Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS1874066 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 30, 1932
Filing dateApr 28, 1930
Priority dateApr 28, 1930
Publication numberUS 1874066 A, US 1874066A, US-A-1874066, US1874066 A, US1874066A
InventorsBettis Irvin H, Scott Floyd L
Original AssigneeBettis Irvin H, Scott Floyd L
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Combination rolling and scraping cutter drill
US 1874066 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Aug. 30, 1932. F. 1.. SCOTT ET AL COMBINATION ROLLING AND SC RAPING CUTTER DRILL Filed April 28, 1950 Patented Au 30, 1932 FLOYD L. SCOTT AND IRVIN H. BETTIS, OF HOUSTON,

COMBINATION ROLLING AND SCBAPING CUTTER DRILL Application med April 2a, 1930. sen ing. 447,851.

Our invention relates to cutters for earth boring drills.

In drilling deep wells for oil, gas, sulphur and the like, it is almost impossible to con- 6 struct a drill having cutters thereon which are Well adapted for drilling both soft and hard formations. The best type of cutter for soft formations is the scraping cutter, while the most effective drill for hard formations is a 10 rolling cutterhaving teeth which penetrate and chip the rock and disintegrate it so that it may be washed to the surface by the flushing fluid. There are formations, particularly formations which are gummy and plastic, in 1 which rollin cutters simply make depressions or trac s in the material but do not cause it to chip or crumble so that it may be carried away by the flushing fluid.

In the formations of this character where 29 the material is not broken up by the rolling cutters, it is found that the opposite rolling cutters make depressions in the bottom of the hole, and the material forms waves or is bulged up in front of the cutters as they travel around on the bottom of the hole. Little progress is made in this type of formation,

and as a rule the bit hasto= be withdrawn, and a scraping cutter substituted for the rolling cutters.

' It is an object of our inventionto provide an earth boring drill having thereon both scraping and rolling cutters, whereby all types of formation may be cut by the drill without the necessity of withdrawing the bit from the hole until it becomes necessary to do so due to the dulling of the cutters.

A further object is to provide a cutting blade which may be employed with the bits having rolling cutters, thereon of ordinary structure. It is also desired to provide a cutting blade to be used with rolling cutters and in which the blade may be easily held in place and removed when desired.

It is also an object to provide a cutting blade so formed as to interfit in the desired position between rolling cutters such as are now used and to move the material cut thereby upwardly away from the rolling cutters, thus allowing rolling cutters to drill upon uncut surface. 1.

We also desire to mount the cutting blade so as not to project materially in advance of the rolling cutters but to place the same so that the blade will engage the material bulg-. ing up between the rolling cutters.

In the drawing herewith Fig. 1 is a side view of a cutting blade embodying our invention, said blade being shown in position in a longitudinally divided drill head with one side of the head removed.

Fig. 2 is a side elevation of a drill bit having our invention thereon, said view being taken at right angles to the view shown in Fig. 1. p

Fig. 3 is a top plan view of the cutting" 85 blade, therolling cutters and the wall of the hole being shown diagrammatically.

Fig. 4 is a view intended to illustrate the operation of the cutting blade relative to the rolling cutters.

We contemplate employing a cutting blade in connection with rolling cutters of different structure, but preferably with the type of bit known as the cone bit where the cutters are approximately'conical in shape. Witht: reference particularly to Fig. 2, the lower end of the drill bit head 1 is shown, said head being divided along the plane indicated at 2. The two parts of the head are held together particularly by'means of thru-bolts 3," one on each side of the center of the head. The lower end of the head is formed with diverging faces 4, forming a slot or recess of inverted V shape. On the diverging faces 4 are mounted the two rolling cutters 5. This structure is well known in the art and need not be further described. I

The two rolling cutters 5 are spaced apart to allow free rolling motion of the two cutters. We employ a scraping blade 6 adapted to be mounted in the head and between the r two sides of the headthereof as shown in the drawing. The blade 6 may be the full diameter of the hole, although it is preferv ably slightly less in width than the diameter "-3 of the hole as is indicated in Fig. 3. The upper end of the blade is formed with a neck 7, and the head is recessed at 8 to receive this neck or shank. Adjacent the uppenend "of the neck is formed a half round circumferential groove 9 into which the thru-bolts 3 may be engaged to hold the blade securely in position. The lower side of the blade is formed with an opening or recess indicated generally at 10. The shape of this recess is curved and is widened slightly away from the lower end to fit between the adjacent cutters but to avoid contact therewith.. On the advancing side of the blade, the margin of the opening 10 is beveled forwardly and outwardly at 11 to form a deflecting surface which tends to move the material cut by the blade upwardly andaway from the rolling cutters.

. As will be seen from Fig. 2, the forward face of the blade is also extended rearwardly and u wardly at 12 to assist in'carrying the material up away from the lower edge. The rearward side is curved forwardly toward the lower end to provide a cutting edge 13.

The shank 7 of the blade is tubular and of sufficient size to fit about the lower end of the water tube 14, which conducts the flushing fluid. Below the end of said tube, the interior of said shank is widened slightly and flattened to allow the fluid to issue at the upper end of the opening 10 of the blade. WVe have widened the outer ends of the discharge opening as shown at 15, said enlarged openings bein connected by a slot 16. The flushing uid is thereby discharged between the rolling outters and downwardly against the forward edges of the cutting blades.

As will be seen from Fig. 3, the blade is set at a slight angle from the division plane 2 between the halves of the head. This is to provide for the inclination necessary for moving the material upwardly away'from the cutting edges of the blade. The upper shoulder 17 of the blade is received between the lower ends of the head in such manner as to form a wedging fit therewith to assist in holding the blade rigidly in position.

