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Publication numberUS1872641 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 16, 1932
Filing dateApr 18, 1930
Priority dateApr 18, 1930
Publication numberUS 1872641 A, US 1872641A, US-A-1872641, US1872641 A, US1872641A
InventorsSalvatore Capezio
Original AssigneeSalvatore Capezio
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Ballet slipper and manufacture of same
US 1872641 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Aug. 16, 1932. v I s. CAPEZIO 1,872,641

' BALLET SLIPPER AND MANUFACTURE OF ME Filed April 18, 1930 4 Sheets-Sheet l INVENTOR salvafore Capezm ATTORNEYS 1932- s. CAPEZIO BALLET SLIPPER AND MANUFACTURE OF SAME Filed April 18. 19:50

4 Shgts-Sheet 2 INVENTOR Sq lvafore Co eziO g BY ATTQRNEYS Aug. 16, 1932. s. CAPEZIO BALLET SLIPPER AND MANUFACTURE OF SAME Filed April 18, 1930 4 Sheets-Sheet 3 Tic. 11.

INVENTOR salvcfiore Capeiao ATTORNEYS Aug. 16, 1932. s. CAPEZIO 1,372,641

BALLET. SLIPPER AND MANUFACTURE OF SAME Filed April 18, 1930 4 Sheets-Sheet 4 INVENTOR sqlvaiore Capezio BY ll atented Aug. 1,, 1932 UNE BALLET smrrnn AND if r Application filed April 18,

This invention relates to ballet slippers and to a method for manufacturing the same.

The upper of an ordinary ballet slipper is made of a fabric such as satin which rapidly wears and frays at the toe of the slipper, making it necessary to. discard the same after relatively short useful life. With a view to increasing the wear of these slippers it has been proposed to form at'the toe and sole adto jacent the toe a solid mass of stitching which is capable of taking the wear. Such a slipper is disclosed in my Patent 1,704,281 issued March 5, 1929, and is eminently satisfactory in use, but it costly to manufacture and must it be marketed at a relatively high price because of the expense ofstitching the toe portion of the slipper with the numerous necessary lines of stitching.

One object of the present invention is to rovide a ballet slipper capable of long wear, and a method for making the same which will permit it to be marketed at a low price. The ballet slipper of the present invention com prises a fabric upper, but the toe and adjacent "sole portion thereof is cut out and replaced'by a material, preferably suede, which. is especially adapted to take long wear.

The toe of an ordinary ballet slipper is formed from an initially flat piece of material which must be drawn in to form the shape of the toe. 'That is, the excess material is formed into folds or plaits beneath the toe, and these cause considerable trouble during the manufacture of'the slipper inasmuch as they must be repeatedly straightened out and hammered into proper shape. plaits beneath the toe result in bulky places or projections which fray and become ragge very quickly,

in addition to spoiling the trim appearance of the slipper and giving rise to some discomfort to the dancer. Even the stitched toe slipper which is not plaited 1n the ordinary manner is provided with folds at each side of the stitched toe portion in order to tuck away the excess material.

Another object of my invention is to increase the wear, and improve the appearance of a ballet slipper by avoiding bulges an plaits at the toe portion thereof regardless of the material of which the slipper is made, and

Even then, the I UFAC'TURE 015' E 1930. Serial No. 445,261.

to this end I have developed an entirely new techn que in the manufacture of ballet slippers, in accordance with which, the material of the upper is patterned at the toe portion in order to obtain the desired shape without folds or plaits. Not only the upper, but also a filler, say thick elkskin, and toe stiffening members, and the inner lining of the slipper are all appropriately patterned to fit smoothly around the toe of the slipper without folds 60 or plaits of any kind. This results in a trim sllpper the shape of which is practically permanent for the life of the slipper.-

In manufacturing ballet sllppers, the upper is usually applied in inverted condition 85 to a last previously provided with a chan-' neled outsole. The upper in machine stitched to the outsole at the sides and heel of the slipper but the toe portion is always stitched by hand. This introduces a manufacturing step which is very costly but which has been necessary because of the bulk of material to be sewed to the sole at the toe of the slipper.

In the case of the ordinary plaited slipper, it is necessary'to form a plait for each stitch taken, and this is a slow and tedious process.

