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Publication numberUS1868100 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 19, 1932
Filing dateJan 19, 1929
Priority dateJan 19, 1929
Publication numberUS 1868100 A, US 1868100A, US-A-1868100, US1868100 A, US1868100A
InventorsCharles B Goodstein
Original AssigneeBella Goodstein
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Staple and method of driving the same
US 1868100 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

July 19, 1932. c. B. GOODSTEIN STAPLE AND METHOD OF DRIVING THE SAME Filed Jan. 19. 1929 BY M ATTORNEY WIFIIIEII 1 wmyw Patented July 19, 1932 1 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE f CIEABLES B. GOODSTEIN, OF BROOKLYN, NEW YORK, ASSIGNOR I OF NEW YORK, N. Y.

srarLE AND METHOD or DRIVING 'rnn sum.

Application filed January 19, 1928. Serial R'o. 838,701.

' My invention relates to staples for secur- 'i'ng together sheets of paper, cardboard, fab.-

rics and various other materials, and to a novel method of driving the staples. Sta-' 5 ples have been widely used for securing papers together. and also for securing various other kinds of materials and there are various machines on the'market for driving and applying staples. As far as I am aware such 0 machines are-divided into two general classes, those of. one class having, in addition to the means for driving the staples, a lower member or anvil'with which the driving. plunger cooperates, the anvil serving to turn or clench the staples after they have passed through the material which is being stapled. Another class of machine is that in which the driving means is employed without a base or anvil, in which case the staples have been driven straight into the inaterial'a'nd have not been clenched. This type of machine, commonly called a tag machine, is generally used for tacking tags onto boxes, ireight cars, etc., for

tacking curtain materials onto the curtain rollers and in various-other uses where'the staple does not have to be clenched. With the first ty e of machine it is not possible to apply stap es to a closed box because it is not possible to get the anvil inside the box to complete the clenching operation. In the second type of machine, or tag machine, there 'is no part used for clenching the staple.

The object of my invention is to provide a .staple and to provide a method of drivin the same which will permit staples to be driven through material from one side only and to cause the staple to clench after assing through the material. By employm the present invention it is possible to sta e to-' 40 ether the flaps or the cover and body o boxes ymeans of a devlce which will operate en-' ti-rely from the outside of the box. It is,

therefore, possible to staple flaps or other.

portions of the box after the latter has been 415 closed, becausethe clenching of the staple is To BELLA ooonsra my accomplished without any anvil or other instrumentality on the interior of the box. As far as I am aware, this is the first instance Where staples, have been driven through material and clenched by operations carried on from .one side only o'fthe material which isstapled. The staple forming the subject of my invention is so'formed that when it is driven under the control-of devices on one side i of the material the prongs of'the staple are compelled to not only pass through the material being stapled, but to bend in such man- In addicause thesta le cannotbe removed from a container'wit out showing marks indicating that the package has beentampered with.

Once the staple has been applied, that is,

driven through the material andclenched' on a closed. container, access cannot be had to the interior of the container to unclench the sta le. l

he only wa the staple can be removed is by forcibly pu ling it out of the material of the container and this will partially destroy the material and show that the package-has been tampered with.

In the drawing forming part of this applicatio n,.

Figure 1 is a vertical, sectional view showing the tools employed in. driving staples in accordance with the present invention,

Figure 2 is a perspective view of a portionof a strip of staples embodying my invention,

Flgure .3 is a verticahsectional view showing the staple in position to be driven with the toolsapplied and ready for the commencement of the driving operation.

Figure 4 is a similar view showin the staple driven through the material an under oing the clenching operation,

igure 5 is a. similar view showing the staple at the completion of the clenching operation,

Figure plied and the tools withdrawn,

Fi ure 7 is a perspective view of a modified Orin of staple strip embodying my invention,

Fi ure 8 is a view similar to Figure 3 but showing the staple ready to be driven withut the member for supporting the center of the staple,

Fi ure 9 is a view similar to Figure 8 but showing the staple completely driven, and

Figure 10 is a sectional view through a container showing the staple applied.

I will first describe the form, of my in vention shown in Figures 1 to 6 inclusive.

In this form of the invention I have shown the staples formed of sheet material and arranged in close parallel relation to constitute a strip from which the individual staples may be removedas they are driven. The individual staples in this strip may be held together by any of the means now employed for holding staples in strip form in connec tion with the plain staples in general use; that is, by applying a coating of enamel or similar material which will secure the individual staples together at their edges with suflieient tenacity to enable the staples to be handled as a strip until they are driven.

