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Publication numberUS1870114 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 2, 1932
Filing dateAug 12, 1931
Priority dateAug 12, 1931
Publication numberUS 1870114 A, US 1870114A, US-A-1870114, US1870114 A, US1870114A
InventorsHeller Edwin H
Original AssigneeHeller Edwin H
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Shoe ventilating device
US 1870114 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Aug. 2, 1932. E; H. HELLER 73 9 SHOE VENTILATING DEVICE Filed Aug. 12, 1931 0 0 0 oooooo 0 o 0000aooooecao 000000 dz/H1 7 Heller INVENTOF! Md 6a AMEN Patented" Aug.- 2,' 1932 EDWIN H. HELLER, OF .SIKESTON, MISSOURI SHOE VENTILA'IING DEVICE Application filed August 12, 1931.

My present invention has reference to a new and novel construction of shoes, and my object is the provision of a shoe having an insole or inner sole construction of such character as to afford elasticity to the foot of the wearer and likewise force continuous blasts of air against the wearers foot as long as he is walking.

To the attainment of the foregoing the invention consists in the improvement hereinafter described and definitely claimed.

In the drawing:

Figure 1 is a side elevation of the improvement, with parts in section of a shoe constructed in accordance with this invention.

Figure 2 is a plan view of the inner sole.

Figure 3 is aplan view of the main sole with the inner sole or lining removed.

Figure l is a detailed perspective view looking toward the rear of the metal heel plate.

The shoe is indicated in the drawing by the numeral 1, the main sole by the numeral 2 and the heel by the numeral 3. The outer edges of the main sole 2 have stitched on the edges and ends thereof a continuous leather strip 4. Thus the main sole 2 has its top formed with a depression which afiords an air chamber or pocket. The upper of the shoe is stitched to the leather strip or flange 4: and received in the air pocket in the main sole 2 and secured therein in any desired or preferred manner there is a leather sheet or strip 5. The portion of this sheet extending beyond the arch of the shoe and over the sole proper is centrally slitted or divided to receive therein a thin metal plate 6. By slitting the sheet, at the sole portion thereof, and arranging the metal plate 6 therein the coiled expansion springs (hereinafter to be described) Will embed themselves in the upper slitted portion of the i sheet 5 and will thereby be held properly positioned.

The insole 8 rests on the flange 4 and is stitched thereto, as at 8. of leather and as disclosed by the drawing has both its body or sole portion as well as its heel portion provided with series of both longitudinally and transversely arranged apertures 9 that afford air passages. For distinction the sole portion of the inner sole is indicated by the numeral 10, the arch by The inner sole is Serial No. 556,671.

said springs bear against the upper face of the split sole portion of the leather member 5, and exerting pressure against'the metal reinforcing plate therein. This, as previously stated, will hold the springs 15 properl positioned. The inner end of the plate 13 has centrally fixed thereto by rivets or'like elements an arched metal shank 15 which is arranged beneath the arch 11 of the insole 8.

The metal shank 15 is arched so that the v same will overlie and have its free end connected to a thin metal plate 16 which is arranged over the heel portion of the leather member 5. The heel portion 12 of the insole has secured on its inner face a metal .7

plate 17 which is provided with apertures that register with the apertures in the said heell portion of the shoe. The plate is, of course, shaped to correspond in shape to the heel portion 12 of the insole and likewise, the heel portion of the main sole of the shoe. T he plate 17 has fixedly secured on its inner face a plurality of short helical springs 18 which are in contact with the metal plate 16. The outer rounded edge of the notchesQO to aiford air ports or passages, and the rounded edge of the heel portion 12 of the insole is notched to provide the same with plate 17 is provided with a flange 19 that has spaced an arcuate slot 21 disposed opposite certain of the notches 20 of the flange 19. The notches 20, and 21 afford air passages for the rearof the shoe 1.

The plate 17, and the plate 13 are of thin but strong metal while the shank plate 16 is of stiff metal. The flanges 19 (which are of a less length than the normally expanded springs 18), when brought'against the plate 16, by the weight of the user of the shoe, limits the compression of the springs 18, and

consequently the movement ofthe, heel plate 17 in the direction of the heel of the shoe. The sole and shank portion of the insole 8 has its edges stitched to the flange 4 of the main shoe and to the inturned edges of the body of the shoe, so that only the central and reinforced portion of the sole part 8 of the insole is yieldable.

