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Publication numberUS1872462 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 16, 1932
Filing dateSep 26, 1928
Priority dateSep 26, 1928
Publication numberUS 1872462 A, US 1872462A, US-A-1872462, US1872462 A, US1872462A
InventorsHarvey L Johnson, John E Treanor
Original AssigneeHarvey L Johnson, John E Treanor
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Pressure booster tank for carbonating systems
US 1872462 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Aug. 16, 1932. H. L.JOHNSON EQT AL 1,872}462 PRESSURE BOOSTER TANK FOR CARBONATING SYSTEMS- Filed Sept. 26, 1928 5 Sheets-Sheet l 1 [1V raw-02s.-

/ Harvey l/finson,

fil/aAn ff Rea/w);

Aug, 16, 1932 H1... JOHNSON ETAL 1,372,452

PRESSURE BOOSTER TANK FOR CARBONATING SYSTEMS 3 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed Sept. 26. 1928 f/vns/vraes; f/ar ugy L. l/a/msan, 1 560 f. Fae/m);

g- 1932. ML. JOHNSON ET AL 1,872,462

PRESSURE BOOSTER TANK FOR CARBONATING SYSTEMS Filed Sept. 26, 19 28 3 Sheets-Sheet IIIIHIII A TTUE/VE Y Patented Aug. 16, 1932 UNITED STATES PATENT -OFFICE.

PRESSURE BOOSTER TANK FOB CABBONATING SYSTEMS.

Application filed September 26, 1928. Serial No. 308,564.

Our invention relates to a carbonating apparatus, and more particularly to a novel tank for use on an apparatus for carbonating water.

In carbonatingwater it is customary to introduce water into an atmosphere of carbon dioxide gas. Such a carbonating process is ordinarily performed by batch methods. In other words, a whole tank of water is carbonated and is then connected to a dispensing apparatus under pressure. It is much more satisfactory from various angles to carbonate the water only as fast as it is used by the dispensing apparatus.

Such a carbonating apparatus is disclosed in an application for United States Letters Patent entitled Carbonating apparatus invented by John E. Treanor, filed June 16, 1925, Serial No. 37 ,584. Our present invention relates to a reservoir tank adapted to automatically supply water under pressure to such a carbonating apparatus, although it is not limited to this use.

It is an object of our invention to provide a reservoir tank adapted to supply a liquid under pressure either continuously or intermittently to an auxiliary apparatus, such, for instance, as a continuous carbonating apparatus.

The piping used in soda fountains is usual- 1y quite weak in tensile strength. Thus it becomes necessary to limit the maximum pressure therein. In carbonating water only 4 in suflicient quantities to meet the emand of the dispensing apparatus, it becomes necessary to have some sort of a pressure pump which is intermittently operated. lVhen the prime mover of such a pump is de-energized the momentum of the moving parts is often sufficient to continue the pumping action beyond the instant of de-energiza'tion and this action often builds up excessive pressure in the piping.

It is an object of our invention to provide a reservoir tank which will compensate for any pressure that may develop after the pump prime mover is de-energized. 3

- We have also found it advantageous to supply to the carbonating apparatus water which has already been slightly carbonated.

66 of Fig. 5.

This pre-carbonization may easily be efiect ed when using our reservoir tank, and it is accordingly an object of our invention to provide a reservoir tank which will pre-carbonate the water supplied to a carbonating I5 apparatus.

Otherbbjects and advantages of our inventi on will be made evident hereinafter.

In the drawings, W e-diagrammatically illustrate a preferred embodiment of our invention. In these drawings,

Fig. 1 is a diagrammatic view illustrating our tank in conjunction with a suitable carbonating apparatus.

Fig. 2 is a cross-sectional view taken on the 66 line 2-2 of Fig. 1.

Fig. 3 is a sectional view of our invention when the mechanism is in a different position from that shown in Fig. 1.

Fig. 4 is a cross-sectlonal view taken on the line 4-4 of Fig. 1.

Fig. 5 is an enlarged view of one form of float-operated valve.

Fig. 6 is a sectional view taken on the line Fig. 7 is a view similar to Fig. 1 showing another form of our invention.

Fig. 8 is a section taken on theline 8-8 of. Fig- 7- g. Y

Referring to Fig. 1, we show a carbonating I apparatus 10 which is adapted to receive water through a supply pipe 11 and carbon dioxide gas through a pipe 12. This gas is absorbed by the water entering the supply pipe 11, and the carbonated water forme 18 8| transmitted through a pipe 13 to a suitable dispensing apparatus 14. The carbonating apparatus 10 is preferably ofthe t which carbonates the water only in suflicient quantities to meet the demand of the dispensing apparatus 14. Thus, the water entering thecarbonating apparatus through the supply pipe 11 must flow intermittently.

