecting the posts at the bottom, a pilaster on each front post, a space being provided between the pilaster and post near one end thereof, horizontal rails extending between front posts of adjacent frames at top and bottom, adjacent rails at one end of said post lying in end-to-end alignment with their ends in said space and behind the pilaster, means including a readily removable element for drawing adjacent rails toward each other, and means on said rails having their ends in said space for engaging and clamping the edges of said pilaster to frictionally hold the same in place.

8. In knock-down store furniture, the combination of a post having a pilaster on one face thereof, a space being provided between the post and pilaster at one end thereof, a pair of rails lying in end-to-end alignment with their ends in said space, said rails having cut-out portions forming shoulders between which said pilaster lies, and means including a readily removable element for securing the rails together to cause said shou ders to clamp the edges of said pilaster and frictionally hold the same in place.

9. In knock-down furniture construction,

the combination of a plurality of vertical frames, each consisting of front and rear posts and a top and a bottom rail connecting said posts, rails spacing adjacent frames at top and bottom, said rails having rearwardly projecting portions adjacent to the ends abutting the posts, and readily removable means engaging the rearwardly projecting portions of the contiguous rails for tightly binding together contiguous rails and intervening posts.

10. In knock-down furniture construction,

the combination of aplurality of vertical posts, a pilaster secured to the front face of each post, a pair of horizontal rails disposed in end-to-end alignment extending in opposite directions laterally with respect to each post, spaces being formed between said pilasters and the posts on which they are mounted for the reception of the ends of said rails, and readily removable locking means engaging said rails and posts for rigidly securing said posts and rails together.

In testimony whereof I aflix my signature.

GEORGE G. WIELAND.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3170742 *Apr 14, 1961Feb 23, 1965Kason Display Hardware IncDisplay and storage fixtures
US3252433 *Oct 22, 1963May 24, 1966Khoury Bros IncFurniture assembly
US3329473 *Feb 18, 1965Jul 4, 1967Tacoma Cabinet & Fixture CoExpansible cabinet with interchangeable components
US7562951 *Mar 18, 2005Jul 21, 2009Windquest Companies, Inc.Wall cabinet system
US20130186844 *Jan 21, 2013Jul 25, 2013Parker House Mfg Co., Inc.Removable pilaster bookcase extension system
Classifications
U.S. Classification312/107, 312/257.1, 312/140, 211/187, 403/217
International ClassificationA47B47/05, A47B47/00
Cooperative ClassificationA47B47/05
European ClassificationA47B47/05