A still further object of my present invention is to make it possible to machine stitch the upper entirely around the sole, and this is accomplished as above described, for when patterning the material of the upper, and the various filling, stiffening and lining materials, at the toe of the slipper to conform accruately to the toe of the last without folds or plaits, the thickness of material which results is not excessive and can be accommo dated by the ordinary sewing machine now d used solely for the rear portion of the slipper.

In many ballet slippers, a relatively thic filling material is built into the toe of the slipper in order to stiffen the same. Difficulty arises because this filler must be made small in area inasmuch as it cannot be folded and plaited like the rest of the material of the upper, and yet it must be securely an chored in place in order to guard against movement of the same within the slipper.

d A further obj eot of this invention is to overcome the foregoing difficulty and to provide afiller Which is extensive in area which W11]. 1

fact that the upper is to the outsole,

slip 1g. 16 shows the inner lining B6 forward portion cushion and protect the sole, of the slipper adjacent the toe, as well as the toe itself, and yet which will be securely anchored in position. To this end, advantage is taken of the patterned to proper shape at the toe, instead of being left flat until sewed to the sole, and a filler is cemented about the patterned toe of the upper, the filler itself being properly conformed and m trimmed to take the shape of the toe without folds or plaits. With this smooth construction, the filler may be extended along the sole ofthe sli per suflicient distance to be stitched with t e upper and lining materials thereby fixing its location permanently.

Tothe accomplishment of the foregoing andsuch other objects as will hereinafter appear, my invention consists in the ballet go slipper and method of making the same as hereinafter are more particularly descr bed in the specification and sought to be defined in the claims. 'The specification is accompanied by drawings in which:

z5 Fig. 1 is an elevation of a ballet slipper made in accordance with vention;

Fig. 2 is a perspective view of the bottom of the same;

the present ,in-

80 Fig. 3 is a pattern of the fore part of the ig. 4 is apattern of the toe portion of the upper;

Fig. 5 is a pattern of the fore part of the 85 inner lining of the upper;

Fig. 6 is a perspective view of the assembled inverted upper priorto lasting; Fig. 7 shows the same applied to a last;

Fig. 8 is a pattern for, and illustration of as first applied 45 the slipper preparatory to trimming;

ig. 11 shows the same after trimming; F i 12 is a pattern for too stiffening material a Fig. 13 illustrates'the same applied to the so slipper;

1g. 14 is a pattern for another layer of toe stiffening material;

Fig. 15 illustrates the same applied to the (Fig. 5) of the slipper cemented thereto;

Fig. 17 represents the same after the ma.- -terial of the upper has been stitched to the outsole; and in 00 Fig. 18 the slipper has been turned and relasted.

Referrin to Figs. 1 and 2 of the drawings, it will be 0 served that'the ballet slipper of my invention comprises an upper made of a 2, and a heel portion sewed'to an outsole 6, in the customary manner, but the toe portion 8, and sole portion 10 adjacent thereto are made of a material different from the balance of the upper. Considered in one aspect, my invention resides in the provision of a toe slipper capable of long Wear, and for this purpose the toe portion 8 is made of a material especially adapted for long wear. I find that calf suede is most suitable, because it has a rough surface which prevents slipping and yet which does not retard turns. Kid suede is also suitable. These materials may be obtained in the proper color to match the satin of the upper. A smoothly finished leather may be used but is not so suitable because it chips and shows wear.

Considered in another aspect, my invention consists in a new technique for making ballet slippers, in accordance with which all of the material at the toe portion, as well as at the" balance of the slipper, is patterned to take the desired shape Without folds or plaits of any kind, and while this technique may be applied to slippers made of any material, it is particularly applicable to the long wearing slipper hereillustrated because of the difiiculty which would be encountered in an attempt to fold and plait the leather toe portion of the slipper.

It is customary to provide ballet slippers with intermediate, as well as, inner linings. In accordance with one feature of my invention, the desirable patterning and necessary handling of the material of the slipper is greatly simplified by preliminarily backing the satin material from which the slipper is to be made with the intermediate lining. This intermediate lining is preferably a fieecy cloth which is permanently gummed" to the back of the satin. For the remainder of the present description it will be understood, therefore, that only one additional lining, the inner lining, need be considered.