Each stapleconsists of a preferably fiat plane central portion-1 from which extends upwardly at each side an arched orcircular portion 2, these circular portions being adapted to form the pron s or legs of the sta le. ee endsof these are ed to form pointed. ends for piercing the material. Preferably' thesepointed ends terminate about in thesaine horizontal plane as the lower surface of the middle portionsv 1 of the staples. v a

In driving this form of staple the tools shown in Figures 1 to 6 inclusive, may be used. These consist of a vertically moving plunger 4 which serves toedrive the staples and this plunger reciprocates in the bore of a sleeve 5. There is a. small member 6 which forms a temporary support or anvil under the middle portion 1 of the staple and this member is movable laterally as it is to be withdrawn from the staple before the clenching operation has been completed. Where the material to be'stapled has a hard surface into whichthe central portion of the staple will not sink too far, the anvil member 6 may be omitted so that the T central portion of the 6 shows the staple completely ap-.

stapled.

The staple strip is fed onto the anvil member 6 as shown in Figure 3 by any suitable feeding mechanism, such as is commonly used in stapling ma hines, so that the fiat, intermediate portion 1 of the sta le rests on thetop surface of the anvil niem er 6 above the material which is to be stapled.

In Figures 3 to 6 I have shown two sheets 7, 8 of cardboard or corrugated board lying face to face, and these may be stapled together by operations carried on from one side of the sheets. These sheets may be overlapping flaps of a box, as shown in l igure- 10, which could not otherwise be stapled because n prevlous practice an anvil had to be used on opposite sides of the sheets to the plunger. Assuming that the staple has been ed onto the support 6, as shown in Figure 3, the arched portions 9 of the staple project at 7 each side and rest against or near the inner surface of the sleeve 5 which is in reality a die member. The plunger 4 which lies above the staple is now moved downwardly inorder to press downwardly on the upper portions 9 of the arched prongs. As this pressure is' applied b the plunger, the staple has a tendency to e flattened as the plunger presses on the top of the arches 9. The central portion of the staple cannot descend be cause it rests on the support 6. The free ends of the prongs of the staple cannot spread because they are confined by the die member 5 in which they are enclosed. As the plunger goes down, therefore, as shown in Figure 4, the prongs of the staple under the action of the plunger and under the cooperating action of the die member 5 first pierce the sheets 7, 8 of the corrugated board,

and then continue in a circular direction, so that the rongs, after passing through the sheets of? corru ated board, move toward each other, as shown in Fi re 4. About this time andbefore the top of the staple,

that is, the portion remaining on the outside surface of the corrugated boards, becomes fully flattened, the'member 6 is withdrawn laterally.

The plunger continues its downward mo- 2 tion, as shown in Figure 5, sothat theportion of the staple 10 above, the corrugated board is finally flattened against the latter the operations of driving the staplethrough the corrugated boards and of, turning or clenching the prongs inside the same arev carried out by operations performed entirely on one surface of the material which is'stapled.

off the strip leavin or the flange and the body of a box, the oper-' ,erformed ations above described may be after the box or carton has been lled with the contents and closed. Theshape of the staples, together with the tools employed, cause the prongs to pierce the material which is being stapled and to clenoh without the use of an anvil on the opposite side of the material to that of the p unger. I

In Figures 7, 8 and 9 I have shown the staple strip somewhat modified, so that the under support 6 referred to in the previous description need not .be placed as previously described, In this 'form the staples are formed as a strip with a continuous connecting piece or back member 11 similar to Staple strips heretofore in use. The prongs 12 in this case, however,'are' arched, the same as in the first form, and have their ends 13- pointed, but there is aspace between each pair of prongs indicated as slots 14 in Figure 7, so that an individual staple maybe out ples connected by t e longitudinal member 11. v

In this case the intermediate portion or rib. 11- of the staple will be supported on a bar similar to the manner in which the staplesare fed in the present types of machines except that where the-member 6 remains un-.

der the central portion of the staple until the latter is partly driven, this member will only 9. Inother words, the o with those first descri V so support the staple strip, leaving the end staple which is to be driven projecting beyond the support. In this case the staple will be driven by the lunger 4 and the die. member 5 the same as efore'but the central portion of the staple will be supported while thepron s are being driven throu hthe corrugate' board, by the 'backemem er orrib 11 until the pron have been driven through the corrugatedfioard and the clenching operation has been partially completed, so that theportionll of the strip' 'ust behind the endmost staple will be cut 0 just before the staple reaches the condition "shown in Figure rations correspond d except that the temporary support 6 does not project under the staple which is being driven but only under t e rib lljust behind this staple. The invention, as far as the product is concerned, consists of the staple or strip of staples having an intermediate portion on each side of which is an arched prong, the prongs being adaptedto be bent downwardly toward the plane of the central portion so that the prongs aresimultaneousiy passed through the material to'be stapled and are clenched on the inner side. In so far as the method is concerned, it consists of driving a staple through the material by operations per-- formed entirely onone side of the material for the purpose of causing the prongs of all the remaining stathe staple to pierce the material and clenoh on the reverse side.

