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Publication numberUS1870547 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 9, 1932
Filing dateJan 23, 1930
Priority dateJan 23, 1930
Publication numberUS 1870547 A, US 1870547A, US-A-1870547, US1870547 A, US1870547A
InventorsWilliam Levy Aaron, Wise Pearl L
Original AssigneeWilliam Levy Aaron, Wise Pearl L
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Automatic telephone dialing and recording apparatus
US 1870547 A
Abstract  available in
Images(6)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

N. WISE 1,870,547

AUTOMATIC TELEPHONE DIALING AND RECORDING APPARATUS Aug. 9, 1932.

Filed Jan. 23, 1930 6 Sheets-Sheet l nDll INVENTOR BY MW @1/1 wztmc ATTORNEY-5' Aug. 9, 1932. N. WISE 1,870,547

AUTOMATIC TELEPHONE DIALING AND RECORDING APPARATUS Filed Jan. 23, 1930 6 Sheets-Sheet 2 APPARATUS N. WISE Aug. 9, 1932.

AUTOMATIC TELEPHONE DIALING AND RECORDING Filed Jan. 25, 1930 6 Sheets-Sheet 3 INVENTQOR N. WISE 1,870,547

AUTOMATIC TELEPHONE DIALING AND RECORDING APPARATUS Aug. 9, 1932.

Filed Jan. 23, 1950 6 Sheets-Sheet 4 I I6 HUN 1 H W YZWW ATTORNEYS N. WISE Aug. 9, 1932.

AUTOMATIC TELEPHONE DIALING AND RECORDING APPARATUS Filed Jan. 23, 1930 6 Sheets-Sheet 5 INVENTOR 7L M M UM ATTORNEYJ' mm W QNNRN Au 9, 1932. N. WISE 1,870,547

AUTOMATIC TELEPHONE DIALING AND RECORDING APPARATUS Filed Jan. 23, 1936 6 Sheets-Sheet 6 INVENTOR {ATTORNEYS Patented Aug. 9, 1932 NATHAN WISE, OB MOUNT VERNON, NEW YORK;

PEABLL. WISE AND AARON WILLIAM LEVY EXEOUTOBS OI SAID NATHAN WISE, DECEASED AUTOIATIO TELEPHONE DIALING. AND RECORDING APPARATUS Application filed January 23, 1930. Serial m. 422,719.

The present invention relates to telephone apparatus and has particular reference to automatic telephone dialing and recording apparatus for use with telephone equipment such as is ordinarily employed at subscribers stations in connection with automatic telephone systems. 4

An object of the invention is to provide an apparatus which, when operatively associatlq ed with a telephone equipped with a device for the manual transmittal of telephone numbers, is adapted to automatically transmit a telephone number without recourse to any manual operation of said manual transmittal 1: device.

Another object of the invention is to, provide, in an apparatus of the character men tioned, means whereby the numbers called with theaid of such apparatus may be autoso matica-lly recorded. a

A further object of the invention is to provide, in an apparatus of the character mentioned, means whereby the time at which each call is made may be automatically re- 88 corded.

Another object of the invention is to provide, in an apparatus of the character mentioned, means whereby the time at which each call is completed may be recorded.

vide, in an apparatus of the character mentioned, means whereby the time at which each call is begun and the time at which each call is completed respectively, in accordance with the instant at which the receiver is lifted from its supportinghook and replaced thereon, whereby an A further object of the invention is to proily determined.

Another object of the invention is to provide an apparatus of the character mentioned which is adapted to automatically transmit in succession the-telephone numbers of various parties without necessitating any F attention or manual operation on the part of the subscriber or operator other than the raising of the receiver from and the lowering of the same to its supporting hookto respectively start and end each call. 60 A further object of the invention is to pro- .vide,

may be automatically recorded,

detail of the switch the duration of individual calls may be read- F' vide an apparatus of the character mentioned which is so constructed that it may be oper atively associated with a telephone of the dial-operated type without requiring any alterati'on whatsoever of such telephone.

Another object of the invention is to pro vide an apparatus of the character mentioned which is adapted to be easily and quickly attached to and detached from a standard'type of dial-operated telephone and w 'ch is so constructed that it does not interfere with the usual operation of such telephone when it is in association therewith.

A. further object of the invention is to pro in an apparatus of the character mentioned, means adapted to cooperate with the usual dialing device of standard t pes of dial-operated telephones, whereby de 'te arcuate movements may be imparted to such dialing device to promote accuracy and res liability in the automatic transmittal of telephone numbers.

Other objects and advantages of the invention will become apparent from the following description, taken in connection with the accompanying drawings in which Fig. 1 is a front view of said apparatus with some parts removed and operatively'attached to a telephone having a receiver and a fingerwheel for transmittal of telephone numbers; Fig. 2 is a plan view, partly in section, of said apparatus with upper parts removed; Fig. 3 is a front sectional view, taken on the line 3+3 of Fig. 2, of an automatic switch mechanism; Fig. 3a is a sectional view taken on theline 3a3a of Fig. 2 and illustrates a mechanism ofFig. 3; 1g. 36 is a fragmental view illustrating another detail of the switch mechanism of Fig. 3; Fig 4 is a profile view, taken on the line 4.4 oFFig. 1, of magazines carrying telephone number records and two operatively associated automatic power control switches; ig. 5"is a back view, taken on the line 5-5 of Fig. 4, of saidmagazines, shown in section, saidpower control switches and additional parts operatively associated with the latter'; Fig. 6 is a fra ental plan view, part iy in section and ta en on the line 66 of ig. 1, of some of the parts shown in Figs. 4 100 use bysuch and 5; Fig. 7 is a profile view, partly in section, taken on the broken lines 7 -7 of Fig. 1, and illustrates details of the apparatus Fig. 8 is a fragmental profile view, partly in section, taken on the line 8-8 of Fig. 1, and illustrates other details of the apparatus; Fig. 9 is a detail view of a solenoid mechanism and telephone number recording hammer cooperating therewith; Fig. 10 is a profile view, partly in section, taken on the line 10-1O of Fig. 1 and illustrates stillother details of the apparatus; Fig. 11 is a profile view, taken on the line 1111 of Fig. 2 and illustrates another automatic switch mechanism; Fig. 12 isa fragmental sectional view, taken on the line 12-12 of Fig. 2 and illustrates a gear having slip rings and terminals thereon; Fig. 13 is a iragmental profile view, taken on the line 1313 of Fig.- 2, and illustrates a dashpot; Fig. 14 is a perspective view of a telephone number record; Fig. 15 is a fragmental view of a paper ribbon having time and telephone number records printed thereon; and

Fig. 16 is a wiring diagram of the electrical parts of the apparatus. a

The apparatus embodying this invention may be advantageously used, wherever dialare used, with substantialis'aving in time and labor and with the elimination of possible errors in dialing, and will be iound particularly advatageous for subscribers as banks, brokerage houses and the like whose business require them or their priVate-branch-exchange operators to make a large number of daily calls in succession or'in repeated succession.

Referring to Fig. 1, an ordinary telephone of the dial-operated type usually employed at subscriber-stations is shown, and comprises a telephone 1, a receiver 2, a receiver hook 4 and a finger-wheel 5 for manual transmittal of telephone numbers; The telephone 1 is adapted to be fixedly held to a base 6 by means of a plurality of brackets 7 engaging the lower sides of the telephone base 9. As shown in Fig. 2, one of these brackets is movable and adapted to be operated by any suitable means, to provide for the positioning an removal, whenever desired, of the telephone 1 on and fromthe base 6 respectively.