To make a ballet slipper in accordance with my improved process, this double material is patterned as illustrated in Fig. 3 to form the forward portion 2, of the upper. The upper part of this pattern is conventional, but the lower part differs from the usual pattern in that the toe portion has been cut away along the line 12. The dotted line running through the points 14, 16, 18, 20, and 22 indicates the path of the line of stitching which will subsequently attach the toe portion 8, to the upper 2, and it will be noted that a considerable margin 24, say a quarter of an inch, is left between the stitching and the edge of the fabric.

The toe portion 8 10 is out according to the pattern shown in Fig. 4. If the material selected is suede, it is preferably initially backed with a strong fabric adhesively secured thereto, in order to prevent stretching of the suede. The dotted line intercom necting the points'14, 16, 18, 20, and 22 represents the line of stitching corresponding to that shown in Fig. 3 for securing the toe portion to the upper, and it will be noted that the minimum possible margin of material is left between the stitching and the edge of the suede. The points 14, 16, 18, 20, and 22 indicate places on the two pieces of material which are brought into coincidence when they are sewed together. be understood that if it is desired to adopt the process of the present invention without making the toe portion of the slipper of a materialdiiferent from the upper, a suitable pattern may readily be devised which will approximate the patterns of Figs. 3 and 4 put together sothat the line of stitching here indicated need be only partially employed.

Fig. 5 is a pattern for the inner lining at the forward portion of the slipper. This lining is made of the usual canvas-like material, and the upper portion of the pattern is conventional, but the lower portion differs in being suitably cut to form side portions 26 and 28, and-a center portion 30, which may subsequently take the shape of the toe of the slipper without introducing folds or plaits in the material.

No patterns have been shown for the heel portion of the upper and the quarter heel lining, because these are of conventional form. In the present slipper, however, the quarter heel lining instead of being made of the usual canvas-like material is made of suede cloth in order to prevent slipping of the wheel of the dancer in the slipper.

The assembled upper in inverted condi-" tion prior to lasting is illustrated in Fig. 6. In this figure it will be observed that the fleece backed satin material for the forward and heel portions, 2 and 4, of the upper is innermost. The suede cloth quarter heel lining is shown at 32, while the lining for the forward portion of the slipper is shown at 34. The suede toe portion 8. 10 is sewed to the satin upper 2, along the line of stitching indicated in Figs. 3 and 4, and this results in the toe taking the proper toe configuration, instead of being flat in accordance with the usual practi ce. In fact, the patterns and sizes are so accurately worked out, that the upper in the condition shown in Fig. 6 must be forced onto 55, the proper size of last with the aid of a shoe horn, much as is now the case when the slipper is lasted for the second time after having been turned. It should be noted that the stitching at the toe of the upper does not include the inner lining 34. That is, the side portions 26 and 28, and the center portion 30 of the inner lining are quite free from the upper at this time, and are left so until the slipper has been nearly completely assembled. The stitching of the suede toe portion 8, 10 to the upper may precede, but preferably It should follows the sewing together of the balance of the upper, and the detailed steps in the latter process need not be described because they are performed in the usual manner.

An appropriate last, 36, is next selected, and the outsole 6, is temporarily tacked thereto, as at 40. The inner side of the sole, marked at 38, is kept on top, and is'provided with a stitch channel 39. The upper is next forced onto the last 36, and, if desired, several small tacks, 42, may be used to temporarily hold the sides of the upper to the outsole. Guts or slits, 44, are made in the material of the upper beyond the line of stitching at the toe portion, (see Fig. 6) to permit the margin 24 to be folded smoothly back against the upper (see Fig. 7) while the remaining materialis folded over against the sole of the slipper, as at 46. A suitable adhesive is applied to keep the material tightly in place.

A filler or stiffening member for the toe is next applied. This, like the various other materials already or subsequently to be described, is patterned to take the shape of the toe without folds or plaits, but in this case it is preferred to first conform the material to the toe and thereafter trim the excess material. The filler is a suitable thick material, preferably elkskin having a thickness of about one-eighth of an inch, and this is cut to the shape shown in Fig. 8. The edges are skived to taper the thickness of the filler to an even edge. The elkskin is then coated with a suitable adhesive or cement, and applied to the toe of the slipper'with the point 48 up permost, as is illustrated in Fig. 9. The dimension of the filler is. made such that the point 48 overlaps the forward edge of the sole 38 with a safe margin. The filler material isshaped by hand to conform to the toe, and the excess material is confined to four diagonally opposite points, 50, which are finally pinched securely together with the aid of pliers, as is shown in Fig. 10. These points of excess material are next trimmed off, re sulting in a smooth, reinforced, and padded toe, as is shown in Fig. 11.

