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Publication numberUS1870751 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 9, 1932
Filing dateJan 7, 1931
Priority dateJan 7, 1931
Publication numberUS 1870751 A, US 1870751A, US-A-1870751, US1870751 A, US1870751A
InventorsReach Milton B
Original AssigneeSpalding & Bros Ag
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Golf shoe
US 1870751 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
Previous page
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Aug. 9, 1932.

M; B. REACH 1,870,751

GOLF SHOE Filed Jan. '7. 1931 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 Inuenl'br:

li'o n AB. Reach ,B M42140! WW Any-v.

Aug. 9, 1932. M R H 1,870,751

GOLF SHOE Filed Jan. 7. 1931 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 KM:- "iv"? w mm WW [mm 7 fnvpni'ar:

z'li'on B.Reach,

.B M fia v Patented Aug. '9, 1932 UNITED STATES,

PATIENT OIfFI'CE MILTON: B. REACH, OF. GHICOPEE, MASSACHIJ 'SETTS, ASSIGNOR TO A. G. SP ALDING G;

3303., OF NEW YORK, N. Y., A CORPORATION OF NEW JERSEY GOLF SHOE m ing midway between the shoes of the pair shown in Fig. 2.

Fig. 2 is a plan'view of the soles and heels with the upper and counters removed, the outline of the uppers being shown in dotted lines.

Fig. 3 is a cross section through the shoes at substantially the point where the ball of the foot lies, the view being taken from the rear and looking towards the toe of the shoes.

Fig.4 is an inner side view of the right shoe.

As is well known, it is important for the performance of a proper stroke that the feet of the player go through prescribed movements at the proper time and in proper sequence. In one part of the stroke the individual foot work should be characterized by stability or resistance to a rocking or lateral tilting action whereas in another part of the stroke the foot work should be characterized by mobility or freedom for lateral tilting or yielding action. These actions take place in a prescribed sequence in respect to first one foot and then the other.

In carrying out the invention I form the heel of the shoe at the outside of the shoe flaring downwardly and outwardly as at 1. This outward and downward inclination of the outer face of the heel is at the right side of the right heel and is continued a distance well around the back of the heel-so that what mav be termed the rear right back face of the right heel has this characteristic just mentioned of inclinin downwardly and outwardly.

In respect to the heel of the left shoe, the heel on its outer or left side is flared downward and outward and this flare is continued around the left heel at the rear. In both instances whether it be the right heel or the left heel this outward and downward inclination or flare of the outer side and of the rear face of the heel merges into an approximately vertical face at the inner side of the heel as shown at 2. This vertical inner face of :the

heel extends along the entire inner side of the heel. In respect to the sole of the shoe, the invention consists in making the outside edge portion at the outer side of the shoe at 3 so as to extend a substantial degree beyond the outer side 4 of the upper whereas in respect to the edge of the sole at the inner side of the shoe this, as shown at 5, is almost flush with the inner side 6 of the upper.

Furthermore, the edge of the sole at the outer side of the shoe is substantially rectangular in cross section as at 7 whereas the edge of the sole at the inner side of the shoe is rounded as at 8. This rounded shape of the edge begins at the toe of the shoe and extends to a point about midway of the lfength of the sole to about the ball of the In the use of these shoes it will be understood that on the backward swing of the club and during the swaying of'the player towards the right the right foot will be braced against lateral outward rocking movement by the extended part of the sole at the outer side or right side of said foot and by the rightward broadened heel resulting from the outward and downward flare ofsaid heel and as the weight shifts to the rearward part of the foot, at the top of the swing. the rearward broadened heel formation will sustain the thrust against the tendency to rock and thus the maintenance of the equilibrium of the player will be materially aided. On this rearward stroke a different effect, from that just described in respect to the right foot, takes place in relation to the left foot because here it is desired to facilitate an easy rocking or pivoting movement of the left and the left side of the body follows the backward stroke.

'On the downward stroke and the follow through the substantially flush rounded edge at the inner side of the right foot and the substantially vertical formation of the heel contribute to the easy tilting or pivoting action of the right foot in an inward or leftward direction. As to the left foot, however, a bracing effect takes place along the outer side of the shoe due to the broadened square edged sole and the outward flared heel formation. this aidin the player in sustaining himself as the swing of the club continues towards the left, and as the pivot action is completed the left foot turns on the heel and the toe gradually points towards the direction of flight.

While these shoes are primarily designed for the full shot, Wood or iron, there is nothing in their design that would detrimentally influence any of the positions that the feet assume in the varied shots to the green as the shots become shorter. On uphill and downhill lies the shape of sole and heel contribute stability to the particular stance required for those lies.

In addition to the heel formation above described, I so form the bottom face of the heel that it will slope upwardly from the edge at the outer side of the heel to the edge at the inner side of the heel. In other words, for the right heel the slope of the bottom face would be upwardly from the right side edge to the left side edge of the heel, whereas for the left heel the slope would be from the left side edge to the right side edge.

In other words,-the heel is higher on the outside edge than on the inside edge. This formation adds to the bracing effect at the right foot against the up-swing, and so far as the left foot is concerned, this is additionally braced by this inclined heel face, at the time of impact, against the tendency of the heel to roll over on the outer edge.