From the foregoing description. when read in connection with the accompanying drawing it will be apparent that the improvement effectively cushions the foot of the user of the shoe and that in walking the yieldable sole and heel portions of the inner sole willbe depressed when the shoe is brought into ground contacting position and will be expanded when the shoe is lifted off the ground so that the foot of the user is afforded a, con,- tinuous circulation of air. The improvement is, broadly speaking, in the nature of an air pump and such air is not only distributed to the sole and under face of the heel of the user, but along the sides of the users foot and especially along the sides of the heel of the user of the shoe. The foot of the user is naturally moved toward the front of the shoe and is not in direct contact with the rear of the shoe, so that the ports or notches 20 and 21 will open to each other and a vol.- ume of air will be pumped through these notches. When, however, the foot of the useris set for action, or in other words the user is walking, the foot in the shoe slides toward the back of the shoe, commonly called the counters, and such movement will cover the notch 21 so that an intermittent flow of air is directed through the said notch or open.- ing 21 when the user raises and lowers his foot in ground contacting engagement when walking. The inner sole is of soft leather and effectively cushions the foot of the user of the shoe and it is thought the foregoing derounded rear portion provided with a depending flange which is notched, coiled compression springs on the under face of the said apertured plate of a normal length greater than that of the flange, and a leather inner sole having its front and rear portion apertured, its central portion connected to the metal shank, its edges stitched to the flange of the shoulder and the rounded edge of its heel portion provided with an arcuate notch disposed outwardly of the notched flanges on the apertured heel plate.

In testimony whereof I aflix my signature.

EDWIN H. HELLER.

scription will fully and clearly set forth the I simplicity of my construction and the advantages thereof, so that further detailed description will not be required.

It is to be further noted that the improve ment provides the shoe with a double air pump, one arranged at the sole andthe other at the heel portion of the shoe.

Having described the invention, I claim;

A foot cushioning and ventilating shoe including a sole provided with a continuous upstanding flange that affords the sole with an air pocket, a compressible strip arranged in the pocket and having its sole-portion centrally slitted, a metal reinforcing plate in the slit, a thin metal plate overlying; the strip at the heel portion thereof, a stifli metal shank secured to the arch ofthe strip and to the metal heel plate, an apertured metal plate to which the front end of the shank is secured, coiled expansion springs between said apertured metal plate and the sole portion of the compressible strip, an apertured plate at the heel portion of the pocket having its

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2720041 *Mar 31, 1953Oct 11, 1955Kalman KajtarFootwear with provision to change the air therein
US4222182 *Feb 21, 1979Sep 16, 1980Sears David GShoe insole
US5235761 *Oct 3, 1991Aug 17, 1993Chang Che YuanMultiple-purpose elastic shoe
US6487796Jan 2, 2001Dec 3, 2002Nike, Inc.Footwear with lateral stabilizing sole
US6857202May 5, 2003Feb 22, 2005Phoenix Footwear Group, Inc.Footwear construction
US6880267Jan 28, 2004Apr 19, 2005Nike, Inc.Article of footwear having a sole structure with adjustable characteristics
US6898870Mar 20, 2002May 31, 2005Nike, Inc.Footwear sole having support elements with compressible apertures
US6964120Nov 2, 2001Nov 15, 2005Nike, Inc.Footwear midsole with compressible element in lateral heel area
US6968636Apr 26, 2004Nov 29, 2005Nike, Inc.Footwear sole with a stiffness adjustment mechanism
US6976319Sep 28, 2004Dec 20, 2005Phoenix Footwear Group, Inc.Footwear construction
US7082698Jan 8, 2003Aug 1, 2006Nike, Inc.Article of footwear having a sole structure with adjustable characteristics
US7401418Aug 17, 2005Jul 22, 2008Nike, Inc.Article of footwear having midsole with support pillars and method of manufacturing same
US7493708Feb 18, 2005Feb 24, 2009Nike, Inc.Article of footwear with plate dividing a support column
US7533477Oct 3, 2005May 19, 2009Nike, Inc.Article of footwear with a sole structure having fluid-filled support elements
US7748141May 18, 2006Jul 6, 2010Nike, IncArticle of footwear with support assemblies having elastomeric support columns
US7774955Apr 17, 2009Aug 17, 2010Nike, Inc.Article of footwear with a sole structure having fluid-filled support elements
US7810256Apr 17, 2009Oct 12, 2010Nike, Inc.Article of footwear with a sole structure having fluid-filled support elements
US7841105Dec 7, 2009Nov 30, 2010Nike, Inc.Article of footwear having midsole with support pillars and method of manufacturing same
US8065817 *Feb 11, 2009Nov 29, 2011Francis Edward LevertCushioning apparatus for ambulatory use
US8302234Apr 17, 2009Nov 6, 2012Nike, Inc.Article of footwear with a sole structure having fluid-filled support elements
US8302328Jun 29, 2010Nov 6, 2012Nike, Inc.Article of footwear with a sole structure having fluid-filled support elements
US8312643Sep 28, 2010Nov 20, 2012Nike, Inc.Article of footwear with a sole structure having fluid-filled support elements
US8656608Sep 13, 2012Feb 25, 2014Nike, Inc.Article of footwear with a sole structure having fluid-filled support elements
WO1989009552A1 *Nov 1, 1988Oct 19, 1989Nikola LakicHeated and cooled boot and suit with forced air circulation
Classifications
U.S. Classification36/3.00R
International ClassificationA43B7/00, A43B13/18, A43B7/06
Cooperative ClassificationA43B13/182, A43B7/06
European ClassificationA43B7/06, A43B13/18A1