At this point, it may be mentioned that the filler may be made large in area, and may extend over the sole near the toe until it overlaps the outsole 38, because it is made to conform to the shape of the toe, and it may be made to conform to the shape of the toe in the manner set forth, only because the upper has previously been similarly shaped. In the ordinary process in which the upper is brought to shape only by the final stitching laminations of material are employed, each patterning of the consisting of fabric of strong but relatively open weave, in order that it may be thoroughly impregnated or loaded with cement. The first of these layers is cut in accordance with the pattern shown in Fi g. 12, and the resulting piece of material 52 is impregnated or loaded with an adhesive cement and applied to the toe of the slipper, as is indicated in Fig. 13. The cut of the pattern is such that the pieces of material 54 and 56 may be folded smoothly around the toe of the slipper, and their dimension is preferably such as to overlap the outsole 38 of the slipper.

The second piece of stiffening material is preferably cut in accordance with a difierent pattern, as is indicated in Fig. 14. The resulting piece of material, 58, is impregnated or loaded with cement and ap lied outside of the layer 52, and preferably lower than the same, as is clearly illustrated in Fig. 15, so

that a gradual taper of material away from the toe of the slipper is obtained. The cut portions 60 and 62 of this layer of material are folded smoothly around the toe of the slipper as is evident from the drawings. It should be noted that the patterns are preferably made to differ from one another in the manner illustrated, so that the various seams, which result when folding the stiflening material about the toe, are staggered with relation to one another.

The toe of the slipper now having been sufficiently stiffened and boxed, the lining 34 is next cemented in place. The side portions 26 and 28, and center portion 30, are cemented smoothly in place, as is clearly evident in Fig. 16. Here again, it should be noticed that the lining preferably overlaps the forward portion of the sole 38. p

The upper is now stitched to the outsole 38. Because of the patterning of each of the laminations of material at the toe portion of the slipper, the resulting thickness of material may readily be accommodated by the sewing machine which is ordinarily used to sew the upper to the rear portion of the sole. With the present method, the slipper may be applied to the machine and sewed entirely around the sole, resulting in a saving in time which reduces the cost of manufacturing the slipper tremendously, for the hand stitching heretofore employe was tedious and slow. The saving in labor at this point, alone, more than compensates for the additional cost of the suede toe and the various process steps heretofore outlined. The stitching operation locks the filler and stiffening and lining components of the upper securely to the outsole,

after which, any slight excess of material above the stitches may be trimmed, leaving the slipper in the condition illustrated in Fig. 17.

The slipper is then removed from the last while still in a soft and pliable condition, and is turned so as to bring the satin or right side of the slipper outermost. The turned slipper is then relasted as is indicated in Fig.

,inforced types,

18. During this relasting operation, considerable labor is again saved, for with the present process very little is done at this time other than to roll the sole 38 to accurately fit the last, and slightly iron and smooth the slipper particularly at the toe portion thereof to fit the last, and to smooth out any slight wrinkles and bulges which may have appeared during the turning operation. 'In the ordinary process, at this time it is necessary to straighten out the plaits at the toe portion of the slipper, and in this work considerable time is spent, for the plaits must be individually shaped and hammered in an attempt to overcomejhe natural excess bulge which the material tends to take.

The toe slipper is next removed from the last, and a shank or insole is applied thereto. This may be of the plain leather or steel reand is cemented in place and tacked from the inside through to the outsole. The insole preferably extends to the very toe of the slipper as is indicated in dot ted lines in Fig. 2, in order to stiffen the toe slipper against the weight of the dancer. To obtain the full benefit of this extension of the insole, it is desirable to lock the same against the outsole of the slipper, and for this purpose, in addition to the usual tacks which are applied from the inside of the slipper, I prefer to apply the relatively long nails 70 and 72 through the outside of the slipper, which pass through and are bent over the shank in order to securely lock the outsole and shank together. The nails 70 pass through the outsole 6, and the nails 72 pass through the suede sole portion 10, the latter nails being in a favorable location made possible by the use of suede, for the nails would tear through sat-in.