Referring particularly to Figs. 1 and.-7,

the base 6 has fixed thereto a motor 11, the

' shaft of which carries a worm 12. Also secured to the base 1 is 'a fame 14 carryinga stud 15 around whicha gear 16 engaging with the worm 12 is adapted to rotate. A magnetic element 17, preferably in the form of a disc,

is adapted to rotate tive to said-disc. Said clutch 20 may be car- .around the shaft 32 and 41-.(Fig. 7) sitioned and which may be formeddntegral with the gear 16. The stud 15 alsoprovides a pivot for a gear 19 19'as to move with Thus, when the clutch with said gear 27. A bevel gear 30 is adapted to rotate with the gear 29 and may be made integral with the latter so as to rotate around the pivot 25. Meshing with the bevel gear 30 is another bevel gear arounda rotatable shaft 32, the bearings and SXEPPOItS of which will be described hereina ter.

Referring to Figs. 3 and 3a, the shaft 32 carries a pin 3 1 which extends through a slot 35 formed through a hub 36 movably fitted' which maybe integra with the bevel gear 31 so as to rotate with the latter. Carried by the hub 36 is a pin 37 and a tensibn spring 39 has its ends connected to pins 34: and 37 respectively. The pin 34 serves to maintain the bevel gear 31 in engagement with the bevel gear 30, and, in cooperation with the pin 37 and the spring 39, to provide rotation-ofthe shaft 32 by reason of a rotation of the bevel gear 31'. The pin 34 and the slot 35 serve, however, an additional purpose which will be understood in the later description. Fixed to the shaft 32, near one end thereof, is a rotatable element or I cam 40 having a series of steps or projections which are predeterminedly potherewith.

From the above apparent that arotation of the gear 19, by reason of the action of the clutch 20 on the re volving disc 17, causes a corresponding rotation of the element iO through the medium of the pinion 26, the gears 27 and 29, gears 30'and 31 and the-shaft 32.

In accordance with the invention, the element 40 is caused torotate successivelyfrom a normal position of rest, and abutments 42 predeterminedly formed ou -telephone number records 44, (see Fig. 14), are caused to successively cooperate with projections 41 of the element 40 in limiting the successive rotations of, the element 40, whereby definite arcuate movements are imparted to the element 40; and movable means are provided for imparting to the impulse transmitting device 5 "movements corresponding to said suc- 31 movably fitted as I description, itnow becomes the bevel cessive mo'veinents of theelement 40. In the gears 19 and 27iandzterminating with a fin-L (which, it is noted, are caused to rotate in the same direction by reason of the pinion 26 meshing therebetweenl by means of the studs 47 and 49 eccentrically secured to the gears 19 and 27, so that arcuate motions are imparted to the finger 46 for actuation of the device 5 whenever the gears 19 and 27 and the element 40 are rotated. The rotatable element 40 and the movable means in liaison therewith are retained in a normal position of rest by any suitable means, such as a projection 49, (Fig. 7), formed on the element 40 and cooperating with a fixed abutment 50 and with a helical spring 52 (Fig. 1), coiled around the stud 24. one end of which spring may be fixed to the lower surface of the gear 27 and the other end of which may be fixed to the frame 14. Said abutment 50 is preferably formed 'on a magazine structure 51 which will be described hereinafter. Said spring 52 also serves to restore the element 40 and the movable means including the link to their normal position of rest after each successive movement of same.

The projections 41 on the element 40 are necessarily equal in number to the number of the usual finger-wheel openings 54. (usually ten) These projections 41 are so positioned relatively to one another and to the projection with the finger 46 preferably enga ing the advance of the device 5 from the finger-catch 53. actuations of the device 5, corresponding to definite movements of the element 40 governed by said projections 41 co-acting with telephone number record abutments 42 predeterminedly placed inltheir path, result in .proper transmittal of telephone numbers.

Means are preferably provided formaintaining the finger 46 out of engagement with the device 5 when said finger is in its position of rest. In the embodiment of the invention shown in the drawings. these means comprise a pivotal connection 55 of the finger\46 to the main body of the link 45 and a supporting post 56, fixed to the frame 6. Said post 56 has its upper end formed with an inclined surface over which the finger 46 is adapted to move, whereby the finger 46 is raised out of engagement with the device 5 when it is restored to its normal position of rest. and lowered in operative engagement with the device 5 when it is rotated from its position of rest. A projection 57 fixed to the finger 46 cooperates with the link 45 in limiting he downward movement of the finger 47 for proner cooperative action with the device 5. he spring (not shown) usually associated with a finger-wheel for restoring the latter to its position of rest assists the function of the spring 49. which governs their positions ,of rest, that,

52 in restoring the-element '40 and the movable means including the link 45 to their normal position of rest.

It is to be noted that the lowering and raising of the finger 46 in and out of engagement with the device 5 necessitates an initial movement of the finger 46 before engagement of the latter with the edge of the opening 54, successive movements of the finger 46 for actuation of the device 5 being thus necessarily greater than the movements of the latter by this initial movement of the finger 46. These required greater movements of the finger 46 are provided by suitably positioning the projections 41 with relation to the projection 49 -which governs the position of rest of the element 40. A relative disposition of the projections 41 and of the projection 49 on the element 40, suitable for proper operation of a finger-wheel 5 of the usual type provided in telephone apparatus; is shown in Fig. 7.

One of the edges of the projection 49 cooper-' ates with the abutment 50 in determining the position of rest of the element 40, but the opposite edge of said projection 49 serves as a projection 41 to produce, in cooperation with a telephone number record abutment 42, the greatest arcuate movement of the element 40 for transmittal of an electrical impulse by the finger-wheel 5.

The clutch 20, cooperating with the revolving disc 17, is caused tobe energized and de-en'ergized, re pectively, at substantially the instant the element 40 reaches its position of rest and at substantially the instant such element cooperates with an abutment .42. Referring particularly to Fig. 3, two spring contacts 59 and 60 providing switching means for the magnetic clutch 20 are adapted to be held normally in contact with one another, and, when in this normal position ofcontact. permits a current to flow through .the clutch'20. Said contacts 59 and 60 are carried by an insulating block 61, which may be secured to the magazine structure 51, and

may be provided with terminals 59a and 60a for connection thereto of lead-in wires. The shaft 32, rotatably mounted at one end in a supporting bracket 62 which may be secured to said structure 51, has an inner bore in which is slidingly fitted a plunger 64, to the outer projecting end of which is secured an insulating cap 65 co-operating with the spring contact 59 in opening and closing the spring contacts 59 and 60. A compression 64. Saidpin 70 cooperates with a projecment 42 is placed in the path of a projection 41 of the element 40, the rotation of said element-and of the shaft 32 fixed thereto is instantaneously arrested, although the train of gears 19, 26, 27, 29, and 31 may still continue rotating by reason of the yieldable connection of the gear 31 with the shaft 32, the pin 34 being relatively displaced in the slot 35 against the tension of the spring 39. The gear 31, upon rotation with respect to the shaft 32, causes the pin 70 to cooperate with the cam 71, so that an outward movement of the plunger 64 and a corresponding separation of the springs 59 and 60 is produced, this de-energizing the clutch 2O whereupon rotation of the gear 31 and its associated train is discontinued. The cam 71 is formed with a catch 72 which retains the pin 70 in an outward position against the force of the spring 39, this permitting a continued separation of the springs 59 and 60 and correspondingly permitting the element 40 and the movable means in liaison therewith to reverse in rotation and be restored to their normal positions of rest by reason of the action of the spring 52. It is noted that, when the reverse rotation of the element 40 is checked by the cooperative action of the projection 49 on said element with the abutment 50 (Fig. 7), the reverse rotation of the shaft 32 and of the pin 34 is also arrested,

buta continued rotationof the train of gears I including the bevel gear 31 is caused by'the action of the springs 52 and 39, effecting a (reverse relative displacement of the pin 34 in the slot 35 and a release of the pin from the catch 72 and cam 71. The plunger 64 is then retracted by the spring 66-and the springs59 and 60 close to again energize the clutch 20. Evidently the normal position of rest of all of the gears described is determined by the pin 34 co-actin'g with oneend of the slot 35, as shown in Figs. 3a and 3b.