Adapted to supply water to the' ipe 11 is a reservoir tank 20 incorporating t e features of our invention. The tank 20 comprises a shell 21 closed-at its upper and lower ends by upper and lower plates 22 and 23 respectively. The interior of the shell 21 is adapt- I ed to hold a body of water 25 in the lower portion thereof, this portion being designated by Sid - lower/end thereof is adapted to be closed by a float-operated valve 30. As best shown in Figs. 1 and 5, this valve has an arm 33 which is bent at right angles and which holds at its upper end a cup 34 in which a washer 35 is positioned, this washer being adapted to close the lower end of the pipe 28. The arm 33 is pivoted to a collar 37, as indicated at 38.

This collar is suitably secured to an outlet pipe which communicates with the supply pipe 11 and extends downward in the shell 21 to a point near the lower plate 23. Thus, the lower end of this pipe is submerged below the surface of the water 25.

The arm "33extends inward from the pivot point 38 and is pivoted to a suitable float 43. Thisfloat may be of any desired type, but in the form shown in Figs. 1 and 3 it comprises a corrugated closure 44 which is air-tight. The float-operated valve 30 is thus adapted to be closed when the level of the water 25 is sufficiently lowered so that the float is not supported by the buoyancy of the water. At this 1 time the weight of the float 43 causes the valve 30 to assume its full line position shown in Figs. 1 and 5, thus preventing any gas from entering the gas chamber 27 through the pipe 28. lVhen the surface of the water 25 rises,

the float 43 will assume a position indicated in Fig. 3, thus opening the valve 30 and allowing gas to enter the gas chamber 27. The uppermost position of the float 43 is controlled by a stop 45 against which the arm 33 bears.

Adapted to supply water to the interior of the reservoir tank 20 is a pipe having a nozzle 51 thereon. This nozzle is directed in a. vertical position so as to spraythe water passing through the pipe 50 against a deflector 52 which breaks up the nozzle stream lnto small particles and distributes these particles throughout the gas chamber 27.

Vatcr is forced through the pipe 50 by means of a pump 55 which may be of any desired type. In the form shown in Fig. 1, we have 'shown this pump as a centrifugal pump operated by a motor 56, the operation of this motor being controlled by .a pressure-operated switch 58 which is connected to the pipe 50 bya coupling59 and which is controlled by the pressure in the pipe 50. The pressureoperated switch 58 may be of any desired type which will energize the motor 56 when the pressure in the pipe 50 or the tank 20 falls below "a minimum value. At this time the pump forces water through the pipe 50 and into the tank 20 until the pressure therein reaches a pre-determined maximum value,

at which time the pressure-operated switch 58 deenergizes the motor 56.

One type of switch which may be advantageously utilized for this purpose is known as a mercoid switch which has a pair of terminals at an inner end of a suitable tube. These terminals may be short-circuited by a body of mercury when this mercury is allowed to rest in the terminal end of the tube. The tube is pivotedand also connected to a diaphragm so that the position of the mercury in the tube is determined by the pivoting relation of the mercoid tube. Thus the circuit through the terminals is controlled by the pressure on the diaphragm, this pressure being that in the pipe 50. IVith certain types of pumps it may be necessary to install acheck valve in the coupling 59, this valve being closed when the pump 55 is not in operation, but being opened during the operation thereof.

In operating our invention the pipe 28 is connected to a source of carbon dioxide gas. This gas is usually under quite a high pressure and the float-operated valve 30 must be designed to hold back this pressure. The pressure-operated switch 58 is then set so that the pump 55 is operated between maximum and minimum pressures, these pressures being lower than the pressure of the carbon dioxide gas.. For purposes of illustration we shall assume definite values of pressure. Thus in a practical illustration the carbon dioxide gas may be at a pressure of one hundred pounds per square inch, while the maximum and minimum pressures at which the pump 55 stops and starts may be taken as seventy and fifty pounds per square inch respectively.

In operating our invention, the gas chamber 27 is vented to the atmosphere through a vent closed by a valve 66. This valve is opened and water is forced into the tank 20, as indicated in Fig. 1. When the level of this Lil water rises to the point indicated by the numeral 67 of Fig. 3, the float-operated valve 30 will open and the carbon dioxide gas will enter the gas chamber 27. The valve 66 is then closed and the gas passing through the pipe 28 quickly builds up a pressure in the gas chamber 27. WVhen this pressure reaches the maximum pressure to which the switch 58 has been set, seventy pounds per square inch inthis illustration, this switch will operate to deenergize the motor 56 and thus stop the pump 55. The pressure in the gas chamber 27 will,-however, continue to rise until equal to the pressure of the source of carbon dioxide, in this instance onehundred pounds per square inch.