The slipper'is again lasted, a suitable design being applied to the sole, if desired, such as that shown in Fig. 2, and the slipper is then allowed to dry and set on the last for a period of two day or more. During this time, the adhesive cement, which was liberally used in the formation of the toe of the slipper, sets thoroughly and results in a relatively rigid, stifi, boxed toe formation which is amply capable of taking the weightof the dancer 1n ordinary use.

The method of practicing my invention, and the many advantages thereof, will, it is believed, beapparent from the foregoing detailed description. The slipper which results from my process assumes a smooth, neat, trim shape which is not altered during use. There is no bulge at the bottom ofthe slipper, as is the case when the slipper is plaited, and the labor and expense incident to the formation of a plaited slipper is avoided. When the toe portion is made of wear-resisting material as suede, a slipper is obtained which is capable of indefinite wear, which may be manufactured at a cost as low and yet sue-racer the cost of ordinary plaited slippers, and at a far lower cost than that of stitched toe slippers. 'Ihe suede toe is joined to the satin upper without overlappin seams of any 'nd, so that a neat joint is o tained which does not mar the appearance of the slipper. The upper may be stitched to the sole entirely by machine, and each of the components of the upper may be stitched to the sole even though machine stitching is employed, and this results in decreased cost and increased strength in the finished slipper.

It will be apparent that while I have shown and described by invention in the preferred form, many changes and modifications may be made in the method and slipper structure disclosed without departing from the spirit of the invention, defined in the following claims.

Iclaim: n M

1. In the manufacture of ballet slippers having an outsoleterminating a substantial distance short of the toe of the slipper in the conventional manner, the method which includes cutting and patterning the material as, or lower than,

' of the upper at the toe and front sole portion distance short of the toe iplacing thereof to obtain the proper enclosed or cupped toe shape without folds or plaits, the some in inverted condition on a last provided with an outsole which is short as aforesaid, securing the upper including the cupped toe portion thereof to the short outsole, and turning the sli per.

2. In the manufacture o ballet slippers having an outsole terminating a substantia of the slipper in the the method which includes patterning and sewing the material of the upper including the toe and front'sole portion thereof to the proper enclosed or cupped shape without folds or plaits, placing the upper with its cupped toe in inverted condition on a last provided with a channeled outsole which is short as aforesaid, stitching the upper includin the cupped toe portion thereof to the outso o with a smooth continuous line of stitching and without plaits, and turning the slipper.

3. In the manufacture of ballet slippers having an conventional manner,

outsole terminating a substantial distance short of the toe of the slipper inthe conventional manner, the method which includes patterning the material of the upper at the toe and front sole portion thereof to obtain the proper shape without folds or plaits, placing the same in inverted condition on a last provided with a channeled outsole which is short as aforesaid, adding to the toe portion a filler which in the completed shoe is so patterned as to conform thereto without foldsor plaits, stitching the upper to the outsole, and turning the slipper.

4. In the manufacture of ballet slippers having an outsole terminating a substantial of the distance short of the toe of the slipper in the conventional manner the method which includes patterninglin sewing the material of the upper inclu g the toe and front sole portion thereof to proper shape, placing the same in inverted condition on a last provided with a channeled outsole which is short as aforesaid, adding to the toe portion a thick toe filler which in the completed shoe is so patterned as to avoid excess material causing folds or plaits, stitching the upper and the filler to the outsole, and turning the slipper.

5. In the manufacture of ballet slippers, the method which includes patterning the upper and a linin therefor and stitching both to form all of t e upper except the toe portion, stitching the upper independently of the lining to properly shape the toe portion thereof, placing the resulting upper in inverted condition on a last previously a channeled outsole, adding to t e toe portion a filler which in the completed shoe is so patterned as to conform thereto without folds or plaits, cementing the patterned lining around the toe portion of the slipper, stitching the upper to the outsole, and turning the slipper.

6. In the manufacture of ballet slippers, the method which includes patterning the upper and a lining therefor and stitching both to form all of the upper except the toe portion, stitching the upper independently of the lining to properly shape the toe portion thereof, placing the resulting upper in inverted condition on a last previously pro- 1 vided with a channeled outsole, adding to the toe portion a filler which in the completed shoe is so patterned as to conform thereto without folds or plaits, folding the previously patterned lining around the toe portion of the slipper, stitching the upper and lining to the outsole, and turning the slipper.