. Means for permitting passage of current throu'ghthemevable clutch 20 comprise a pair ofslip rings 74 and 75 (Figs. 2 and 12), carried by an insulating element-secured to the gear 19 on its uppersurface. Said slip rings 74 and 75 may be provided with terminals 74a and 7 5a respectively. Conductors '76 and 77 connect the terminals of the clutch 20 to the slip ring terminals 79a and 79b reepective'ly, said conductors 76 and 77 rotatin with the gear 19 and the clutch 20. An insulating plate 82 (Fig. 2) holds a pair of brushes 80 and 81 in operative engagement with the slip rings 74 and 75 respectively. Said plate 82 may be conveniently secured to 85 the post 56. Terminals 80a and 81a for the brushes 80 and 81 respectively permit connection of'lead-in wires 84 and 85.

From the above description it becomes apparent that by proper energization and deenergization of the clutch 20, definite suc- I cessive movements from a position of rest may be automatically imparted to the finger 46. It is noted that these movements are not in exact identical proportion to the movements of the element 40 by reason of the displacements of the gears 19.to 31 and of v tioned to properly actuate the device 5 for transmittal of telephone numbers, when definite arcuate movements are imparted to the element 40.

In accordance with the invention, means are provided for displacing a telephone number record 44 the distance of an abutment 42 for each successive rotation of the element 40, so

as to provide successive rotation limiting acs I tions of abutments 42 with cooperative proj ections 41. Referring particularly to Fig. 1, the magazine structure 51, which will be later completely described, has an open slot 83 within which the projections 41 of the element 40 are normally free to rotate and the inner end of which forms the aforesaid abutinent '50. co-acting. with the projection 49 on the element 40 in limiting reverse rotations of the latter. v 4 I Said structure 51 so carries a telephone number record .44 as to permit the aliutments 42 of said record to be successively positioned within the slot 83 in the path of projections 41 for cooperation therewith, when said record is cau'sed'to be displaced. Said structure51 is carried tively to one side of the structure 51 and to the base 6. A carriage 87, preferably in the form of an elongated flat strip, has bifurcated ends 87a and 87b slidingly held within corresponding slots89a and 896 (Fig. 4) formed through the side of the structure 51', and is also slidingly held by a clamp 90 secured to by a flat angu- I lar bracket 86 having legs secured respec the supporting bracket86. The ends 87 a and 87 b of the carriage 87 when the carriage 87 is caused to move, cooperate with a long edge of a telephonenumber record 44, assumed to be initially operatively positioned in the structure 51, in displacing said record in the structure 51. v

A spring 91, one end of which may be se- .125,

cured to a projection 92 integral with the. carriage 87 andthe other end of which may be secured to a side bracket 93 fixedto or integral with the bracket 86, cooperates with a pin 94 co-acting with the carriage 87 in re taining the latter in a normal position of rest,

the ends 870 and 87 b of the carriage 87 bein then still retained within the slots 89a an 89?). Secured to the carriage 87 is a ratchet 95 which cooperates with a pair of pawls 96 and 97 in displacing the carriage 87 and correspondingly displacing abutments 42 within the slot 83 in the path of projections 41. The pawl 96 serves to retain the carriage 87 against the force of the spring 91 when said carriage 87has been displaced by the pawl 97 by means which will be presently described. The pawl 96 may be pivotally carried by the bracket 86 and is normallyheld in operative engagement with the ratchet 95 by means of a spring 99 which may be secured at its ends to the pawl 96 and to the clamp 90 respectively. The mechanism actuating the pawl 97 comprises a lever 100 ivotally connected between its ends to a fixe stud 101, which is secured to a support 102. The latter may provide a beari \g for the shaft 32 and may be made integral with the stud 25 secured to the frame 14. One end of the lever 100 is pivotally connected to the pawl 97, and its other end 103 cooperates with a recess 104 formed on the upper surface of a wheel 105 which may be secured to or made integral with the gears 29 and 30, so as to rotate with the latter. A spring 107 having its ends secured respectively to the pawl 97 and to the lever 100 normally retains the pawl 97 in operative engagement with the ratchet 95. When the element 40 and the movable means in liaison therewith including the wheel 105 are in their normal position of rest, end 103 of the lever 100 normally rests in the recess 104; but, when said element and wheel are caused to rotate, said end 103 is caused to slide out of there'cess. 104, this causing an arcuate movement of the lever 100 and permitting the latter in cooperation with the pawl 97 to adlac'd osition. P B P Vance the ratchet 95 and the carriage 87 against the force of the spring 91, thereby advancing the telephone number record 44 the distance of an abutment 42 in the structure 51 and placing an abutment 42-within the slot 83. When said element and wheel are being restored to their position of rest, the lever. end 103 slides back into the recess 104, thus restoring the pawl 97 to its original position but advancing same along the ratchet95 by reasonof 'the action of the other pawl 96 which has retained the ratchet 95' in its dis- Thus the lever 100 and the pawl 97 may again advance the ratchet 95 and the carriage 87 when said element 40 and movable-means are again rotated. It is noted that the action of the lever end "103 with the I recess 104 is such that the carriage 87 is abutment 42 being thus quickly displacedinto the slot 83 so as to place said abutment in.

quickly displaced the moment the element 40 starts rotating, a telephone number record operative position for cooperative'action with a forthcoming cooperative projection 41 of parted to the element 40 for proper automatic actuation .of the device 5.

In accordance with the invention, means are provided for automatically releasing the carriage 87 to itsnormal position of rest after completion of successive cooperative actions of projections 41 with abutments 42 of a telephone number record 44. Also, means in cooperation with the usual switch or ,receiver hook 4, rendering the telephone operative and inoperative to start andend a call, are provided for automatically rendering operative the motor 11 and the clutch 20, which cause the various movements of the apparatus described. Still othermeans are provided for automatically rendering inoperative said motor 11 and clutch 20 after the device 5 has been actuated for proper transmittal of a telephone number.

Referring particularly to Fig. 1, the shaft 32 has an end projecting outwardlyifrom the aforesaid bracket 93 to which it is rotatably mounted, this end being fitted with a collar ios end of which may be connected to the bell crank 111 and the other end to the bracket 86 cooperates with a pin 119, fixed to the bracket 86, in retaining the bell crank '111 in a nor mal position of rest, thereby permitting engagement of the pawls 96 and 97 with the ratchet 95. A pin 120 is predeterminedly secured to the outermost end of the carrage 87 so that the last,

displacement of. the carriage 87, caused by the last rotation of the element 40, causes said pin to cooperate with arm 1116 of the bell crank 111 in forcing the inclined surface 121,-formed on'the end of. said arm 1116, in

the path bf the'pin 110, thereby causing a swinging action of the bell-crank 111 against the force of the spring 117 and at raising of the pawls 96 and 97 by the catch 114 out of operative engagement with the ratchet 95. When this action occurs, the carriage 87 is substantially instantaneously restored to its normal position of rest by reason of the action of the spring 91. A

ICC

- an the pin 110 to reverse in rotation and be It is noted that the operation of the bell crank 111 depends on a rotation of the element 40. For a purpose which will be later understood, the operation of the bell crank 111 is caused by a rotation of the element 40 produced after all of the abutments 42 of a telephone number record have co-acted with the element 40. This after-employed rotation of the element 40 is made small so that the corresponding movement of the device 5 by the finger 46 does not result in a transmittal of an electrical impulse. It is noted that a device 5 of the type shown in the drawings must be actuated over an appreciable arcuate length, before an electrical impulse may be transmitted by same, so that proper transmittal of telephone numbers is not impaired by the last movement of the device 5 caused by said after-emplo ed rotation of the element 40. -As will be ater understood,'saidafter-employed short rotation of the element 40 is checked by a de-energiza .'tion of the clutch 20, caused by the means,

, i the pin 110 ocbu'rs,the end 121 of the bell crank" which are to be described, for automatically rendering the motor 11 and the clutch 20 inoperative after a transmittal of a telephone number.