As carbonated water is drawn from the dis- 1 carbonating apparatus 10 in suflicient quantities to meet the demand. This withdrawal ing the of water lowers the level thereof to a. int indicated b" the numeral 80 of Fig. 1, t us closoat-operated valve 30. At this in stant the pressure inside the gas chamber 27 is still one hundred pounds per square inch. As still more water is utilized the water level will continue to lower and the pressure in the gas chamber 27 will correspondingly decrease until this pressure has reached the minimum value to which the pressure-operated switch 58 has been set, in this instance fifty pounds per square inch. The switch 58 will then start the pump and will pump water into the tank 20 until a pressure of seventy pounds per square inch is built up inthe gas chamber 27, at which time the switch 58 will automatically stop the operation of the pump Ordinarily this pressure of seventy pounds per square inch will not be built up until the valve 30 is opened by means of the float 43, this float then holding the valve open until sufiicient water has been withdrawn to close it.

The body of gas in the gas chamber 27 acts as a cushion to absorb any excess surge of water which might be delivered by the pump 55 after the motor 56 is deenergized due to the momentum of the moving parts. This resilient action prevents damage to the piping extending to the dispensing apparatus 14.

By utilizing carbonv dioxide as the gas, and water as the liquid passing through the pipe 50, we accomplish a preliminary carbonization in the reservoir tank 20 which is desirable. This carbonization takes place due to the water being impinged on the deflector 52. and being sprayed downward in small droplets through the carbon dioxide gas, this gas being'absorbed to a certain extent thereby. Thus the water passing through the outlet pipe 40 and the supply plpe 11 is par tially carbonated.

In Figs. 7 and 8 an alternative form of the invention is illustrated. In this second form of the invention we provide a diflerent type of float-operated valve-which at the present 1 time we believe is superior to that disclosed in Figs. 1 to 6 inclusive.

Referring particularly to Figs. 7 and 8,: it will be notedthat the gas inlet pipe 28 is extended downward and is provided with a horizontal portion 80 which is directed toward the central vertical axis of the tank 20.

Extending upward from the horizontal portion 80 is an upright portion 81. The upright portion 81 is slightly off-set from the vertical axis of the tank 20 in order that the float 43 may operate at one side of the pipes 28 and 40.

In this form of the invention the float 43 is provided with a central tube 83 which provides a chamber into which the upright portion 81 is extended. The upper end of the-tube 83 is located above the top of the float :43, and is provided with a valve closure 84. Openings 85 are formed in the upper end of the tube 83 above the float 43. The upper end of the upright portion 81 is provided in the form of a nozzle 86 adapted to be engaged by the valve closure 84 in order to prevent gas from entering the tank 20 through .the pipe 28.

For the purpose of guiding the float 43 theupright portion 81 is provided with upper and lower guides 87. which have a sliding contact with the interior wall of the tube 83. It will be seen from an inspection of Fig. 7 that the float 43 is free to slide up or down, and is maintained in such positions that the closure-84 will always properly engage the nozzle 85.

The operation'of this form of the invention is like that of the first form of the invention. When the liquid level in the tank 20 rises,- the closure 84 is disengaged from the nozzle 86 and gas is allowed to pass into the upper end of the tube 83 and into the interior 0 the tank 20 through the openings 85. When the liquid level is forced downward by-the gas pressure, the float 43 depresses the closure and engages the nozzle 86, thus shutting off the supply of gas.

'While vwe have particularly described the reservoir tank as applicable to a carbonating'apparatus, it should be understood that we are not limited to this use. Our reservoir tank finds utility in various other arts where it is desirable to supply a liquid under pressure, either continuously or intermittently, to a device for utilizing this liquid.

We claim as our invention:

1. In areservoir tank adapted to supply a liquid upon demand, the combination of: a tank, the lower portion of said tank being filled with a liquid; an outlet pipe extending below the surface of said liqud; a float-operated gas inlet valve, said valve being opened when said liquid surface rises; a pump for supplying liquid to said tank; and means for filled with a liquid; an outlet pipe extending below the surface of said liquid; a gas pipe extending into said tank; a float in said tank, said float being guided by said gas pipe; a fioat-operated'gas inlet valve opened by said float when the liquid level rises; and means for supplying liquid t said tank.

4. In a reservoir tank adapted to supply a liquid on demand, the combination of: a tank. the lower portion of said tank being filled with a liquid; an outlet pipe extending below the surface of said liquid; a gas pipe extending into said tank, said gas pipe having an uprightportion; a float in said tank, said float surrounding said upright portion and thus being guided by said gas pipe; a floatoperated gas inlet valve opened by said float when the liquid level rises; and means for supplying liquid to said tank.

5. In a reservoir tank adapted to supply a liquid on demand, the Combination of: a tank, the lower portion of said tank being filled with a liquid; an outlet pipe extending below the surface of said liquid; a gas pipe extending into said tank; a fioat in said tank, said float being guided by said gas pipe; a nozzle carried by said gas pipe; a closure carried by said float, said closure being disengaged from said. nozzle when said float is raised by the rising of the liquid level; and means for supplying liquid to said tank.

