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Publication numberUS1870065 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 2, 1932
Filing dateJan 17, 1931
Priority dateJan 17, 1931
Publication numberUS 1870065 A, US 1870065A, US-A-1870065, US1870065 A, US1870065A
InventorsNusser Michael W
Original AssigneeNusser Michael W
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Heel construction
US 1870065 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

A g- 1932- M. w. NUSSER 1,870,065 I HEEL CONSTRUCTION Filed Jan. 17, 1931 v F 7 a 3 M la /0 I N V EN TOR. fli'c/mxl 44/661571 Patented Aug. 2, 1932 UNITED STATES MICHAEL W. NUSSER, OF DETROIT, MICHIGAN HEEL CON STRUCTION Application filed January 17, 1931. Serial No. 509,417.

My invention relates to a new and useful improvement in a heel construction adapted for use. on shoes to which are attached separable heels preferably of a resilient type and formed from yieldable material such as rubber or the like.

It is an object of the present invention to provide a heel construction of this type wherein the yieldability of the heel may be i considerably increased and the cushion effect thereof materially enhanced.

It is another object of the invention to provide a heel construction in which the heel is provided with an easily flexible portion engageable with a yieldable thrust member to provide ease in walking and relieve the wearer of a maximum amount of the shock arising from the heel striking the ground.

Other objects will appear hereinafter.

The invention consists in the combination and arran ement of parts hereinafter described an claimed.

The invention will be best understood by a reference to the accompanying drawing which forms a part of this specification, and

in which,

Fig. 1 is a central vertical sectional view of the invention showing it attached to a shoe, and

Fig. 2 is a central vertical sectional view of the invention showing the heel or tread member detached from the shoe, and

Fig. 3 is a sectional view taken on line 3-3 of Fig. 1, slightly reduced in size.

In the drawing I have illustrated a shoe portion 7 having the nailing strip 8 to which the heel or tread portion 9 is secured by suitable nails 10-.

Secured to the attachment portion 8 by means of tacks or nails 11 is a metallic plate 12 having tongues 13 punched therefrom and bent over one end of a coil spring 14. The opposite end of the spring 14 is secured by the bent over tongues 15 to the metallic disc or plate 16 having an opening 17 formed centrally therein. The periphery of this late or disc 17 is curved inwardly to provide the head 18.

The heel or tread member 9 is provided with a central pocket or recess 19 extending centrally of which is the post or boss 20 over which the disc 16 is adapted to slide, the opening 17 being sufficiently large to permit a free sliding of the disc 16 on the post or boss 20. As shown, there is a clearance in the .55 pocket or recess 19 around the periphery of the head 18. By forming the pocket or recess 19, the tread member of the heel 9 is provided at the pocket with the thin tread portion 21 which by the pressure of the spring 14 is normally flexed outwardly as shown in the drawing. When the pressure is placed upon the heel, the portion 21 will flex inwardly against the compression of the spring 14 thus affording at the central portion of the heel a cushion or highly yieldable contact portion which first engages the floor or ground over which a person is walking and serves to absorb the initial shock incident to the placing of the foot upon the ground 01 floor. When the portion 21. is flexed inwardly so as to lie flush with the remainder of the heel, or tread member 9, the remainder of the heel will, of course, serve its function as a supporting body, but the weight and pros sure on this remaining portion will be transmitted thereto gradually because of the centrally positioned cushion arrangement described. In this way, the advantages sought may be obtained and ease in walking provided. Should the portion 21 become worn through, the cushion effect will still remain as the cushion 14 will serve to provide the yieldable resistance and the disc 16 will become the contacting member.

It is believed obvious that when it is desired to remove the heel and replace it with another, the plate 12 together with the spring 14 and the disc 16 will be left attached to the Lao attachment portion 8, the tread member or heel 9 being provided with the pocket or recess 19 and the post 20 when fabricated.

While I have illustrated and described the preferred form of construction of my invention, I do not wish to limit myself to the precise details of structure shown, but desire to avail myself of such variations and modifications as may come within the scope of the appended claims.

Having thus described my invention, what I claim as new and desire to secure by Letters Patent is:

1. A heel construction of the class described, adapted for attachment to a shoe having an attachment portion, comprising: a tread member attachable to said attachment portion and having on its inner face a centrally located pocket; a boss extending upwardly from the base of said pocket centrally thereof and terminating below said face; and yieldable means positioned in said pocket in embracing relation to said boss and engaging at one end the base of said pocket, and at the opposite end, said attachment portion for resisting inward pressure on the central portion of said tread member.