Thus, the checking of this final rotation of the element by a de-energization of the ma etic clutch 20 permits the element 40 restored by the spring 52 to their normal position of rest. r When this reverse rotation of 111 moves out of engagement with the pin ,a 110, thereby causing a lowerin of the catch 114 by reason of the'action of t e spring 117. ,The pawls 96 and 97 are then lowered, by

Qwith'a telephone number record for a sucreason of the action of the springs 99 and 107, in operative en agement withthe ratchet 95 in its osition 0 rest so that the carriage 87 may e again displaced for cooperation ceeding automatic operation of the device 5.

Referring particularly to Figs. 4 and 5,

the means for rendering the power means including the motor 11 and the clutch 20, controlling the various movements of the apparatus described, automatically operative and inoperative, comprise two switches 134 and 135 both of which control said power means. One switch 134 is automatically closed and opened upon actuation of the switch or receiver hook 4 to start and end a call, respec-' tively. The other switch '135 is automatical- 1y closed when actuating the receiver hook 4 to end a call, and is automaticall opened after the various movements of t e a paratus to automatically transmit a telep one number, including the release of the carriage 87, have taken place.

A vertical rod 136 (,Fig. 1) having its upper end formed with a clasp 137, engaging thereceiver hook 4 so as to move the same, slidingly engages a tubular support 139, se-

surface of the base 6. Fixedly secured to the shaft 141, at a predetermined point, 'is another crank 144, (Fig. 7), the outer end of which is pivotally connected to 'a vertical rod 145 extending through the base 6. The

upper end of the rod 145 is pivot'ally connected to a link 146, pivotally mounted on the structure 51 by the pin 147 fixed to one side of said structure, said pin 147 permittin an arcuate motion of the link 146. Said ink 146 carries an insulating block 149 to which a contact point 153 cooperating with the spring contact 150 in providing the ower control switch 134. Said contact 153 is also provided with a terminal 154, said contact 153 and terminal 154 being insulated from the bracket 152 by any suitable means.

The upper end portion of the tubular support '139 is formed with an inner bore 155 of diameter suitably greater than that of the rod 136. A compression spring 156 is positioned in said bore 155 between a collar-157 fixed to the rod 136 and the shoulder 158 formed by the lower end of the bore 155. This spring 156 serves to move the rod 136 upwardly when the receiver 2 is removed from the receiver hook 4, the rod 136 beingmoved downwardly, by reason of the weight of the receiver 2, against the force of the spring 156, when the receiver 2 is a ain placed in position on the receiver hoo 4. It is noted that the spring arrangement, (not shown), usually associated with a receiver hook 4, assists the function of the spring 156 in raising the rod 136 when the receiver 2 is removed from the receiver hook 4. It is now readily seen that a removal of the receiver 2 from its support 4 causes an upward movement of the rod 145 and of the link 146, thereby automatically closing the contacts 15(Land 153. The latter are adapted to control both the operation of the motor 11 and of the magnetic clutch 20, so that, when a telephone record 44 is properly positioned in the strucoperates with a movable contact 160, which may be provided with a terminal 160a. Said contact 160 and terminal 160a are secured to an insulating block 161 carried by an arouately movable member 162, the latter ,to-

gether with the,contacts 159 and 160 forming the power control switch 135. The member 162 is pivotally mounted on a stud 164 fixed to the bracket 86. The contacts 159 and 160 are frictionally held in engagement with each other against the force of a tension spring 165 one end of which may be connected to the member '162 and the other end to the bracket 86, this holding engagement being insured by providing a recess 163 on the contact 160 into which recess the curved end of the contact spring 159 is adapted to enter as shown in Fig. 4.

A right-angle foot 166, fixed to or integral with the arm 111a of the bell crank 111 at one end thereof, projects through a slot 167 formed through the bracket 86. This 'foot 166 raises the member 162, thereby causing a disengagement of the contacts 159 and 160,

when the arm 111a is caused to be raised by the action of the pin 110 with the .inclined surface 121 of the bell crank 111, said spring 165 then functioning to retain the member 162 in raised position. Evidently, the disengagement of the contacts 159 and 160 deenergizes the clutch 20 and permits the element 40 and rotatable means in liaison therewith to be restored to their position. of rest. It is readily understood that the action of the pin 110 and bell crank 111, which de- 'pends on a last rotation of the element 40,

is to first release thecarriage 87 to 'its position of 'rest, and then open the contacts 159 and 160, thereby limiting this last rotation of the element- 40. By proper design of the pin 110 and inclined surface 121 cooperating therewith, the opening of the contacts 159 and 160 and corresponding d-energization of the clutch 20 are caused to occur after only a short rotation of the element 40. The movement of the device 5 corresponding to this last short rotation of the element 40is .thus also small and less in magnitude than that definite movement which the device 5 requires before it may transmit anelectrical impulse, so that proper transmittal of a telephone number is not affected by this last rotation ofthe element 40. It is noted that.

the ratchet 95 and carriage -87' are displaced, by reasonof the quick action of the lever 100 with the wheel 105, before the action ofthe pm 110 with the-bell crank 111 takes place, this last displacement of the carriage :87 being useful for a purpose which will be. understood in the later description.

' Referring particularly .to Figs. 4 and 5, the' link 146 carries a foot 169 which lowers the switch member 162 from a raised tion, thereby causing re-engagement o the contacts 159 and 160, when said link 146 is ing of either of the switches 134 or-135, when closing of the contacts 59 and again by osicaused to be moved downward against the force of the spring 155 by reason of a downward movement of the receiver hook 4, as by a positioning of the receiver 2 thereon upon a completion of a call. Thus, assuming the 7( operative, thereby stopping the movements of the apparatus described, by reason of the opening of the switch 135. When the receiver 2 is again positioned on the receiver hook 4 after the particular call has been made, the switch 135 is placed automatically in a normally closed position by the foot 169, so that the apparatus is adapted to automatically start functioning when the re-.

-ceiver2 is again removed for making a succeeding call. K

Another power ,control switch 189 '(Fig. 2) serves to render the apparatus inoperative in case itis desired to dial the fingerwheel 5 manually, and is conveniently located on the base 6 for manual operation. Referring to the wiring diagram, shown in Fig. 16, the motor'll is placed in series with the control switches 134 and 135 by a conductor 190, said motor and switches be-' ing electrically connected to the switch 189 controlling the source of energy 191. One brush 80, in electricalconnection with a terminal of the clutch 20 through the slip ring 74, is electrically connected by a conductor 84 to the conductor 190 and thus through the switches 134 and 135 to one side of the switch 189. The other brush 81', in electrical connection with the other terminal of the clutch 20 through the slip ring 75, is connected by a conductor 85 to the spring contact 60. The spring contact 59 cooperating with the contact 60, isielectrically connected to the other side of the switch 189 through a suitable resistance 192.

