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Publication numberUS1866222 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 5, 1932
Filing dateJun 2, 1931
Priority dateJun 2, 1931
Publication numberUS 1866222 A, US 1866222A, US-A-1866222, US1866222 A, US1866222A
InventorsLuther Pledger Martin
Original AssigneeEgan Cotton Mills
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Knitting needle
US 1866222 A
Images(1)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

July 5, 1932. M. l.. PLEDER 1,366,222

KNITTING NEEDLE .Filed June 2. 1931 INVENTOR @lari/'HA 77661961 ATTORNEY Patented July 5, 1932 UNITED STATES vPATENT OFFICE MARTIN LUTHER PLEDGER, OF ATLANTA, GEORGIA, ASSIGNOR TO EGAN COTTON MILLS,

OF ATLANTA, GEORGIA., A CORPORATION yOIE GEORGIA l KN'ITTING NEEDLE Application led J'une 2, 1931. Serial No. 541,643.

This invention relates to knitting needles for knitting machines, and more particularly to a needle adapted to be used in knitting a pdding backed with woven burlap or the li e.

One of the principal objects of the invention is to provide a needle having an inner needle reciprocally mounted Within the outer needle, the hook of the inner needle being lo- 1 0 cated Within a slotted portion of the hook of the main or outer needle, whereby, when the inner needle is in one extremity of its movement, its hook will be in position to receive the thread for the formation of a stitch, and

when at the opposite extremity of its movement, will transfer the thread partially to the hook of the outer needle, and whereby the hook of the inner needle will be held against lateral displacelnent by reason of the slotted or recessed hook of the outer needle, within which it reciprocates.

A further object'of the inventionlis to provide a. needle of this type in which the inner needle has a swelled portion projecting out from the slot of the outer needle below the point of the latter, for engagement with the cloth backing, whereby, reciprocation of the inner needle with reference tothe outer needle is automatically obtained, and whereby the outer` hook is Iclosed during the movement of the outer needlein one direction, and is opened during the movement of the needle in the opposite direction.

A further object of the invention is to provide a needle of this type, in which the entire inner needle, including its hook, with the exception of the bulged portion of the inner needle, is wholly encased within the outer needle.

Another object is to provide a needlesuch as described, in which the inner needle has its upper end pointed to form, by Contact with the inner surface of the hook of the outer needle, a stop of small area, to thereby prevent a lbinding engagement between the inner and outer needles at the upper limit of movedirection.

A still further object is to provide the inner i needle with a throat which substantially corresponds in width with that 'of the outer y needle, when the former is in thread-receivi ng position, to thereby form no obstruction or hindrance to the looping of the thread in the needle, and to incline the throats of the inner and outer needles at an angle to the lin(l oi movement of the inner needle, so that when the latter is moved to position for closing tin` throat of the outer needle, the bottom or be displaced somewhat inwardly of the corresponding wall of the throat ot' the outer needle, to thereby distribute the support ol vthe thread loop over the hook of the-inner needle as well as the side walls of the outer needle With these and other objects in view, which will become more apparent as the description proceeds, reference is made to the accom panying drawing, which discloses one of the variety of forms that the invention may take, and in which,

Figure 1 represents an end elevational viewv ot' a needle segment removed from a knitting machine, showing a needle inside elevation.

Figure 2 represents an enlarged longitudinal sectional View through the needle.

Figures 3 and -1 represent elevational views, partially in section, showing dill'erent positions in the-operation of a needle in knitting a padding onto a woven burlap backing.

Figure 5 represents a horizontal sectionall view taken on the line 5 enlarged scale.

5 of Figure 3,011 an thread-engaging wall of the inner needle will Referring more particularly to thel drawing, the main' or outer needle 5 is provided with a slot 6, wlnch extends around the hook alti 7 of the needle as at 8, and in which slot the inner needle 9 is located.

The latter is provided with a hook l10l which is located within the hook 7 of the outer needle, the point 11 of the inner hook being located within the slot which extends down the hook ofthe outer needle to near the point thereof. The point of the inner hook is thus housed in such slot against engagement with the thread as the latter is looped upon the needle and moves up into the throat thereof, the outer wall 12 of' the throat 13 of the 'inner hook forming substantially a continuation of the lower outer wall 1i of the throat of the outer hook. This arrangement appears from Figure 2, in which the parts are shown in the position assumed when the inner needle is at the lower end oi" its path of travel, the throat of the outer needle being open, and the needle as a whole, being in condition to have the thread loop passed about its hooko Figures 3 and 1 also illustrate this condition of the needle, the thread loop as it is formed about the needle, ready to be engaged in the hook of the needle as the latter descends, being indicated in Figure The throat 13 of the inner hook is substantially of the same width as the throat 15 of the outer hook, the lower or thread-engaging wall 16 of the inner hook registering with the corresponding wall 17 of the outer hook when the inner needle is in its lower position. The walls 14 and 17 of the throat of the outer needle are arranged at an angle to the longitudinal axis of the needle, which axis coincides with the path of movement of the inner needle, and hence after the loop has been engaged in the needle, and the inner needle moves upwardly, its lower wall 16 shifts slightly inwardly with reference to the walls 17 oi the throat. of the outer needle, whereby the loop of the thread A, will be supported by the wall of the throat of the inner needle, as well as by the walls of the throat of the outer needle, as indicated in Figure 5.. This forms a smooth bend in the thread, without abrupt turns, and hence not only relieves the thread from danger of weakening abrasion, but distributes the wear on the needle as a whole between the inner and'outer needles.