7. In the manufacture of ballet slippers,

the method which includes patterning the upper and a lining therefor and stitching both to form all of the upper except the toe portion, stitching the upper independently of the hmng to properly shape the toe portion thereof, placing the resulting upper on a last previously provided with a channeled outsole, adding to the toe portion a filler which in the completed shoe is so patterned as to conform thereto without folds or plaits, cementin to the upper and filler a plurality of toe sti ening members properly patterned to fit around the toe of the slipper, cementing the patterned lining around the toe portion of the slipper, stitching the upper to the outsole, and turning the slipper.

8. In the manufacture of ballet slippers, the method which includes patterning the PP both to formall of the upper except the toe portion, stitching the upper independently to properly shape the toe porr and a lining therefor and stitching tion thereof, placing the resulting upper on a last previously provided with a channeled outsole, adding to the toe portion a filler which 1n the completed shoe is so patterned as to conform thereto without folds or plaits, cementin to the upper and filler a plurality of toe stiflening members properly patterned to fit around the toe of the slipper, cementing the previously patterned lining around the toe portion of the slipper, stitching the upper, intermediate material, and lining to the outsole, and turning the slipper. 9. In the manufacture of ballet slippers having an outsole terminating a substantial distance short of the toe of the slipper in the conventional manner, the method which includes preliminaril patternin .the material of the upper and tlie lining m terials at the toe and front sole portion of the slipper so as to obtain an enclosed or cupped toe shape which conforms to the toe without folds or plaits or like cause of excessive thickness, assembling said upper with a short outsole, and stitching the upper entirely around the short sole.

0 10. In the manufacture of ballet slippers having an outsole terminating a substantial distance short of the toe of the slipper in the conventional manner, the method which includes patternin the material of the upper and the various lling, stiffening, and lining materials at the toe and front sole portion of the slipper so as to obtain an enclosed or cupped toe shape which conforms to the toe without folds or plaits or like cause of excess thickness, assemblin said upper with a short outsole, and stitchlng the upper entirely around the short sole.

11. In the manufacture of ballet slippers, the method which includes patterning the upper and a lining therefor and stitching both to form all of the upper except the toe portion, stitching the upper independently of the lining to properly shape the toe portion thereof, placing the resulting upper in inverted condition on a last previously provided with a channeled outsole, adding to the toe portion a filler which in the completed shoe is so patterned as to conform thereto without folds or plaits, folding the patterned lining around the toe portion of the slipper, stitching the upper, filler, and lining entire- 1 around the outsole, and turnlng the s ipper.

12. In the manufacture of ballet slippers or toe shoes, the method of increasing the wear obtainable therefrom which includes making the flexible upper with a toe portion made of a flexible material adapted for long sole, and

wear, performing the toe portion of the upper to give the same an enclosed or cupped toe sha before securing the same to a sole, assemb 'ng the preformed upper with an outstitchmg the upper entirely around the said outsole.

13. In the manufacture of ballet slippers or toe shoes, the method of increasing the wear obtainable therefrom which includes patterning the upper from pieces of material including a toe portion made of a material adapted for long wear, sewing the material of the upper including the toe portion thereof to pre-formed toe shape, placing the same in inverted condition on a last provided with an outsole, securing the upper including the toe portion to the outsole, and turnin the slipper.

14. n the manufacture of ballet slippers comprising a satin upper and a plurality of linings therefor, the method which includes preliminarily backing the satin with an intermediate lining by gumming the same thereto, thereafter patterning and handling the satin upper and intermediate lining as a single piece of material, conforming the satin and intermediate lining to the shape of a last, and separately patterning the inner lining to the shape of the last.

15. A. ballet or toe slipper comprising an upper made of flexible fabric material the toe of which is cut out and replaced by a different flexible material adapted to take long wear, said materials being so secured toget er at the edges of the cut out portions that the finished outer surface of the slipper is smooth and continuous.

16. A ballet or toe slipper having an outsole terminating a substantial distance short of the toe of the slipper in the conventional manner, said slipper comprising an upper made of flexible fabric material the toe and adjacent sole portion of which, extending to the outsole, is cut out and replaced by a different flexible material adapted to take long wear, said materials being so secured together at the edges of the cut out portions that the finished outer surface of the slipper is smooth and continuous.