Thus, when the switch 189 is closed, a closthe other is closed, renders "both the motor 11 and the clutch-20 operative, and an opening of either of the switches 134 or 135, when the other is closed, renders both the motor 11 and the clutch 20'inoperative. Also, assuming all three switches 189, 134 and 135 to be closed, an opening of thecontacts 59 and 60. by action of the plunger 64 de-energizes. the clutch 20, but permits the motor 11 to continue revolving, so that, upon reaction of the plunger 64, the rotary movements of the element 40 and of the finger I 46act-u'ating the device 5 are substantially r instantaneously started.

In accordance with" the invention means are provided for automatically placing in purpose of calling a plurality of parties one after the other; means are provided for facilitating manual positioning of any ofv said telephone number records, out of rotation, in operative position for proper co-' operation with the apparatus described.

Referring particularly to Figs. 4, 5, 6, and 7, the structure 51 comprises two containers or magazines 170 and 171, rectangular in cross-section, and preferably contiguous to one another. The structure 51 may be formed as a unit with a vertical partition 172 so positioned as to divide the structure 51 into two compartments forming the containers 170 and 171. The latter are made open at the top and closed at the bottom.

A telephone number record 44.is made for each telephone number which it is desired to transmit automatically. Referring to Fig. 14, these telephone number records, preferably made of metal, have legs 174 and 175 formed at extreme ends of the short edge on which the abutments 42 are formed, these legs 174 and 175 permitting the abutments 42 to be properly spaced with relation to the parts of the apparatus with which they function. The records 44 are preferably provided with indications 17 3a of the parties and .their telephone numbers, which indications are afiixed to the front faces of said records. If desired, tabs 1731) may be so positioned respectively on the top edgesof the records 44 that they may all be visible when the records 'are placed in stacked relation, manual removal of any particular record out of the stack being thus facilitated.

The container 17 0, serves to hold the records 44 in stacked relation with their legs 174 and 175 resting against the bottom thereof before automatic transmittal of their numbers, and the container 171 serves to store the records 44 after automatic transmittal of 1 their numbers,-the tabs'173b, if provided,

being visible and permitting easy removal of any of the records from the respective containers. Both containers 170 and 171 have resilient means 178 .(Fig. 7), holding the telephone number records in stacked and indexed relation against the front end of the containers. These resilient means 178 may each comprise a spring arrangement 17 6, op-

"carriage-87, and is transferred by the carriage 87 from the container 170 into the container 171 through a uassage or slot 181 (Fig.-

6), formed in the plane of the carriage 87 by spacing the partition 172 from the front end of the structure 51. This transfer effected .by cooperative action of the ends 87a and 87b of the carriage 87 with the adjacent long edge of said foremost record when the carriage is caused to be successively displaced, the abutments 42 of said record successively passing by the slot 83 formed in the front end of the structure 51. The front wall of the containers 17 0 and 171 are preferably provided with openings which expose to View the front face of the record to be or being transferred, so as to make known to the operator the party to be or being called.

. Referring to Fig. 5, the bottom of the container 170 is in a plane above the plane of the bottom of the container 171, the records in the container 17 O projecting above its open end. The bottom of the container '17 0 (Fig.

7) terminates'a substantial distance from thefront wallof the container so as to provide a slot 182 which is in the plane of the slot 181 and of the carriage 87. The forward end of the bottom of the container 170 carries a depending wall 184 which is spaced from the'lower or depending. portion 184a of the front wall of the container a distance equal to the width of the slot 182, the walls l84 and 184a being connected at their lower ends by a referred to, vis formed by cutting away the conti uous walls 184 and 184a of the pocket or su container 188 adjacent the partition 172. It is to be noted that the bottom section 183 of thesubcontainer is in horizontal alignment with the bottom of the container 171, so as to permit unobstructed passage of the successive foremost records from the sub-container 188 to the container 171 through the slot 181; and it is to be also noted that the successive foremost records are prevented by friction from dropping through the 'slot 182.

It n'ow becomes apparent that the successive foremost records in thescontainer 17 0, when lowered into the subcontainer 188, are initially positioned for proper cooperation with the element 401 as well as with the carriage 87, in which position the leg 174 of a record is located within the slot 83.

Assuming the foremost record in the container 0 to be initially positioned for proper cooperation with the carriage 87 and with the element 40, an actuation of the receiver hook4 to start a call. starts the functioning of the apparatus,-the carriage 87 dis lacing the leg 174 of said front record into t e container 171 and displacing its first abutment 42 into the slot 83.:for cooperation with the first rotation of the element 40. Abutments' 42 of said front recgd are then successively 'bottom section 183 so as to form a pocket or I a displaced into the slot 83, for-cooperation with the element40,'while said front record is simultaneously being-transferred into the container 171. k

Upon complete transfer of a record by the carriage 87 into the container171, the resilient mechanism 178-in the container 170 acts to displace the remaining records in the container 170 toward the front end of the latter, this forward displacement ofthe rep maining records only taking place after the carriage 87 has-been released to its normal position of rest. Thus, the resilient mecha nism 178 inthe container 170 serves to place the records in said container, one after the other, contiguous to i s front end and in the of the opening of the switch 135.

plane of the carriage 87and slot 182. To-

permit the telephone number records to be .successivelyzstored in the container ,171, a

tainer 171, and is so curved at its free end.

that, by reason of its yielding action, it permits transfer'of arecord between it and the preceding records which have been stored.

.. It is noted that a rotation of the element causes a displacement of an abutment 42 which limits this same rotation of the element. Thus, after all of the abutments 42v sponding to the record which has been operativelypositioned by the finger 186 at the end of record have successively limited the ro- 1331310119 of the element 40, the last abutment 42 is still in the slot 83. Consequently, two further rotations of the element 40 are needed to cause the carriage 87 to completel displace the record from the container 1 0 into the container 171' for storage in the latter, the first of these two after-employed rotations of the element displacing the last abutment42 out of the slot 83 and the second displacing the leg 175 out of said slot 83.- The first of these two after-employed rotations of the element 40 maybe checked by the action of a projection 132, (Fig. 7), formed on the tainer 171, is checked by the demagnetiza-- tion ef the clutch 20, caused by the opening of the switch 135 as has already been explained.

It is noted that this final rotation of the ele- 'ment 40 first causes'the final displacement of the carriage 87, then the release of said carria e, and finally the opening of the switch 135. t is evident that, by making the leg 175 of a telephone number record of such small width as to be incorporated within the last abutment 42 of said record, only one after-employed rotation of the element 40 is then needed .to store said record in" the container 171. This single after-employed rotation of the element 40 may be checked by the demagnetization of the clutch 20 by reason Referring particularly to Figs. 1 and 4:, the Q end of the link 146 is formed with a finger 18.6, 'which cooperates with the top 'edgelof a front record in the container 170, initially held by friction in its upper position, in lowering said record to the bottom 183 of the sub-container 188, when thereceiver hook 4.- is actuated to end a call, thereby initially positioning said record for proper cooperation with the apparatus described. Thus, when the receiver hook 4 is again lifted to start a call, the apparatus automatically starts to dial the telephone number correof the preceding call.

Thus the apparatus cally transmits in succession the telephone numbers of'various parties, for the purpose of calling these parties one after the other, p

with the only manual labor involved being the raising and lowering of the receiver 2 o and on the receiver hook-4, to start and end eachcall, all of the telephone number records provided for these various parties beingsuccessivelyv transferred from the container 170 into the container 171 for storage therein.