The inner needle is formed with a bulged portion 18, which projects beyond the edge of the outer needle below the hook of the latter, to provide shoulders at 19 and 20, the

purpose of which will more 4fully hereinafter appear. These lshoulders are preferably curved as illustrated, the edge ofthe upper shoulder merging with the lower wall of the throat of the inner needle, so as to smoothly guide the loop of the thread into the hooked portion of the needle. When theinner needle is in its upper position with reference to the outer needle, as illustrated in Figures 3 and Il, the shoulder 19 of the inner needle having traversed the width of the'throat of the outer needle, engages the point of the outer hook, to close the throat and condition theneedle to` shed the loop, illustrated at B, which has previously been formed on the needle, and to also prevent the point of` the hook from catching in the Woven backingas 'the needle descends. If desired, the shoulder 19 may be provided with a counter-sunk` depression as at 21, to receive the tip of the hook of the outer needle, to insure against the thread catching in the latter as the loop B is shed.

rl`he upper end or hooked portion of the inner` needle may be somewhat pointed as at 22. such point being adapted to engage the bottom wall of the slot 8 in the outer needle hook, to limit the upward movement of the inner needle when the throat of the outer needle has been closed, `to thus provide a stop of small area which will prevent any binding action between the inner and outer needles taking place, and which might otherwire retard the ready downward movement of the inner needle when the time for such movement arrives. If desired, the depression 21 inthe upper shoulder of the inner needle may be made sulliciently large to accommodate the point of the hook of the outer needle, and to allow such point .to abut against the bottom wall of the depression in order to form a stop for the upward movement of the inner needle, In either event a stop of relativel small area is provided, which prevents any l inding action taking place between the inner and outer needles when the latter is at the upper limit of its movement.

The inner needle is provided with a. downwardly extending reduced shank 23 which slidably fits within the walls of the slot of the outer needle, and between the base of the slot and the pin 24 which pierces the side walls of the slot. Such shank sliding between the pin'and the walls of the slot, maintains the inner needle in proper alignment during its reciprocal movements within the outer needle. At the junction of the shank 23 with the body portion of the inner needle there-above, a seat 25 is provided which preferably curves over the upper face of the pin 24, to form a stop for the lowering movement of the inner needle. Such seat being curved over the upper wall of the pin, properly centers the inner needle and prevents any binding or Wedging action taking place'between the inner needle and the base of the slot as the former approaches 'its lowermost position.

Referring more particularly to Figures 3 and 4, the Woven backing is indicated at C, and a sliver of the padding is indicated at D.' In Figure 3 the right hand needle has moved upwardly, the point 26 having pierced the backing, and a new loop of the thread A has been formed about the needle. As the latter moves downwardly in its reciprocal motion, the loop of'the thread Amovesup into the throat of the needle, and as the shoulder of the bulged portion 18 of the inner needle engages the backing C, the resistance afforded by the backing to the passage of the bulged portion of the inner needle, forces the latter upwardly, to close the throat of the outer needle, and to place the needle as a whole in a condition to' shed the loop B, occurring below the backing, and which has already been formed on the needle. This upward movement of the inner needle will'be assisted by the pull exerted on the hook of the inner needle by the loop of the thread A, as the needle moves downwardly.

Contlnumg lts downward movement, the

- needle emerges from below they backing, with l of the needle.

its throat in closed condition, the loop B slips upwardly over the bulged portion of the inner needle and over the hook of the outer needle, is shed,4and slips onto the thread A, the

loop of the latter remaining within the hook As the needle again rises, in continuing the knitting operation, it pierces the backing, and the upper shoulder 19 of the bulge of the inner needle engaging upon the under side of the backing as the needle passes therethrough, forces the inner needle downwardly, allowing the loop of the thread A to slip downwardly over the shoulder 19 and the bulge of the inner needle and onto the body of the needle to occupy the positlon formerly occupied by the loop B, as shown in Figure 3. Thus the needle moves upwardly through the backing after the bulged portion has passed therethrough, with its throat open ready to receive a new loop. rI`he doliing bars or guide plates for the material are indicated at E. t

From the foregoing, it is believed that the operation of the needle will be clearly 'understood by those skilled in the art, without further explanation. lVhile I have described the needle in connection with its usefulness in the knitting of a padding ont-o a woven backing, it will be understood that I do not intend my invention to be so limited in its use, as it may be used inmany other knitting operations. The description has been given merely for the purpose of illustrating one of the uses to which the invention may be put.

