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Publication numberUS1871702 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 16, 1932
Filing dateJul 23, 1930
Priority dateJul 23, 1930
Publication numberUS 1871702 A, US 1871702A, US-A-1871702, US1871702 A, US1871702A
InventorsCharles Robert F, Kallander Ernest L
Original AssigneeDennison Mfg Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Parchmentized crepe paper and method of making
US 1871702 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

g- 1932- E. L. KALLANDER ET AL 1,871,702

IARCHMENTIZED CREPE PAPER AND METHOD OF MAKING Filed July 23, 1930 desired.

Patented Aug. 6, 1932 UNITED STATES PA-TENT OFFICE nniznsr L. KALLANDER, or rnammenm, AND ROBERT- F. ommnns, or CONCORD,

MASSACHUSETTS, ASSIGNORS TO DENNISON MANUFACTURING COMPANY, OF

FRAMING-HAM, MASSACHUSETTS, A CORPORATION OF MASSACHUSETTS PARCHMENTIZED CREPE PAPER AND METHOD OF MAKING Application filed Ju1y 23, 1930. Serial No. 469,977.

This invention relates to crepe paper and provides a method of preparing the same and at the same time imparting special proptured paper to which an adhesive creping solution hasbeen applied, followed by pass-v ing it over a creping roll and creping it there- 10 from by the scraping action of a doctor blade.

Such papers are widely used for decorative purposes in which their softness of texture is highly desirable, permitting them to be shaped readily in whatever way may be For special purposes, however, it is desirable to have a smooth finish upon one side of the creped paper, to resist wetting or to prevent adhesion of other surfaces thereto. .This is particularly the case with crepe papers to-which an adhesive has been applied and which is to be rolled or folded together for storage prior to actual use,as with the tacky adhesive crepe paper or painters tape disclosed in our copending application Serial No. 469,976, filed July 23, 1930, for example.

This paper is provide d with a non-hardening adhesive, whlch remains tacky but cohesive.

and may bereadily attached to surfaces to '30 protect the same and at the same time may be readily and "completely stripped therefrom hen desired. Nevertheless, when such ,paper is to be folded or rolled up for an appreciable length of time before use it is desirable to render the. uncoated side more positively resistant to permanent adhesion to'the coated surface. I

An object of the present invention, therefore, is to provide a crepe paper which shall be relatively flexible and elastic and which shall be substant ally resistant to wetting by water or the softening action of other liquids such as 011, grease, etc. It is also an object to provide a smooth surface thereon which shall prevent appreciable adhesion upon contact with tacky substances. It may be a further ob ect to leave an untreated surface which shall retain the usual soft-textured appearance and feel, or rough readily wetted fibrous structure and other characteristics of-the untreated paper, as for painters tape and the like. Other objects will appear from the following description.

. The method of the invention includes in general the application of a parchmeiitizing solution .such as sulfuric acid, zinc chloride, or the like, of a suitable concentration to one surface of the sheet of paper to be used, permitting the solution to react upon and soften the paper sheet for a definite period of time,

neutralizing the same, washing to remove the residues of such reagent materials, and then, either with or without the supplemental addition of a creping solution to the sheet, passing the same to a creping drum (preferably. with the treated surface incontact with the creping roll if no creping solution is to be employed) and finally creping the sheet from the roll by contact with a suitably adjusted doctor blade. The creped sheet is then dried and may be rolled up for use, per se, or subjected to further treatment,-such as the application of an adhesive coating thereto, as more fully described in the copending application for patent referred to above.

The resulting sheet is characterized by having a firm, resilient elastic structure, relatively resistantto water and also to the penetration and reaction of chemical reagents generally, on one side-and a soft textured, rough or fibrous readily wetted and penetrable surface, integral therewith, on the other side.

of the parchmentizing treatment, a softer or looser textured paper than is ordinarily suitable for subjecting to the creping operation may be employed and will produce a finished sheet of adequate strength. Again, the soft side of the sheet may be treated, as by dyeing, etc., or coated with an adhesive composition (as in the copending application already mentioned), and the finished sheet may be rolled or piled without serious adhesion. I On the contrary, the sheets may be rolled up stored and later unrolled and leave none 0 the adhesive upon the finished or uncoated surface. 7

An example of the invention will be described with respect to its application to a light weight kraft paper sheet, to produce a creped sheet suitable for use in the prepara tion of a painters tape. Suitable apparatus is shown in the accompanying. drawing, in

which the figure is a diagrammatic side elevation.

In operation of the process with the equipment illustrated, a sheet of light weight, soft textured kraft paper 1, is drawn from the roll which thoroughly wets the entire surface. It

may not penetrate deepl or pass through the sheet, however, inasmuch as the action of the sulfuric acid u on the fibers and intervening cellulosic matrlx of the sheetisto cause the same rapidly to swell and thus to resist further penetration. Hence the depth of the parchmentizing effect may be controlled and limited substantially to the entrant or treated sideof the paper sheetor it may be such as to penetrate deeply,or even completely through the sheet (by wetting both sides) in order to obtain special eifects, such as an increased or maximum stiffness or water resistance in the finished creped sheet,

