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Publication numberUS1869864 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 2, 1932
Filing dateMay 23, 1930
Priority dateMay 23, 1930
Publication numberUS 1869864 A, US 1869864A, US-A-1869864, US1869864 A, US1869864A
InventorsPhillips Arthur B
Original AssigneePhillips Arthur B
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Tessellate puzzle
US 1869864 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

2, 1932- A. B. PHILLIPS 1,869,864

TESSELLATE PUZZLE Filed May 25, 1950 Z Sheets-Sheet l Hi III IN VEN TOR.

2. ATTORNEY g- 1932- A. B. PHILLIPS 1,869,864

TESSELLATE PUZZLE Filed May as, 1950 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 %,7V .2. ATTORNEY Patented Aug. 2, 1932 ARTHUR B. rrrrnri'rrsor LYNIBROOK, NEW roan TESSELLATE rozzrin Application filed May 23', 1930. Serial No. 454,849;

This invention has for its object to-provide a novel amusement or game means in the form of a puzzle, comprising a plurality of tile-like pieces of varioussizes, the surfaces of which are divided into squares, and cer; tain of which pieces have a square of. contrasting color. The tile-like pieces thus provided are capable ofbeing assembled to gether in geometrical form, and the object of the game or puzzle is to so assemble the pieces that no colored squares are aligned, in the finished; geometrical form of the assembly, either horizontally, vertically or di-ago lially. 1

- With the object of this inventionin view,

the same consists in a number'of tile-like pieces of various sizes, each containing on its surface one or more squares, according to the size thereof, and certain of the pieces con taining a square of contrasting color; whereby the pieces may be interfitted to-- gether, to form in assembled relation; atessellate pattern in which the colored squares are so placed that only a single colored square 25 is located in any one horizontal, vertical or diagonal row of squares.

' The pieces may vary in number according to the number of squares to be contained in the finished tessellate pattern. Illustrative of the principles of the game or puzzle, the accompanying drawings show one embodiment of the inventionv in which the number and arrangement of pieces is such that a has sellate pattern containing one hundred squares as a maximum is provided. c

In said drawings, Figure 1 is a plan view showing the group of pieces having-their surfaces divided into squares, one of which is a square of contrasting color, and Figure 2 is a plan view of the group of pieces having their surfaces divided into squares with none of the chosen contrasting color..

Figure 3 is a plan view illustrating the manner of initiating the assembly ofpieces to produce the desired tessellate pattern Figure 4 being aplan view of such initialassem-. bly as completed. g 7

Figures 5 to 10 inclusive are respectively plan views showing the manner ofprogressively building up the assembly of pieces until a tessellatepattern containing the maximum number of squares; in desired arrangement is attained, the heavy lines in these, views indicating the lines of separation between indi vidual pieces or tiles.;' v 7 V 1 Similar characterseofreference are em-- ployed in the above described viewsto indie cate corresponding parts. i

When providing the game or puzzlefor the production of a tessellate pattern containing one hundred squaresas a maximum, the full set of pieces or tiles preferably com prises a group A providing ten piecesor tiles of various sizes, as-shown in Eigure 1, designated respectively by the reference numerals 11, 12, 1,3, 14:, 15, 16, 17,18, 19 and 2 0,. and, a group B providing pieces or tiles of various sizes, as shown in Figure 2, tiles of respective sizes in this group being designated by the reference numerals 21, 22, 23, 21 and 2 5.

In group A, the respective pieces or tiles vary in length as 'follfows: v H The piece or tile 11, is of alength whereby itssurfaceis divided intoa row of ten squares, an end square 11 being of a color contrasting with that of the. other squares,e. .g. nine squares'being white and said endsquare 11 black; and in like manner,;the, piece or tile 12 possesses nine squares, eight white and ablack end square 12, the piece or tile 13 possesses eight squares,.seven white and a black end square 13"; the piece or tile 14, possesses seven squares, six white anda black end square 1a; the piece. or tile 15 possesses six squares,

five white and a black end square 15; the 1 piece 'or' tile 16 possesses five squares, four white and a black endsquare 16; the piece or tile 17 possesses four squares, three white and av black; end square, 17 the piece or tile 18 possesses three squares, two white and a black end square '18 the piece or tile 19 pos-.

sessestwo squares, one white and afblac ksquare 19' and the piece or tile .20 forms a singleflblack square. 7 I

Ingroup B, the respective'p'ieces ortiles also. vary in length as follows .A piece 21 isof a length whereby its surface .is divided into a row of live white squares; four pieces 22 areeach of afllength whereby their surfaces are divided into a row of four white squares; four pieces 23 are each of a length whereby their surfaces are divided into a row of three white squares; four pieces 2& are each of a length whereby their surfaces are divided into two white squares; and four pieces 25, each forming a single white square.

With the pieces or tiles thus provided, the problem or puzzle for solution is to so group or assemble the pieces or tiles into square geometric form in which the small black and white squares on the faces of the pieces or tiles are so related that not more than one black square appears in any single row of squares running either vertically, horizontally or diagonally (i. e. taken along a line passing through diagonal corners of a black square) in the finished mosaic pattern provided thereby in the complete assembly.