2. A heel construction of the class described, adapted for attachment to a shoe having an attachment portion, comprising: a tread member attachable to said attachment portion and having a pocket formed centrally on its inner face; a boss projecting centrally outwardly from the base of said pocket and terminating below said face; a plate secured to said attachment portion; a yieldable resisting member carried by said plate and projecting inwardly of said pocket in embracing relation to said boss and engageable with the base of said pocket for resisting inward movement thereof.

3. A heel construction of the class described, adapted for attachment to a shoe having an attachment portion, comprising: a tread member attachable to said attachment portion and having a pocket formed centrally on its inner face; a boss projecting centrally outwardly from the base of said pocket and terminating below said face; a plate secured to said attachment portion; a yieldable resisting member carried by said plate and projecting inwardly of said pocket in embracing relation to said boss and engageable with the base of said pocket for resisting inward movement thereof; and a plate secured to said resisting member and positioned in said pocket, the edges of said plate being curved inwardly to provide a bead.

In testimony whereof I have signed the foregoing specification.

MICHAEL WV. NUSSER.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2437227 *Mar 5, 1947Mar 2, 1948Manville HallCushioned shoe sole
US2441039 *Nov 8, 1946May 4, 1948Smith Herbert HSpring heel for footwear
US2454951 *Jul 21, 1947Nov 30, 1948Smith Herbert HSpring heel for footwear
US4187620 *Jun 15, 1978Feb 12, 1980Selner Allen JBiomechanical shoe
US5343639 *Oct 18, 1993Sep 6, 1994Nike, Inc.Shoe with an improved midsole
US5353523 *Oct 13, 1993Oct 11, 1994Nike, Inc.Shoe with an improved midsole
US5768802 *Oct 27, 1995Jun 23, 1998Vibram S.P.A.One-piece sports sole-heel unit with increased stability
US6487796Jan 2, 2001Dec 3, 2002Nike, Inc.Footwear with lateral stabilizing sole
US6880267Jan 28, 2004Apr 19, 2005Nike, Inc.Article of footwear having a sole structure with adjustable characteristics
US6898870Mar 20, 2002May 31, 2005Nike, Inc.Footwear sole having support elements with compressible apertures
US6964120Nov 2, 2001Nov 15, 2005Nike, Inc.Footwear midsole with compressible element in lateral heel area
US6968636Apr 26, 2004Nov 29, 2005Nike, Inc.Footwear sole with a stiffness adjustment mechanism
US7055264 *Jul 25, 2002Jun 6, 2006Gallegos Alvaro ZVentilating footwear and method of ventilating footwear
US7082698Jan 8, 2003Aug 1, 2006Nike, Inc.Article of footwear having a sole structure with adjustable characteristics
US7401418Aug 17, 2005Jul 22, 2008Nike, Inc.Article of footwear having midsole with support pillars and method of manufacturing same
US7493708Feb 18, 2005Feb 24, 2009Nike, Inc.Article of footwear with plate dividing a support column
US7533477Oct 3, 2005May 19, 2009Nike, Inc.Article of footwear with a sole structure having fluid-filled support elements
US7748141May 18, 2006Jul 6, 2010Nike, IncArticle of footwear with support assemblies having elastomeric support columns
US7774955Apr 17, 2009Aug 17, 2010Nike, Inc.Article of footwear with a sole structure having fluid-filled support elements
US7810256Apr 17, 2009Oct 12, 2010Nike, Inc.Article of footwear with a sole structure having fluid-filled support elements
US7841105Dec 7, 2009Nov 30, 2010Nike, Inc.Article of footwear having midsole with support pillars and method of manufacturing same
US8302234Apr 17, 2009Nov 6, 2012Nike, Inc.Article of footwear with a sole structure having fluid-filled support elements
US8302328Jun 29, 2010Nov 6, 2012Nike, Inc.Article of footwear with a sole structure having fluid-filled support elements
US8312643Sep 28, 2010Nov 20, 2012Nike, Inc.Article of footwear with a sole structure having fluid-filled support elements
US8656608Sep 13, 2012Feb 25, 2014Nike, Inc.Article of footwear with a sole structure having fluid-filled support elements
Classifications
U.S. Classification36/38
International ClassificationA43B21/00, A43B21/30
Cooperative ClassificationA43B21/30
European ClassificationA43B21/30