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Publication numberUS1865785 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 5, 1932
Filing dateMay 19, 1928
Priority dateMay 19, 1928
Publication numberUS 1865785 A, US 1865785A, US-A-1865785, US1865785 A, US1865785A
InventorsParker William S
Original AssigneeBurson Knitting Company
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Dust puff
US 1865785 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Jufiy 5, 1932. w. s. PARKER 9 9 DUST PUFF Filed May 19, 1928 WILLIAM Patented July 5, 1932 v UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE S. PARKER, OF ROCKFORD, ILLINOIS, ASSIGNOR T BURSON KNITTING COM- PANY, OF ROCKFORD, ILLINOIS, A CORPORATION OF ILLINOIS nusr PUFF Applicationfiled May 19, 1928. Serial No. 278,960.

This invention relates to a dust 'pufl and the method of making the same.

A dust pufi' in order to serve most efii- 'ciently should have a very resilient body, the parts of which should be so interlocked that they will not become disengaged readily and form separated bunches or'lumps which do not cooperate with each other. A good dust pufi also should be free from the tendency to harden and become incrusted when a cleaning oil is used with it in dusting and polishing.

The materials used in the making of this dust pufi" have been so selected and arranged that each of the above desirable qualities is incorporated in the resulting dust pu fi and other qualities peculiar tothis invention are also found to be possessed by the dustpufl I made from this process.

One of the objects of this invention is to provide a dust pufi made of fibrous material which naturally assumes and retains an ellipsoidal shape which is suitable for use in dusting.

Another object of this invention is to provide a dust mop which is composed of a plura-lity of strands of fibrous material and having both ends of each strand securely tied so that none of the ends may become free.

Another object of this invention is to provide a dust pufi' which is composed of strands of fibrous material and having both ends of each strand brought into a single knot where the ends are 'firmly secured into a compact knot whichalso serves as a grip for the user.

Another object of this invention is to provide a dust pufl' made of many strands of a fibrous material, each strand having previously been given a kinky form by means of knitting or some other suitable operation so that the strands when laid in proximity to each other in many layers will become considerably intermeshed and interlocked by means of the interengagement of their kinky portions.

Another object of this invention is to provide a process for making a dust pufi' which will produce a compact puff whosekinky strands are so Well intermeshed as to prevent.

the. puff from separating into disconnected bunches and yet which is assembled by a very simple arrangement of successive layers wound one upon the other.

Another object of this invention is to provide a method of making a dust pufi' from kinky strands of fibrous material which fac'ilitates and cheapens the problem of tying the ends of the strands so that they may not become loose and separated from the puff.

Another object of this invention'is to provide a method of making dust puffs which utilizes kinky strands of fibrous material,

which strands may be prepared by knitting moval from the reel,

Fig. 8 shows another elevation of the dust pufi? taken at 90 to Fig. 2 showing that the pufls are ellipsoids more closely resembling an egg in shape than the common circulartype of door knob,

Fig. 4; shows one of the pufl's after it has been cut from the double pufi shown in Figs 2 and 3, and

Fig. 5 shows how. conveniently the'knot in the puff may be grasped when the puff is being used. I v

Referring in detail to the drawing, a knitted tubular piece 1 is held in some suitable relation to, the reel by means which is not shown 'nor which is material to this invention. The strands are raveled from it as indicated and pass through a loop 2 mounted on a reciprocating bar 3 which moves alternately to the right and to the left as indicated by the arrows. The group of strands after passing through the guide loop 2 are wound upon a simple reel having the separated rods 4. The apparatus for rotating the reel is not material to this invention and need not be shown. The reciprocation of the guide loop 2 will cause the groups of strands to be wound in successive layers which are crisscrossed. This crisscrossing is employed in order to bring about the most effective intermingling of the kinky portions of the strands.

After a suflicient number of layers have been incorporated in the loop 5 of the intermeshed material, the group 6 of strands is severed and the loop of wound material is removed from the reel. The loop of intermeshed strands is now pinched together at its middle in a plane through the axis of the loop and is tied-very firmly at the two separate points '4' and 8 which causes the outside portions of the loop of wound material to naturally form into two ellipsoidal puffs 9 and 10.

After the two separated ties are completed a sharp knife cuts through the narrowed portion of the puff on the line 11-11 which results in producing two puffs 9 and 10 each of which has a central button 12 in which both ends of each strand of the puif are securely tied. Not only does the button 12, or knot, hold the ends of the strands securely and permanently but this button also serves as a convenient grip for the user. The thumb and fingers may be inserted in back of this button if desired or they may grip the button as shown in Fig. 5. This button is such a firm and compact body that it may be used for attachment to a handle if desired.