6. In a reservoir tank adapted to supply a liquid upon demand, the combination of: a tank adapted to be partially filled with a liquid; an outlet pipe extending below the surface of said liquid; a float-operated gas inlet valve adapted to supply gas to the upper portion of said tank when said liquid has reached a predetermined level in said tank; a ump for supplying liquid to said tank; and means for starting said pump when the pressure in said tank reaches a set minimum value, and stopping said pump when the pressure in said tank builds up to a maximum value.

7 In a reservoir tank adapted to supply a liquid upon demand, the combination of: a.

tank adapted to be partially filled with a liquid; an outletpipe extending below the surface of said liquid; a float-operated gas inlet valve adapted to supply gas to the upper portion of said tank when said liquid has reached a predetermined level in said tank; a pump for supplying liquid to said tank;

and means for starting said pump when the pressure in said tank reaches a set minimum value, and stopping said pump when the pressure in said tank builds up to a maximum value, said valuesof pressure being less than the pressure of said gas.

' 8. A reservoir for carbonated water dispensing devices comprising: a tank containing a body of water; an outlet pipe extending below the surface of said water; a float-operated gas inlet valve, said valve adapted to supply a gas to the upper portion of said tank; a pump adapted to supply water to said tank, said valve being opened when said water surface rises; and means for starting said pump when the pressure in said tank reaches a set minimum value, and stopping said pump when the pressure in said tank builds vup to a maximum value. 1

9. In a reservoir tank adapted to supply.

a liquid upon demand, the combination of: a tank adaptedto hold liquid in the lower portion thereof; a liquid outlet pipe extending below the surface of said liquid; a gas inlet pipe extending upwardly into the upper portion of said tank; a float-operated valve operable along said gas inlet pipe, said valve being opened when said liquid surface rises; and means actuated when the pressure in said tank reaches a set minimum value for supplying liquid to said tank and for shutting off said liquid supply when the pressure in'said tank builds up to a maximum value. 10. In a reservoir tank adapted to supply a liquid upon demand, the combination of: a tank adapted to. hold liquid in the lower portion thereof; a liquid outlet pipe extending' below the surface of said liquid; a gas supply pipe extending. upwardly through the lower portion of said tank; a float-operated valve slidable on said gas supply pipe, said-valve being opened when said liquid surface rises; and liquid supply means actuated when the pressure in said tank reaches a minimum value, and stopped when the pressure builds up to a maximum value, said maximum and minimum values of pressure being less than the pressure of said gas.

11. In a pressure booster apparatus of the class described, the combination of: a closed reservoir; liquid supply means for supplying liquid to said reservoir; gas supply means for supplying gas to said reservoir; gas control means for controlling the admission of gas to said reservoir in accordance with the amount of liquid contained therein; pressure-responsive means for controlling the operation of said liquid supply means in accordance with the pressure in said reservoir; and withdrawal means'for said reservoir.

12. In a pressure booster apparatus of'the' class described, the combination of: a closed reservoir; liquid supply means for supplying liquid to said reservoir; gas supply'means for supplying gas to said reservoir; gas control means for controlling the admission of gas to said reservoir in accordance with the amount or" liquid contained therein; pressure-responsive means for controllin the operation of said liquid supply means in accordance with the pressure in said reservoir; mixing means for causing a mixture of said liquid and said gas; and withdrawal means for said reservoir.

In testimony whereof, we have hereunto

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2613922 *Jan 13, 1950Oct 14, 1952Gatchet Francis LSolution mixing and distributing apparatus
US2660360 *Sep 17, 1949Nov 24, 1953Meyer Geo J Mfg CoMethod and apparatus to supply a beverage to a filling machine and fill containers thereby
US3102799 *Jun 20, 1960Sep 3, 1963Carl Kiekhaefer ElmerResidential water storing and supply apparatus
US4271097 *Sep 20, 1979Jun 2, 1981Bruce GarrardGas and liquid ad-mixing system
US4313897 *Jan 30, 1980Feb 2, 1982Bruce GarrardGas and liquid admixing system
US4850269 *Jun 26, 1987Jul 25, 1989Aquatec, Inc.Low pressure, high efficiency carbonator and method
US4859376 *Jun 26, 1987Aug 22, 1989AquatecGas-driven carbonator and method
US4940164 *Jun 26, 1987Jul 10, 1990AquatecDrink dispenser and method of preparation
US5002201 *Sep 14, 1988Mar 26, 1991Aquatec Inc.Bottled water cooler apparatus and method
Classifications
U.S. Classification261/27, 261/DIG.700
International ClassificationB01F3/04
Cooperative ClassificationB01F3/04808, Y10S261/07
European ClassificationB01F3/04C8G