If it is desired to call a certain party out of -rotation, its corresponding record-.may be element 40,-on the leg 175 of a record, said leg 175 being positionedin the slot 83 by reason of said first after-employedrotation of theelement 40. Said projection 132 isformed prior totheprojections 41 in the directionof advance of the element 40, so that the movement fofthe device 5 causedby thisfirst afteremploy'ed rotation of the element 40.i s less than the definite movement required for transmittal of van electrical impulse, proper.

transmittal of telephone numbers being thus 8 unimpaired. The last after-employed rotation of the element 40, causing-complete transfer ofva record for storagein the conmanually removed from eitherv stack of recrecord in the container 17 Ois caused manually to slideupwardly out'of the slot 182, manual pressure is exerted through the front opening of the container 170 on the stack of records in said container against the force of described automati- 'ordsin the containers 170 and 171, the front the resilient device 178, and the removed record placedahead of the front record in the contailier 170.

Since the number of required actuation's' of a device" 5 for transmittal of telephone numbers inay vary, means .are provided to adapt the. apparatus for general use with relation to said variation in the number of required actu-.

ations of the device 5. h

Referring to Fig. 14, the telephone number record shown is formed with seven abutments 42 causing seven transmittals of electrical mittal of the particular telephone number corresponding to this record. The width of the latter, however, is such that its lower edge .may accommodate a greater number of, abutments, say nine. After the abutments 42 of the record shown have all successively 'co-- operated with the element 40, further rotations of the element 40 are needed to cause the complete transfer of the record into the container'171 due to the presence of the edge portion 187. of the record, non-useful for transmittal of electrical impulses by the devioe'5. The edge portion 187 of a record may be utilized in limitin said further rotations of'the element 40.. Tire edge portion 187, by proper construction of the records 42 and'of the apparatus described, may be formed in horizontal alinement with the bottom edges of the legs 174 and 17 5. Thus, the edge portion 187 cooperates with the rojection 132 in checking the aforesaid nee ed rotations of the element 40 to transfer a record. These rotations of the element 40 are less in magnitude than the rotation which causes the device 5 to transmit an electrical impulse, so that proper transmittal of telephone numbers is not interfered with. When a record, constructed as shown in Fig; 14, is employed, the element successively rotates seven times to actually transmit the telephone number, then rotates once to displace t e'last abutment 42 out of the slot 83, then successively rotates twice to displace the edge portion 187 out of the slot 83, then rotates once to displace the leg 175 out of theslot 83 and finally store the record in the container 171, this final rotation being checked by the opening of the power control switch 13 From the above description, it is apparent that, by proper design of the apparatus described, telephone numbers requiring difierent numbers of actuations of the device 5 for transmittal of electrical impulses, may be automatically transmitted without altering an of the parts of said apparatus. A

n accordance with the invention, the

M means for recording the telephone num- -nally along the shaft 32, when the carriage.

bers dialed automatically,xinclude, ajtypewheel 194 (Fig. 1) longitudinally movable along), but fixedl y\ shaft 32 means 0 a slot and key arrangement .195 (Figs. 1 and .8). The afore-- said foot 92, formed on the carriage 87 coopprates with a collar 196, fixed to the typew eel 194, inv displacing the latter longitudi- 87 is displaced. Secured'to the bracket 86, at o posite edges thereof, are'the aforesaid sideracket 93 and the side bracket '197, both of said side-brackets being spaced from one another and Saar right angle to the bracket 86. These brackets 93 and-19 carry fixedbearings 199 and 200' for mounting therein of the shaft 32, the typewheel 194 rotatable ,with, the

- edges being movable partially within the space between said,brackets 93 and 197. The bracket 86 is formed with a rectangular opening 201, as best seen in Fig. 8, so located as to permit proper movement of the typewheel 194, a portion of which extends through said opening. The purpose of this opening 201 will be understood in the later description. It is seen that successive rotations of the element 40 to actuate the device 5 impart corresponding rotations to the typewheel 194. The latter has type figures formed on its periphery, preferably corresponding to thefigures usually associated with the openlngs 54 of a finger wheel 5.. These type figures areso positioned that they cooperate with a printing mechanism, actuated at the instant that a projection 41 of the element 40 co-acts with an abutment 42 of a telephone I number record 44, in printing on a record sheet 204 the figures corresponding to the successive actuations of the device 5. 'It is understood that the first few printed figures 1 on the record sheet 204 given an indication ofthe telephone ofiices or exchanges to [which the called parties'are connected, the printed records on the sheet 204 thus giving a coinplete indication of the telephone numbers automatically transmitted;

In the embodiment of-the invention shown in the drawings, the printed mechanism referredto comprises a hammer 202, (Fig. 2),

operated by a solenoid mechanism 203 (F1g. 9) which is successively energized at the instant that abutting actions of projections 41 of'the element 40 with abutments 42 of a telephone-number record 44 take place. The paper ribbon 204. is operatively positioned between the-haminer 202 and the typewheel 194-, and is fed under tension therebetween in a direction perpendicular to the axis of the shaft 32 from the pa er roll 205 (Figs. 1 and 8) to a take-up reel not shown in the drawing) Said paper roll 205 is remov'ably carried by a pin, supported parallelly to the axis of the shaft 32 by brackets 206 and 207. The latter may be fixed to the bracket 86. The paper 204' is at all times properly positioned with relation to thetypewheel 194 and the hammer-202 by two pairs of cooperating rolltwo open slots 291 and 292 (Fig.2) formed in the plates 197 and 93 respectively, said slots 0 cm 209, 210, and 2 1 1, 212-, (Fig. 8), placed provided for proper .alinement of the ribbon 291 and 292 permitting operative positioning and removal of the typewriter ribbon 213.

which the calls are started and ended; these means, as will be understood, also serve to properly displace the typewriter ribbon 203. Preferably, two small rollers 299 and 300 are 213 within the slots 291 and 292 and for cooperation with said ribbon 213'when it is caused to be displaced. These rollers may be rotatably mounted on suitable brackets, 303 and 303', fixed to or integral with the side brackets 93 and 197 respectively.

The width of the hammer 202 and of the paper 204 are such that the hammer 202 successively cooperates with the typewheel 194, as the latter is moved longitudinally along the shaft 32 by the carriage 87, in printing a record or a telephone number perpendicularly to the edges of the paper 204,.as illustrated in F ig: 15, the paper 204 being held 1' stationary when such recording takes place. s5 7 the solenoid mechanism 203 (Fig. 9) com- To the inner side of plate 197 ismounted prising a solenoid 216, co-acting with a plunger 217, operating a bell crank 219,'pivotedto the post 223. The latter, carries a pivoted arm 220, which cooperates with the hammerl202 through a mechanism which will be presently described.

Referring to Figs. 2 and 9, a hammer sup porting strip 221 is mounted parallel to the shaft 32.between the plates 93 and 197 and may be secured to the latter. Said strip 221 has two openings for slidingly mounting therein of a pair of pins 222 an 224, fixed tothe hammer 202 and to a connec ing member 225, the latter carrying a cap 226 coacting with the arm 220. The pins 222 and 224 are provided with springs 227 and 229, which normally hold thehammer 202.0ut of operative engagement with the paper ribbon 204:. c

Referring to Fig. 9, a spring 230 has one end connected to a post 231, fixed to the plate 197,- and the other end to a pin, 232,

fixedto the bell-crank 219. The spring 230 cooperates with a post 234 also fixed 'to the plate 197 in retaining the mechanism in a normal position of rest. The pivoted arm 220 is adapted tobe held against the pin 232 by means of a spring 235, which may be connected respectively to said arm'220 and to the bell crank 219. 'Thus, an energization of the solenoid 216 causes the arm 220 to pass, in its travel, in cooperative engagement with the cap 226, thereby causing a movement of the hammer 202 on the paper 204 against the force of the springs 227 and 229. Immediatelyafter passage of the arm the inward movement of the plunger 217 and the operative movement of the crank 219.