Having described my invention, what I claim is: v

1. A method of driving staples, consisting of applying pressure to a staple having arched prongs to flatten a portion thereof on one side of the material and confining the lateral positions of vsaid prongs to cause them to pierce the material to be stapled and to clench on the under side thereof, said several x operations being performed exclusively from a portion thereof on one side of the material and to cause the'prongs to pass through the material bein stapled, and laterally guiding the prongs o the staple from the same side of the material that the driving force is applied, to cause the prongs of the staples to clenoh as they pass throughthe material.-

3. A method of driving staples consist ing of applying pressure to a staple having arched prongs, said pressure being appliedin a direction toward the mater al to be stapled and simultaneously providing abutments to preventthe lateral spreading of the prongs of the staple while said pressure-is eing applied, to cause the .prongs of the u staple to pierce the material and to'clench on the opposite side thereof while that portion of the staple to which pressure is being applied is being straightened against the material, said several operations being per-m formed on one side of the material which is being stapled. Y 1

4. A method of driving staples which are formed with an intermediate portion and with prongs extending atxarched shape from the opposite sides of said intermediate portion, which method consists of applying pressure to the arched prongs of said staple, simultaneously supporting the under side of said intermediate portion of the staple, said pressure being applied in a direction toward the material to be stapled, and simultaneous-' ly providing abutments'to revent the lateral spreading of the prongs w le said pressure is being applied, tocausethe prongs of the staple to pierce the material and to clenoh on the o posite side thereof, said several oper v ations. eing performed all on one side of thematerial which is being stapled.v

5. A method of driving staples, consisting of applying a staple to a member to be pierced thereby, said staple havin prongs extending upwardly from the mi dle portionof the staple and thence downwardly in arcuate shape, and applying pressure to the prongs. of the staple to flatten portions thereof against one side of'the materialbeing stapled, causing the prongs to 'pierce the materialand'the arc uate portions of the prongs to pass into the material in arcuate paths by reason of the said straightening action of portions of the prongs, whereby said prongs will clench automatically when 5 driven, sald operations being performed exclusively from that side'of the material from which the-prongs enter the same. 7 Signed at the city, county, and State of 0 New Yorkthis 7th day of January 1929.

1 a CHARLES B. eoons'rnm.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2912732 *Dec 9, 1954Nov 17, 1959Curt MatthaeiWire hook connecting conveyer bands, belts, and the like
US3077812 *Dec 29, 1958Feb 19, 1963Josef KihlbergStaple
US3218700 *Jan 20, 1964Nov 23, 1965Elastic Ag Vorm M Vogel A GStaple and method of and apparatus for applying it
US4014492 *Jun 11, 1975Mar 29, 1977Senco Products, Inc.Surgical staple
US4589416 *Apr 11, 1985May 20, 1986United States Surgical CorporationSurgical fastener retainer member assembly
US5976290 *Oct 14, 1997Nov 2, 1999Orcon CorporationApparatus and method for seaming carpets
US8668718Jun 4, 2010Mar 11, 2014Rotation Medical, Inc.Methods and apparatus for fixing sheet-like materials to a target tissue
US8763878Jun 4, 2010Jul 1, 2014Rotation Medical, Inc.Methods and apparatus having bowstring-like staple delivery to a target tissue
US8821536Jun 4, 2010Sep 2, 2014Rotation Medical, Inc.Methods and apparatus for delivering staples to a target tissue
US8821537May 8, 2013Sep 2, 2014Rotation Medical, Inc.Methods and apparatus for fixing sheet-like materials to a target tissue
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Classifications
U.S. Classification29/432.1, 411/920, 16/16, 411/457, 29/505, 411/461
International ClassificationB25C5/16, A61B17/10
Cooperative ClassificationY10S411/92, B25C5/16, A61B17/10
European ClassificationA61B17/10, B25C5/16