17. A ballet slipper having an outsole ter-- minatin a substantial distance short of the toe of the slipper in the conventional manner, comprising a fabric upper the toe and adjacent sole portion of which is out out and replaced by a flexible material adaptedto take long wear, the said upper and toe portion being suitably cut and patterned to take the shape of the toe of the slipper without folds or laits.

18. A allet slipper having an outsole terminatin a substantial distance short of the toe of t e slipper in the conventional manner, comprising an upper patterned to take the shape of the toe without folds or plaits, a filler patterned to conform to the toe of the slipper without folds or plaits, an inner lining patterned to conform smoothly to the toe of the slipper, and an outsole to which the up er is stitched.

19. ballet-slipper having an outsole terminating a substantial distance short of the toe of the slipper in the conventional manner, comprising an upper patterned to take the shape of the toe without folds or plaits, a filler patterned to conform to the toe of the slipper without folds or plaits, a plurality of toe stiffening members properly patterned to fit smoothly around the toe of the slipper, an inner lining patterned to conform smoothly to the toe of the slipper, and an outsole to which the upper is stitched.

20. A ballet slipper comprising an upper and intermediate lining suitably patterned to take the shape of the last without folds or plaits, a filler suitably patterned to conform to the toe of the slipper without folds or plaits, a plurality of toe stiffening members properly patterned to fit smoothly around the toe of the slipper, an inner lining also properly atterned to conform smoothly to the toe of the slipper, and an outsole to which all of the aforesaid components are stitched.

21. A ballet slipper comprising an upper the toe and adjacent sole portion of which is cut out and replaced by a material adapted to take long wear, the said upper and toe portion being patterned to take the shape of the ,toe of the slipper without folds or plaits, a filler patterned to conform to the toe of the slipper without folds or plaits, a lining patterned to conform smoothly to the toe of the slipper, and an outsole to which the upper is stitched.

22. A ballet slipper comprising a satin upperthe toe and adjacent sole portion of which is cut out and replaced by suede in order to take long wear, the said satin upper and toe portion being patterned to take the shape of the toe of the slipper without folds or plaits, a filler patterned to conform to the toe of the slipper without folds or plaits, a plurality of toe stiffening members patterned to fit smoothly around the toe of the slipper, an inner lining also patterned to conform to the toe of the slipper, and an outsole to which one or more of the aforesaid components are stitched. I

23. A ballet slipper comprising a satin upper the toe and adjacent sole portion of which is cut out and replaced by a material adapted to take long wear, the said satin upper and toe portion being patterned to take the shape of the toe of the slipper without folds or plaits, patterned to fit smoothly around the toe of the slipper, an inner lining the quarter heel lining of which is made of suede cloth to prevent heel slippage, and an outsole to which the upper is stitched.

24. A ballet or toe slipper formed without conventional folds or plaits at the toe portion thereof, said slipper comprising an upper made of flexible material the toe portion of which is cut away, and leather wear resisting material stitched to the lower edge of said upper around the cut-away toe portion of the filler and stiifening members slipper and along the sole of the slipper, thereby forming a leather sole and a leather wear resisting toe which are in contiguous relation.

25. A ballet or toe slipper formed without conventional folds or plaits at the toe portion thereof, said slipper comprising an upper made of flexible material the toe portion of which is cut away, wear resisting material stitched to the lower edge of said upper around the cut-away toe portion of the slipper and along the sole of the slipper, and a relatively rigid insole mounted inside of the slipper and extending forwardly to the toe, and securing means driven through the insole and wear resisting material to lock the same together.

26. A ballet or toe slipper formed without conventional folds or plaits at the toe portion thereof, said slipper comprising an upper made of flexible material the toe portion of which. is cut away, wear resisting material turn-stitched to the lower edge of said upper around the cut-away toe portion of the slipper and along the sole of the slipper, said materials being so secured together at the edges of the cut away toe portion that the finished outer surface of the toe portion is smooth and continuous, and an insole mounted inside of the slipper.