The treated sheet 1, with the .parchmentizing solution now on its upper surface passes to the belt conveyor 8 which is of such length and operated at such speed as to allow sufficient time for the desired reaction oft-he solution upon the paper sheet. In the instant case, for example, approximately 15 seconds may be recommended. The sheet then passes over. and under guide rollers 10 and 11, re-

spectively, through a neutralizing solution 12 of caustic soda or the like in tank 13, and

thence through squeeze rolls 1% and thence over and under similarguides 15, 16 through a water bath 17 in tank 18. The wet sheet may now be passed between squeeze rolls 1-9 to remove excess water and over apreliminary drying drum 20, guided by rolls 21, and thence. through a crepingbath or be sprayed .orotherwise covered with adhesive as by an overhead spray 22. 'But, owing to the parchmentized or gelatinized surface of the paper sheet, it is relatively plastic and adhesive, perse, which facilitates adhes on tothe creping. drum 23, against which it is firmly pressed bythe roller 24:. The drum may be heated according to customary practice, or

this may be dispensed with, as required by g the other conditons of the process. The sheet is 'next crinkled or creped and removed from the creping roll by contact with the doctor blade 25 and the creped sheet removed,

' ing so preferably upon a belt conveyor 26-.which permits. it to dry further. At this point the paper may be embossed or crinkled (e. g. transversely of the creping) if desired and .then conducted about a drylng drum 27 and held in contact therewith as by means ofa. flexible belt. 28, from wlich-it is delivered paper of high crepe ratiothat is, in which the ratio of the length of a sheet of'crepe paper which has been stretched to the length of the sheet before stretching is relatively large. For example, a crepe ratio may be obtained of 1.3 to 2.5 'or even higher.

We claim: I

1. Methodof making crepe paper, comprisilgg the steps of applying a parchmentizing s lution to a sheet of paper and subsequently creping the sheet. i

2. Method of making crepe paper, comprisin thesteps of applying a' parchmentizlution to a sheet of paper, removing residual traces of the parchmentizing solution, and creping the sheet.

' 3. Method of making crepe paper, comprising the steps of applying a parchmentizing solution to a sheet of paper, neutra izing and removing residual traces of the parchmentizing solution, and creping the sheet.

4. Method of making crepe paper, comprising the steps of applying to one side of a sheet of paper a layer of parchmentizing solution, and subsequently creping the sheet from the thus treated surface.

5. Method of making crepe paper, comprising the steps of applying to one side of a sheet of paper a layer of parchmentizing solution, removing residual traces of the parchmentizing solution, and subsequently greping the sheet from the thus treated surace.

6. Method of making crepe paper, comprising the steps of applying to one side of a sheet of paper a layer of parchmentizing solution, neutralizing and removing residual traces of the parchmentizing solution and subsequently creping the sheet from the thus treated surface.

7. Method of making crepe paper comprising the steps of applying a parchmentizing solution to a sheet of paper and creping the sheet while in softened condition.

8, Method of making crepe paper comprising the steps of applying a parchmentizing solution to a sheet ofpaper, removing the parchmentizing solution and creping the-'- cl-oping the sheet there from.

"side of the sheet, applying the thus softened 11. Method of making crepe paper, com-' prising thesteps of applying a parchmentizing solution to a sheet of paper, regulating the reactive effect of the same to soften one "surface to a'solid surface, andcreplng and ei'nbossi mg the sheet.

12. A sheet of crepe paper, characterized by having a parchmentized surface.

18. A sheet of crepe paper, characterized by having a parchmentizedsurface and an i1nparuhmentized surface.

1-1. A sheet of crepe paper, characterized by having a parchmentized surface and emhossi n g thereon.

15. A sheet of crepe paper characterizedby having a smooth, parchm'entized surface, and unparchmentized surface and emhossing thereon.

16. A sheet of crepe paper characterized by he ring a smooth, pa'rchmentized surface an a (me crepe structure,

Signed by us at Framingham, Massa-- chusetts this fifteenth day of July 1930.

. ERNEST L. KALLANDER.

ROBERT F. CHARLES.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2475241 *Feb 1, 1945Jul 5, 1949Hermanson William AHeat sealed bag
US2493267 *Jul 24, 1944Jan 3, 1950Scholl William MMounting and mounting assembly for adhesived articles
US2647297 *Jul 10, 1948Aug 4, 1953American Viscose CorpCockled fibrous product of the nonwoven fabric type and method of making it
US2834703 *Feb 26, 1954May 13, 1958Personal Products CorpTissue-faced cotton squares
US3014832 *Feb 12, 1957Dec 26, 1961Kimberly Clark CoMethod of fabricating tissue
US4272580 *Jan 31, 1980Jun 9, 1981Zepeda Bermudez Rocio S DeDecorative parchment paper
US4285764 *Apr 9, 1979Aug 25, 1981Beloit CorporationMethod and apparatus for producing corrugated combined board
US5980673 *Mar 4, 1998Nov 9, 1999Uni-Charm CorporationWiping sheet and method for producing the same
US9079452Dec 9, 2013Jul 14, 2015Wilsonart LlcDecorative laminate and method for manufacturing same
WO2014093235A1 *Dec 9, 2013Jun 19, 2014Wilsonart LlcDecorative laminate and method for manufacturing same
Classifications
U.S. Classification428/153, 428/163, 427/361, 156/76, 156/183
Cooperative ClassificationD21H27/06, D21H5/08
European ClassificationD21H27/06, D21H5/08