From the above description, it is clear that both the recording movement and release of the hammer 202 occur during a very'short interval of time, .sothat the hammer 202, when the solenoid 216 is energized by means which will be presently described, may properly record on the paper 204 at the instant the typewheel 194 reaches the end of its forward rotary movement, and that the deenergization of the solenoid 216 will not cause any recording action of the hammer 202.

Referring particularly to Fig. 3, means for successively energizing and de-energizing the solenoid 216, for successive recording actions of the hammer202, include a spring contact 237, which may be held on the afore said insulating block 61. Said spring contact 237 cooperates with the aforesaid spring .contact 59 in establishing and interrupting a circuit through the solenoid 216, by reason of the action of the plunger'64 and cap 65 attached thereto, the contact springs 59 and 237 being adapted to be held normally out [the other terminal of which is connected by a wire 240 to the wire 84 leading to the control switches 134 and 135. A circuit is thus I respectively de-energized and energized, by reason of the action of the mutually cooper ating contact spring 59 on'the con'tact springs 237 and 60..

It is now ,readily seen that, with the springs 59 and 237 normally spaced, a rotation limiting action of a projection 41 of the element 40 with an abutment 42' of a telephone number record 44 causes the plunger 64 to substantially simultaneously demag I established andinterrupted through the solcnoid 216,- when the clutch 20 is caused to be netiz the clutch and energize the solenoid 216, the hammer 202 then acting to record the figure corresponding to said rotation limiting action of a projection 41 with an abutment 42 at substantially the instant the rotary movement of the type-wheel 194 is correspondingly arrested. Upon the reverse'rotation of the element 40, the solenoid 216 is still energized but does not cause any recording of figures. Upon the element being restored to its position of rest, the

solenoid 216 is de-energized by reason of the action of the plunger' 64 retracting in the tubular portion of the shaft 32, thereby permitting the movable parts of the mechanism 203 to be restored to their normal position of rest, without causing any recording of figures by reason of the action of the pivoted arm 220, so that said mechanism 203 is replaced in condition to be again energized to properly record a figure corresponding to a succeeding rotation limiting action of a projection41 with an abutment 42.

Since the rotary movements of the typewheel 194 are exactly proportional to those of-xthe element 40, the type figures on said wheel 194 may be so positioned that the aforesaid after-employed rotations of the element '40, required to properly transfer a telephone number record in the magazine 171 for storage and limited by the aforesaid projection 132 c'o-aeting with an edge 187 and the leg- 17 5 of said telephone number record, do,not cause any recording of figures.

I "magnetization of the clutch, 20, caused by an.

It may be noted that the fillll rotation of the element 40 which is limite ,by the final deopening of the power control switch 135, does not result in an energizationof the solenoid 216. 1

r In accordance with the invention, means are *provided for recording the times at which the receiver hook 4 is actuated to start and end a call, for the purpose of indicating the times at which calls'are made and the Figs; 1 and 2, typewheels 241, 242 and 244, having formed duration of same.

Referring particularly to on their periphery .figure types indicating hours, minutes, and seconds, respectively, are

loosely carried by the shaft 32, so as'to be rotatable relatively to said shaft. These wheels 241, 242 and 244 are'operatively positioned with the aforesaid typewhe'el194 within the space between the side-brackets 93 and 197 and extend through the aforesaid opening 201' formed'through the bracket 86. .To the wheels 241, 242 and 244 are fixedly secured, respectively, gears 245, 246 and 247 (see par.-

ticularly Fig. 2). "The latter serve to actuate their respective type.wheels by reason of a clock mechanism 249 (Fig. 8-), (not shown in detail), in liason with said gears. The clock mechanism 249 may be conveniently secured to the back surface of the bracket 86,

openings formed in t may be convenientl the opening 201 permitting its connection with the gears 245, 246 and 247. The clock mechanism 249 is such that the type-wheels 241', 242 and 244-are caused to rotate continuously, and, preferably, typewheel 241 is caused to rotate once every twenty-four hours, typewheel 242 once every hour and typewheel 244 once every minute.

Referring to Figs. 2 and 8, the time typewheels described are operatively positioned with relation to the paper ribbon 204, the type writer ribbon 213 and to a hammer 250 movably mounted on the aforesaid hammer supporting strip 221, the width of said hammally retains the hammer 250 out of cooperative action with the time type-wheels, the

aforesaid pins 251 and 252 preventing arcuate displacement of the hammer 250.

Referring to Fig. 8, the aforesaid cap 255 cooperates with a solenoid mechanism 203 which is identicalto the solenoid mechanism 203 already described. This mechanism 203 mounted on the inner face of the aforesai plate 93. -.F or the purpose of brevity, themechanism 203 will not be described, corresponding n u an era 1 s, primed, being employed in connection, with the mechanism 203 to indicate parts corresponding to identical parts of the mechanism 203. It maybe well to note that the operation of the mechanism 203 is similarto thatof the mechanism 203, to effect instantaneous recording movement and release of the hammer 250. when the solenoid 216-is de-ener gized..

Means ing the solenoid 216 are provided to cause a ,movement ofthe hammer' 250 on-the paper 204 when the receiver hoolx 4 iseither raised or lowered to"startandend a call. Referring to-Fig. 11, these means include a paiv of sprin contacts 257 and 259 which may be mounte on an'i'nsulating'collar 260 fixed to the aforesaid tubular'support 139. The contacts 257 and 259 extend within slots 261 and 262, formed through said support 134, but

do not contact with any part of the' support 134. A contact collar 64 is' fixedly held on an insulating portion 265 of the aforesaid rod 136. Said collar 264 travels temporarily for both energizing and de-energizin contact with, but past the inner ends of,

thecontacts 257 and 259, therebytemporarily short-circuiting the same, during either an mer 250 and to prevent actuation of the ham il The'springs 257 and 259 slidingly engage the insulating portion 265 of .the rod 136 for any position of the latter except when in contact,with the collar 264. The springs 257 and 259 may be provided with terminals 257 a and 259a for connection thereto of lead-in wires. Referring to the wiring diagram (Fig. 16), one spring contact 257 is electrically connected to one side of the switch 189, and the other spring contact'259 is electrical- 1y connected through the solenoid 216' and the resistance 192 to the other side of the switch 189. From the above description, it is seen that the solenoid 216 is first energized to move the hammer 250 on the paper 204, and thereafter deenergized as the receiver solenoid 2,16 is'first energized to move the hammer 250 on the paper 204, and thereafter deenergized, as the receiver hook 4 is lowered to end a call, the first movement of the hammer 250 being to record the time at which a call starts and the second movement of such hammerbeing to record. the time at which "such call is completed. The hammer 250, it is noted, is quickin its printing action, it being caused to recede substantially instantabers 266 (Fig. 15), are positioned on the paper 204 in horizontal alinement with the I recorded times 267 at which the calls are started; and the recorded times 269 at which ,the calls are completed are positioned below the time records 267. Thus, the paper. 204 is displaced twice during one operation of the apparatus described to make a call. One displacement is caused to occur after a record 269 is made of. the time at which a call is ended, i. e. just before the receiver hook 4 has been completely moved to end a call, and the other displacement is caused to'occur just after a telephone number has been recorded Referring particularly to Fig. 10, the shaft 141 hasper'pendicularly fixed thereto a crank 270 to the end of which is' pivotally linked a rod 271. The latter extends through the base 6, is vertically and slidingly mounted in a tubular support 272, fixed to or integral with the base 6, and may also be slidably disposed in a tubular guide 313, forming I the shaft 141 that a downward movement of I art of the bracket 303-"which carries the a resaid roller 300. The aforesaid cranks 140 and 270 (see Fig. 2) are so positioned relatively to the rod 136, by reason of a lowering of the receiver hook 4 to end a call, raises the rod 271.