It is found that a dust puff made in accordance with this process naturally forms into an ellipsoidal shape which it continues to retain even with prolonged use. This shape is of course most convenient for its intended uses. The kinky strands produced by the knitting are found to intermesh and interlock in such a way that they do not sep arate in hunches and groups even though they are subjected to hard usage and despite the tendency which cleaning oils have to mat strands of fibrous material together. The kinky shape of the strands also gives this pufi unusual resiliency which makes it more useful in absorbing dust and oil and which increases the utility of the dust pufl. Not only do the kinks in the strands as produced by the previous knitting process give the puff the characteristics above described but it also provides a much larger puff than could be isomer layers, until a desired quantity of intermeshed layers are formed, bringing opposite sides of the loop together to bring the strands at that point into close relation with one another in cylindrical form and tying the strands in compressed relation, whereby the looped ends are caused to flare out to form puffs.

2. The method of making dust puffs comprising winding raveled strands in a continuous loop in superimposed intermeshed layers, compressing the loop intermediate its ends, binding the strands together in the compressed portion at two separated points, and cutting the compressed portion of the loop between the two said points to thereby produce two independent puffs each having both ends of its strands firmly secured under its respective bound portion.

3. A method of making dust puffs comprising winding kinky strands in a continuous loop in superimposed layers to cause the kinky portions of adjacent strands to intermesh, bringing opposite sides of the loop together into a compact cylindrical body and securing them together, and securing two portions of each strand in said body and the intermediate portion of each strand being extended from said body in a loop through the intermeshed layers.

i. The method of making dust puffs comprising winding kinky raveled strands into a loop having a plurality of intermeshed resilient layers of kinky strands, compressing together into cylindrical form and tying in the compressed relation opposing sides of the loop to hold the strands so tied in a fixed mutual relation, whereby the intermediate porl tions of said strands pufl outwardly from the tied portion in an ellipsoidal resilient body.

5. The method of making dust puffs comprising Winding kinky raveled strands into a loop having a plurality of intermeshed resilient layers of kinky strands, compressing together in cylindrical form and tying in the compressed relation opposed sides of the loop at spaced points to hold the strands so tied in a fixed mutual relation, whereby the intermediate portions of said strands pufi outward from the tied portion in an ellipsoidal resilient body, and cutting the strands of fibrous material between said spaced points to produce two separate pufis.

In witness of the foregoing T affix my signature.

l/VILLTAM S. PARKER.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2544216 *Apr 30, 1947Mar 6, 1951Brackmann Frederick ABathing implement
US5465452 *Mar 31, 1994Nov 14, 1995The Procter & Gamble CompanyImplement for personal cleansing made from extruded plastic scrim
US5491864 *Nov 14, 1994Feb 20, 1996The Procter & Gamble CompanyImplement for personal cleansing and method of construction
US5594970 *Jan 31, 1995Jan 21, 1997The Procter & Gamble CompanyPersonal cleansing implement using knitted tubing
US5667612 *Jul 26, 1996Sep 16, 1997The Procter & Gamble CompanyPersonal cleansing implement using knitted tubing and method of construction
US5715561 *Apr 12, 1996Feb 10, 1998The Procter & Gamble CompanyPersonal cleansing implement made of stretched scrim providing softness benefit
US5758386 *Sep 17, 1996Jun 2, 1998Chen; Ching-ChenBath scrubber
US5797526 *Aug 9, 1996Aug 25, 1998Wenzer Group, Inc.Method for creating a decorative bow
US5863844 *Jun 27, 1996Jan 26, 1999The Procter & Gamble CompanySoftness, resilience
US5904409 *Jul 24, 1998May 18, 1999The Procter & Gamble CompanyMethod for manufacturing a scrubbing apparatus
US6146745 *Jun 27, 1996Nov 14, 2000The Procter & Gamble CompanyOpen cell mesh and method for characterizing a mesh
US6156418 *Aug 8, 1996Dec 5, 2000The Procter & Gamble CompanyWashing implement comprising an improved open cell mesh
US6165603 *Aug 8, 1996Dec 26, 2000Procter & Gamble CompanyWashing implement comprising an improved open cell mesh
US6227621 *Mar 4, 1999May 8, 2001Ching-Chen ChenBathing ball structure
Classifications
U.S. Classification300/21, 15/209.1, 28/171, 28/147, 140/71.00C
International ClassificationA47L13/07, A47L13/02
Cooperative ClassificationA47L13/07
European ClassificationA47L13/07