27. A ballet or toe slipper formed without conventional folds or plaits at the toe portion thereof, said slipper comprising an upper made of flexible material the toe portion of which is cut away, leather wear resisting material machine-stitched in inverted or turned condition to the lower edge of said upper around the cut-away toe portion of the slipper and along the sole of the slipper, and a relatively rigid insole mounted inside of the slipper.

28. A ballet or toe slipper formed without conventional folds or plaits at the toe portion thereof, said slipper comprising an upper made of flexible material the toe portion of which is cut away, leather wear resisting material machine-stitched in inverted or turned condition to the lower edge of said upper around the cut-away toe portion of the slipper and along the soleof the slipper, a relatively rigid arch supporting insolecemented inside of the slipper and extending fully to sisting material secured to the fabric at the finally mounting an insole within the slipper.

30. The method of making a ballet or toe slipper which is provided with wear resisting material at the toe portion thereof and which has no folds or plaits of conventional type at the said toe portion, which includes patterning, cutting out, and stitching a flexible upper the toe portion of which is cut away, machine-stitching Wear resisting material to the lower edge of the upper'around the cut-away toe portion of the slipper and also along the sole portion of the slipper while the slipper and wear resisting material are in inverted condition, thereafter turning the slipper, and finally mounting an insole within the slipper.

31. The method of making a ballet or toe slipper which is provided with Wear resisting. material at the toe portion thereof and which has no folds or plaits of conventional type at the said toe portion,which includes patterning, cutting out, and stitching a flexible upper the toe portion of which is cut away, machine-stitching leather wear resisting material to the lower edge of the upper around the cut-away toe portion of the s ipper and also along the sole portion of the slipper while the slipper and leather material are in inverted condition, thereafter turning the slipper, and finally mounting a relatively rigid arch supporting insole within the sliper. p A ballet o'r toe slipper comprising a leather outsole terminating a substantial distance short of the toe of the slipper, and an upper the toe portion of which is so out or shaped as to obtain an enclosed or cupped toe shape without folds or plaits or like cause of excessive thickness, said upper being made of fabric but including leather wear retoe portion of the slipper and along the sole of the slipper at the forward end of the aforesaid short outsole, thereby forming leather wear resisting toe and sole portions which are in contiguous relation.

33. A ballet or toe slipper comprising an outsole terminating a substantial distance short of the toe of the slipper, and an upper made of flexible material which is so patterned at the toe and front sole portion as to obtain an enclosed or cupped toe shape which conforms tothe toe without folds or plaits.

or like cause of excessive thickness, the upper being made of fabric but the exposed toe and front sole portion thereof being made of a different flexible material especially adapted to take long wear, said different upper materials being so secured together that the finished outer surface of the slipper is relatively smooth and continuous.

34. In the manufacture of ballet slippers having an outsole terminating a substantial distance short of the toe of the slipper in the conventional manner, and leather wear resisting material on the toe and front sole portion thereof, the method which includes SALVATORE CAPEZIO.

of April, A.'D. 1930.

preliminarily patterning the fabric and.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2619743 *Aug 17, 1950Dec 2, 1952Leo HarrisFormed counter construction for ballet slippers
US2683316 *Feb 14, 1951Jul 13, 1954Edith Deitch ClaraBallet slipper
US4541186 *Apr 6, 1983Sep 17, 1985Nike, Inc.Gymnastic shoe with cushioning and shock absorbing insert
US6018888 *Apr 6, 1998Feb 1, 2000Wilkenfeld; DavidProtective footwear for modern dance
US6588124Aug 13, 2001Jul 8, 2003Ballet Makers, Inc.Ballet shoe sole with gusset
US6857203 *Oct 15, 2002Feb 22, 2005Gloria Minden, Inc.Pleatless ballet slipper
US7765718Feb 14, 2007Aug 3, 2010Pointe Noir Pty Ltd.Dance shoe with moldable foot compartment
US7926203Oct 16, 2007Apr 19, 2011Pointe Noir Pty Ltd.Dance footwear
US7966747Sep 29, 2005Jun 28, 2011Pointe Noir Pty Ltd.Dance footwear
WO2007097658A1 *Jan 25, 2007Aug 30, 2007Roman Yur Evich KukushkinBallet shoes and a vamp therefor
Classifications
U.S. Classification36/8.3, 36/113, 12/142.00P
International ClassificationA43B5/00, A43B5/12
Cooperative ClassificationA43B5/12
European ClassificationA43B5/12