A pawl 274 is resiliently connected to the hook 4 is raised to start a call, and that the Y upper endof the rod 271. Said pawl 274 cooperates with a ratchet wheel 27 5, fixedly secured to the shaft 276 of the aforesaid roller rollers21-1 and 212 so that theaction of the pawl 274 and ratchet 27 5 causes arcuate displacement of both rollers 211 and 212 and thus a displacement of the paper 204. In the drawings these means comprise springs 277 acting on the ends of the shaft 278 of roller 312, said ends being held in the slots 279 formed in the two brackets 215 supporting the rollers 211 and 212. A 1

The apparatus is so designed that durin the movements of the rod 136 and of the ro 271 by reason of a lowering of the receiver hook 4 to end a call, the contact 264 (Fi 11) comesin contact with the springs 25 and 259 before the pawl 274 engages the ratchet wheel 275. Thus, the solenoid 216' operating the time-record-hammer 250 is energized before a displacement of the paper 204- by the ratchet wheel 275 takes place. This and the? quick action of the hammer 250 makes possible proper recording of the times at which the receiver hook 4 is being lowered to end calls made. Preferably, however, a dash-pot 280-'(Fig. 13) is provided to slow the moveproper operation of thea paratus described. This dash-pot 280 may he conveniently secured to the base 6, and is operated-by the movable'plunger'281, pivotally connected to too vi'ng or ending a call evidently not impairing the end of a crank 282, fixedly secured to the shaft 141..

It isnoted that upon. raisingthe receiver book 4 tostart a succeeding call, the rod 271 is moved to its lowermost position of rest, thereby disengaging the pawl 274 from its cooperating ratchet-wheel 27 5 so that'the paper 204 may again be displaced when lower-' ingthe'receiver hook 4th end thatcall.

The means for causing displacement of the paper 204 just after'a telephone number has been recorded include a foot 284 (Figs. 1 and 8), 'fixedly secured to the arm 111a of the bell crank 111. When the arm 111a is .The lower end of thegrod 285'seats against the foot 284 at all times, and a pawl 287,

resiliently mounted on the upper end of the,

- automatically transmitted and recorded. A

' rest; This disengages the pawl 287 from i s spring 290, located between a collar 293 fixed to the rod 285 and the lower end of the support 286, acts to restore the rod 285 to its lower-most position of rest, when the,

bell crank 111 has been restored to its lowermost position of rest by the final reverse rotatipn of the element 40 to its position of coacting ratchet wheel 289 andproperly positions it for again displacing the paper204 after a succeeding telephone number has been transmitted and recorded.

From the above description it is readily seenthat the paper 204 is already operatively positioned for proper recording thereon before thereceiver hook 4 is raised to start a call. When a call is made,'a time record is made of the time at which said receiver hook is raised; the telephone number is then transmitted and simultaneously recorded in alinement with said starting time; record; the paper 204 isthen displaced, before thedriv ing power of the apparatus is interrupted;

and the lowering of the receiver hook to end the call causes both, a record to be made, below the starting time record, of the. time at which the receiver hook is lowered, and also a displacement of the paper 204 to properly position it for recording thereon when the succeeding call is made.

Referring to Fig. 1, means for displacing the typewriter ribbon 203 include a bevel gear 301 fixed to the outer end of the roller shaft 276. A'second bevel gear 302, meshing with the bevel gear 301, is fixed to a vertical shaft 304 rotatably mounted at its upper end in a bearing support 305 fixed to or intewas , 306, and the actions of the rods 271 and 285,

gral with the bracket'86. 'The aha- 304 is also rotatably mounted at its lower end in a bearing support 314, which forms part of the aforesaid supporting bracket 303'. A gear 305 is fixedly secured to the shaft 304 and meshes with a gear306 fixedly secured to the take-up reel 296. I Thus, the take-up reel 296 is movable with the roller 211- by mears of the train of gears 301, 302, 305 and producing displacements of the paper 204 also produce simultaneous displacements of the typewriter ribbon 213.

- The principle of the invention has been described and exemplified by combinations of elements and mechanisms which are a satisfactory embodiment of the invention, but it is understood that this embodiment is merely illustrative and that the invention may be carried out in other ways.

I claim:

1. For use'in operative associationvith a telephone apparatus including a telephone, a switch to render the telephone operative to start a call and a device for manual transmittal of telephone numbers, an apparatus comprising driven means operative to move said device to automatically transmit a telephone number, driving means to automatically actuate said driven means and means cooperating with said switch to automatically start said driving means operating upon moving the switch to start a call.

2. For use in operative association with a telephone having a finger-wheel for manual dialing of telephone numbers, a receiver and a receiver hook, an automatictelephone number transmitting apparatus comprising means to 'dial the finger-wheel and means cooperating with said receiver hook to automatically start and stop said first-mentioned means operating respectively upon raising the receiver oft the hook to start; a call and upon automatic dialing of the finger-wheel.

3. For use in operative association with a telephone apparatus including a telephone and a device for transmittal of telephone numbers, an apparatus comprisingmeans operating said device to automatically transmit telephone numbers, and means cooperatingwith the first-mentioned means forrecording the characters of the called telephone numbers as the latter are transmitted.

4. For use in operative association with a telephone apparatus including a telephone, a

switch to render the telephone operative and inoperative to start and end a call and a de vice for manual transmittal of telephone numbers, an apparatus comprising means operating said device to automatically transmit recording the time at which the switch is moved to start a call and the time at which 3 the switch is moved to end a call.

5. An apparatus for attachment to a telephone having a device for manual transmittal of telephone numbers including a finger wheel, comprising means operating said device to transmit telephone numbers automatically, including an actuating finger adapted for 'quick connection to and disconnection from said'finger wheel whereby said numbertransmitting device may be renderedautomatically operable, on the one hand, and conditioned, on the other hand, to permit manual transmittal of telephone numbers;

6. An apparatus for attachment to a telephone having a finger-wheel for manual

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2416436 *Apr 22, 1944Feb 25, 1947Seeburg J P CorpMultiselective phonograph
US2426600 *May 19, 1942Sep 2, 1947Marcel DemeulenaereAutomatic dial operator
US2438848 *Apr 20, 1944Mar 30, 1948Seeburg J P CorpMultiselective phonograph
US2528161 *Nov 8, 1946Oct 31, 1950Bell Telephone Labor IncSignal code translator
US2579983 *Oct 6, 1949Dec 25, 1951Thornton Michael EApparatus for operating automatic telephones
US2615093 *Oct 21, 1949Oct 21, 1952Frank Weyrauch WilliamPhone call recorder
US2656417 *Nov 30, 1948Oct 20, 1953James Kilburg CorpAutomatic telephone dialer
US2674658 *May 9, 1951Apr 6, 1954West Austin WReceiver lifter and dial actuator
US2723314 *Aug 11, 1953Nov 8, 1955Vasselli Anthony JAutomatic telephone dialing device
US2999902 *Jul 12, 1956Sep 12, 1961Swartz Walter CAutomatic telephone dialer
US3095478 *Mar 25, 1960Jun 25, 1963Frontier Mfg CompanyTelephone alarm device
US3131260 *Mar 24, 1960Apr 28, 1964James EvansAutomatic alarm system
US3604856 *May 26, 1969Sep 14, 1971Lucas Industries LtdAutomatic dialing system for telephones
US5210788 *Mar 27, 1992May 11, 1993Nilssen Ole KTelephone instrument and distribution system
Classifications
U.S. Classification379/356.1, 379/441, 379/367
International ClassificationH04M1/274
Cooperative ClassificationH04M1/274
European ClassificationH04M1/274