It will be noted that the inner needle, eX- cept for the bulged portion 18 thereof, is wholly enclosed within the outer needle, and there are therefore no lateral projections or extensions of any kind that might tendto |abrade the backing or fabric, if the needleis used in a knitting operation such as described, or to unnecessarily enlarge the opening made therein for the passage of the needle. Further .`the hook of the inner needle being disposed in the slot provided in the hook of the outer needle, both at the front and rear thereof. is accurately guided and held against any lateral twisting or straining movements or The outer needle may. also be economically,

stamped out of strip metal, and folded upon itself to form the channel for receiving the inner needle, and then turned over at its upper end and swaged or otherwise'treated to forni the point 26 ofthe needle and the pointed end of its hook, or it may be made out of solid stock and have its channel or slot formed therein. In either event, it is economical of manufacture.

This adds to the simplicity vof the lVhile I have thus described one of the forms that the invention may take, and'one of the uses to which it may be put, the foregoing description has been given for purposes of illustration and understanding ofthe invention only, and no limitations are to be deduced therefrom, but the claims should be' construed as broadly as permissible, in view of the prior art.

Having thus described my invention what I claim as new, and desire to secure by U. S. Letters Patent is 1. In a knitting needle, the combination of an outer needle having a hook portion, said outer needle being provided with a Slot extending around the inner side of the hook portion to adjacent the point thereof, and an inner needle slidably mounted in the slot of the outer needle and having a hook located within the hook portion of the outer needle, the edges ofthe hook of vthe inner needle extending into the slot of the outer needle at tige front and back of the hook portion thereo 2. In a knitting needle,the combination of an outer needle having a hook portion and being provided with a slot extending around the inner sides of the hook, and an Vinner needle slidably mounted in the slot of the outer needle and provided with a hook, the edges of which are located in the slotted hook of the outer needle.

3. In a knitting needle, the combination of an outer needle having a hook portion and being provided with a slot extending around the inner walls of the hook, and-an inner needle slidably mounted-in the slot and prof vided with a hook, the edges of which extend into `the slotted `hook of the outer needle, the edges of the throat of the outer needle hook being inclined to the direction of travel of thev inner needle, and the thread-engaging wall of the inner needle hook being similarly an outei needle having ahook portion, and `being provided with a slot which extends around the inner sides of the hook portion, and an inner needle slidably mounted in the slot of the outer needle and having a hook portion located Within the hook of the outer needle and extending at'its edges into the slot thereof, said inner needle being provided with a bulged portion extending beyond one edge of the outer needle, the inner needle except at itsbulged portion, being Wholly mounted in the slotted portions of theouter needle. 5. In a knitting needle, the combination of an outer needle having a hook portion and being provided with a slot which extends aroundpthe inner sides of the hook portion, and an inner needle slidably mounted in the slot of the outer needle and includin a hook portion encased within the hook of t e outer needle, said inner needle having a bulged portion extending beyond one edge of the outer needle.

6. In a knitting needle, the combination of an outer needle having a hook portion, and being provided with a slot extending around the hook portion thereof, an inner needle mounted for reeiproeation in the slot and includinO a hook portion encased Within the slot of thelliook portion of the outer needle, said. inner needle being provided with a bulge extending beyond one edge of the outer needle and being provided with a redueed shank enclosed between the Walls of th'evslot, and a pin carried by the outer needle and between which and the Walls of the slot, said shank is guided, there being a seat arranged at the unction of the said reduced shank andthe ulge of the inner needle and adapted to engage said pin for limiting the movement of the inner needle in one direction.

7. In a knitting needle, the combination of an outer needle having a hook portion and being -provided with a slot extending around the inner Walls of the hook portion, an inner needle slidably mounted Within the slot of the outer needle and including a hook portion extending at its edges into the slot in the hook portion of the outer needle, the hook portion of the inner needle being provided With a tapering point adapted to engage a wall of the slot of the outer needle to limit the movement of the inner needle in one direction.

In testimony whereof I hereunto ailix my signature.

MARTIN LUTHER PLEDGER.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2498499 *Nov 5, 1947Feb 21, 1950Pittsburgh Waterproof CompanyPad for ironer rolls
US3030786 *Oct 20, 1958Apr 24, 1962Tullmaschb VebTextile material and manufacture
US3229485 *May 1, 1962Jan 18, 1966Vyzk Ustav BavlnarskySliding latch needle
US3230917 *Dec 3, 1962Jan 25, 1966Kintslaid Engineering CompanyMethod of forming a pile fabric
US4196600 *Jul 13, 1978Apr 8, 1980Karl Mayer Textilmaschinenfabrik GmbhSlider needles for warp knitting machines
Classifications
U.S. Classification66/120, 66/85.00R, 66/85.00A
International ClassificationD04B35/00, D04B35/06
Cooperative ClassificationD04B35/06
European ClassificationD04B35/06