The problem or puzzle thus provided requires the exercise of no little ingenuity and study in the solving thereof, and therefore affords considerable interest and entertainment. In its solution an initial geometric form C containing sixteen surface squares is the minimum size assembly which can be produced under the requirements of the puzzle. This form may be increased in size by adding pieces or tiles to produce gradually enlarged forms D, E, F, G, H and I until a'maxlmum size assembly of one hundred surface squares is reached, when employing the set of pieces or tiles containing the members shown in groups A and B of Figures 1 and 2. It will be obvious, however, that the maximum number of pieces may be less or more than shown in groups A and B, should it be desired to decrease or increase the maximum s1ze of finished geometric form on assembly attainable therewith. 1

An examination of Figures 5 to 10 inclusive will clearly show how the pieces or tiles may be added to the minimum or initial form C so as to produce larger and larger geometric forms or asselnb-lles until the form or assembly of given maximum size is attained.

While I have shown the individual pieces or tiles all of rectangular form, it is not essential, in the broader aspects of my invention, that the same all be restricted to such form, since, if desired, certain of the same may be of irregular form. I have also shown in group B'four single white square pieces, these may, if desired, be combined so as to provide two square pieces or tiles, such as the pieces 24, in place thereof.

The arrangement of pieces or tiles as shown in groups A and B is preferable, however, since it permits, the further statement in aid of the solution of the puzzle, thatall pieces or tiles of group A will be disposed vertically, while all pieces or tiles of group B will be disposed horizontally, in the finished form orassembly, when the same is properly made up.

It will be obvious that modifications other than those above specified, may be made within the spirit of this invention as defined in the appended claims, hence the showing of the drawings and the description contained in the above specification are desired to be considered as illustrative and not in a limiting sense.

Having thus described my invention, I claim 1. A puzzle, comprising a plurality of pieces having their surfaces patterned in squares, certain of said pieces containing in their square patterned surfaces squares of contrasting color, said pieces being capable of fitting together to produce a finished geometrical form of tessellate appearance in which no squares ofthe contrasting color are aligned either horizontally, vertically or diagonally as taken along lines passing through diagonal corners of said squares of the contrasting color.

2. A puzzle, comprising a plurality of pieces of various lengths having their surfaces patterned in squares, certain of said pieces having squares of all one color, and other of said pieces having squares of the same and a contrasting color, said pieces being capable of fitting together to produce a finished geometrical form of tessellate appearance in which no squares of the contrasting color are aligned either horizontally, vertically or diagonally as taken along lines passing through diagonal corners of said squares of the contrasting color.

3. A puzzle, comprising a plurality of pieces having their surfaces patterned in squares, certain of said pieces containing one square of contrasting color, said pieces being capable of fitting together to form a finished tessellate mosaic in which no single vertical, horizontal or diagonal row of squares contains more than one square of contrasting color, each diagonal row of squares being interpreted as consisting of those squares that are bisected by a straight diagonal line passing through diagonal corners of all of the squares of the row.

4c. A puzzle, comprising a plurality of pieces having their surfaces patterned to form one or more aligned squares, certain of said pieces having a single square of contrasting color, said pieces being capable of fitting together to form a finished tessellate mosaic in which no single vertical, horizontal or diagonal row of squares contains more than one square of contrasting color, each diagonal row of squares being interpreted as consisting of those squares that are bisected by a straight diagonal line passing through diagonal corners of all of the squares of the row.

5. A puzzle, comprising a plurality of pieces of various sizes having a surface pattern of geometrical figures, certain of said pieces having a contrasting pattern figure, said pieces being capable of fitting together to form a plurality of finished assemblies containing horizontal, vertical and diagonal 2'' rows of pattern figures, no one of said rows containing more than one contrasting pattern figure, each diagonal roW of squares being interpreted as consisting of those squares that are bisected by a straight diagonal line pass- :ic ing through diagonal corners of all of the squares of the row.

6. A puzzle, comprising a plurality of rectangular pieces having their surfaces respectively patterned to form one or more aligned pattern figures, certain of said pieces having a single contrasting pattern figure at an end thereof, and said pieces being capable of fitting together to form a plurality of finished assemblies containing horizontal, vertical and diagonal rows of pattern figures, no one of said rows containing more than one contrasting pattern figure, each diagonal row of squares being interpreted as consisting of those squares that are'bisected by a straight diagonal line passing through diagonal corners of all of the squares of the row.

7. A puzzle, comprising a plurality of rectangular pieces ofv various lengths having their surfaces patterned to provide one or 39 more squares lengthwise thereof, certain of said pieces having a single pattern square of contrasting color at the ends thereof, and said pieces being capable of fitting together to form a member of finished tessellate mosaics of varying sizes in which no single vertical, horizontal or diagonal row of squares contains more than one square of contrasting color, each diagonal row of squares being interpreted as consisting of those squares that [in are bisected by a straight diagonal line passing through diagonal corners of all of the squares of the row. I

In testimony, that I claim the inventionset forth above I have hereunto set my hand this 21 day of Mam-1930. I

ARTHUR B. PHILLIPS.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3592474 *Mar 18, 1970Jul 13, 1971James R O NeilPuzzle
US4568082 *Nov 1, 1984Feb 4, 1986Musolino Nick JBoard game
US8099919Nov 19, 2010Jan 24, 2012Faus GroupFlooring system having microbevels
US8112958Feb 27, 2003Feb 14, 2012Faus GroupFlooring system having complementary sub-panels
US8181407Oct 21, 2003May 22, 2012Faus GroupFlooring system having sub-panels
US8201377Nov 5, 2004Jun 19, 2012Faus Group, Inc.Flooring system having multiple alignment points
US8209928Jan 28, 2003Jul 3, 2012Faus GroupEmbossed-in-registration flooring system
US8448400Nov 19, 2010May 28, 2013Faus GroupFlooring system having complementary sub-panels
Classifications
U.S. Classification273/157.00R
International ClassificationA63F9/10, A63F9/06
Cooperative ClassificationA63F9/10
European ClassificationA63F9/10