In connection with this heel, I use a scored flexible shank connecting the heel to the sole in a manner similar to that shown in patent of the7United States No. 1,242,233 dated Oct. 9, 191

By means of this flexible shank the sole and heel adjust themselves relative to each other.

' I claim:

1. A golf shoe having a sole substantially flush with the upper along the inner side of the shoe which edge is rounded in cross section, the edge of said sole along the outer side of the shoe extending laterally beyond the vertical plane of the side of said upper and being of rectangular cross section, substantially as described.

2. A golf shoe comprising a heel flared on its outer side face downwardly and outwardly and having a substantially vertical face on the inner side, a sole having a rounded edge along the inner side of the shoe substantially in the same vertical lane with the side of the upper and having its opposite edge extending laterally beyond the vertical plane of the side of the upper, said extended edge being rectangular in cross section, and a scored flexible shank connecting the sole and heel, substantially as described.

3. A golf shoe having a heel, the face along the outer side thereof inclining downwardly and outwardly and the face along the inner side being substantially vertical and flush with the upper, and a sole portion extending laterally beyond the upper along the outer side of the shoe, said extended edge being substantially rectangular in cross section and the edge of the sole along the inner side of the shoe and in the region of the ball of the foot being substantially flush with the upper and rounded, substantially as described.

In testimony whereof, I aflix my signature.

MILTON B. REACH.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3732634 *Sep 9, 1971May 15, 1973Kayser Roth CorpShoe construction
US4468870 *Jan 24, 1983Sep 4, 1984Sternberg Joseph EBowling shoe
US4524531 *Dec 2, 1982Jun 25, 1985Vanderipe Donald RGolf shoes
US4638579 *Nov 27, 1985Jan 27, 1987Kangaroos U.S.A., Inc.Pocketed athletic shoe
US4738262 *Feb 27, 1987Apr 19, 1988Zebrack Samuel DTherapeutic weight dispersing shoe sole
US4790083 *Nov 17, 1986Dec 13, 1988Salomon S.A.Golf shoe
US4885851 *Dec 30, 1987Dec 12, 1989Tretorn AbShoesole for golf shoe
US5265354 *Nov 25, 1991Nov 30, 1993Aliano Jr Joseph FGolf shoe insert
US6115945 *Dec 3, 1993Sep 12, 2000Anatomic Research, Inc.Shoe sole structures with deformation sipes
US6138386 *Jan 22, 1999Oct 31, 2000Spalding Sports Worldwide, Inc.Composite cleat for athletic shoe
US6381878Oct 31, 2000May 7, 2002Spalding Sports Worldwide, Inc.Composite cleat for athletic shoe
US6405458Jun 9, 2000Jun 18, 2002Floyd W. FleshmanInfant training shoes and method of using same
US6457976Feb 8, 2002Oct 1, 2002Floyd W. FleshmanInfant training shoes and method of using same
US6591519Jul 19, 2001Jul 15, 2003Anatomic Research, Inc.Shoe sole structures
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US6668470Jul 20, 2001Dec 30, 2003Anatomic Research, Inc.Shoe sole with rounded inner and outer side surfaces
US6694647 *May 26, 1999Feb 24, 2004Etonic Worldwide LlcBio-mechanically extended heel for golf shoe
US6708424Aug 28, 2000Mar 23, 2004Anatomic Research, Inc.Shoe with naturally contoured sole
US6729046Oct 12, 2001May 4, 2004Anatomic Research, Inc.Shoe sole structures
US6748674Nov 6, 2002Jun 15, 2004Anatomic Research, Inc.Shoe sole structures using a theoretically ideal stability plane
US6763616Aug 22, 2001Jul 20, 2004Anatomic Research, Inc.Shoe sole structures
US6877254Nov 13, 2002Apr 12, 2005Anatomic Research, Inc.Corrective shoe sole structures using a contour greater than the theoretically ideal stability plane
US7082697Jun 7, 2004Aug 1, 2006Anatomic Research, Inc.Shoe sole structures using a theoretically ideal stability plane
US7093379Nov 8, 2002Aug 22, 2006Anatomic Research, Inc.Shoe sole with rounded inner and outer side surfaces
US7127834Apr 11, 2003Oct 31, 2006Anatomic Research, Inc.Shoe sole structures using a theoretically ideal stability plane
US7168185Oct 22, 2003Jan 30, 2007Anatomic Research, Inc.Shoes sole structures
US7287341Aug 19, 2004Oct 30, 2007Anatomic Research, Inc.Corrective shoe sole structures using a contour greater than the theoretically ideal stability plane
US8776402 *May 6, 2013Jul 15, 2014Rtc3 LlcAnkle inversion and eversion prevention shoe
US20130139406 *Dec 5, 2011Jun 6, 2013Shei Chung Hsin Ind. Co., Ltd.Stabilizer Boots
US20130245525 *May 6, 2013Sep 19, 2013Ronnie E. Cromer, JR.Ankle inversion and eversion prevention shoe
WO1987007480A1 *Jun 5, 1987Dec 17, 1987Boots & Boats IncGolf shoes
Classifications
U.S. Classification36/127, 12/146.00C, 36/25.00R, 36/34.00R, 36/59.00R
International ClassificationA43B5/00
Cooperative ClassificationA43B5/001
European ClassificationA43B5/00B