In the operation of the drill thus construced, the cutting blade will act in ordinarily hard formations to scrape up the material disintegrated by the rolling cutters; but in soft and gummy formations, the two sides of. the cutting blade willin the rotation of the head precede the rolling cutters, and the material which is bulged up in front of said cutters will be engaged by the blade end which will act to scrape off this-material between the cutters and move it upwardly out ofthe way as shown in Fig. 1, where the flushing fluid .may carry it to the surface. Each rolling cutter will therefore move on to an uncut surface such as is'indicated at 18 and be allowed to engage therewith to mash it up, loosening it from the cohering material below as the cutterfpasses over the surface left by the blade. The formation engaged by the cutting teeth will be extruded 5 upwardly behind the cutter as shown at 19 in Fig. 4 in such manner that the cutting blade following will engage therewith and scrape off a cutting in the manner shown. Even where the material is not so lastic, and the rolling cutters merely form d e dentations in the formations, the ridges between said indentations will be engaged by the blade and'move upwardly away from the bottom.

It is to be noted that the best results are obtained when the cutting blade is slightl to the rear of the forward sides of the rol ing cutters, but while this is a preferred positlon for the cutters we do not wish to be confined to this positioning thereof; but it is obvious that the cutting blade should not extend materially in advance of the rolling cutters if satisfactory results are to be obtained.

The advantages of this construction lie in the fact that the combination of cutters .adapts the drill for use in all kinds of formations, and in some formations in particular, the combination of rolling and scraping cutters allows the drill to cut more rapidly than either rolling cutters alone or scraping cutters alone could operate. Also while we have shown one integral cutting blade, it is to be understood that this scraping cutter could be made in more than one piece to position the scraping edges at the desired posiblade between said cutters, a shank on said blade fitting within a recess in said head, a clrcumferential groove on said shank, and

ep inthru-bolts extending through said head and into said groove to secure said sections and said blade in operative position.

3. A rotary earth-boring drill, including a head longitudinally divided into two sections, roller cutters on said head, a scraping blade between said cutters, a shank on saidblade fitting within a recess in said head, a circumferential groove on said shank, and thru-bolts extending through said head and into said groove to secure said sections and said blade in operative position, said shank having a central water course therein.

In testimony whereof, we hereunto affix our signatures, this the 2nd day of April,

FLOYD L. SCOTT.

IRVIN H. BETTIS.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2614810 *Jun 16, 1947Oct 21, 1952Reed Roller Bit CoRotary bit
US3148741 *Dec 8, 1960Sep 15, 1964Timken Roller Bearing CoDrill bit and fastening means
US7819208Jul 25, 2008Oct 26, 2010Baker Hughes IncorporatedDynamically stable hybrid drill bit
US7841426Apr 5, 2007Nov 30, 2010Baker Hughes IncorporatedHybrid drill bit with fixed cutters as the sole cutting elements in the axial center of the drill bit
US7845435Apr 2, 2008Dec 7, 2010Baker Hughes IncorporatedHybrid drill bit and method of drilling
US8047307Dec 19, 2008Nov 1, 2011Baker Hughes IncorporatedHybrid drill bit with secondary backup cutters positioned with high side rake angles
US8056651Apr 28, 2009Nov 15, 2011Baker Hughes IncorporatedAdaptive control concept for hybrid PDC/roller cone bits
US8141664 *Mar 3, 2009Mar 27, 2012Baker Hughes IncorporatedHybrid drill bit with high bearing pin angles
US8157026Jun 18, 2009Apr 17, 2012Baker Hughes IncorporatedHybrid bit with variable exposure
US8191635Oct 6, 2009Jun 5, 2012Baker Hughes IncorporatedHole opener with hybrid reaming section
US8336646Aug 9, 2011Dec 25, 2012Baker Hughes IncorporatedHybrid bit with variable exposure
US8347989Oct 6, 2009Jan 8, 2013Baker Hughes IncorporatedHole opener with hybrid reaming section and method of making
US8356398Feb 2, 2011Jan 22, 2013Baker Hughes IncorporatedModular hybrid drill bit
US8448724Oct 6, 2009May 28, 2013Baker Hughes IncorporatedHole opener with hybrid reaming section
US8450637Oct 23, 2008May 28, 2013Baker Hughes IncorporatedApparatus for automated application of hardfacing material to drill bits
US8459378May 13, 2009Jun 11, 2013Baker Hughes IncorporatedHybrid drill bit
US8471182Dec 31, 2009Jun 25, 2013Baker Hughes IncorporatedMethod and apparatus for automated application of hardfacing material to rolling cutters of hybrid-type earth boring drill bits, hybrid drill bits comprising such hardfaced steel-toothed cutting elements, and methods of use thereof
US8678111Nov 14, 2008Mar 25, 2014Baker Hughes IncorporatedHybrid drill bit and design method
US8948917Oct 22, 2009Feb 3, 2015Baker Hughes IncorporatedSystems and methods for robotic welding of drill bits
US8950514Jun 29, 2011Feb 10, 2015Baker Hughes IncorporatedDrill bits with anti-tracking features
US8969754May 28, 2013Mar 3, 2015Baker Hughes IncorporatedMethods for automated application of hardfacing material to drill bits
US8978786Nov 4, 2010Mar 17, 2015Baker Hughes IncorporatedSystem and method for adjusting roller cone profile on hybrid bit
US9004198Sep 16, 2010Apr 14, 2015Baker Hughes IncorporatedExternal, divorced PDC bearing assemblies for hybrid drill bits
US9353575Nov 15, 2012May 31, 2016Baker Hughes IncorporatedHybrid drill bits having increased drilling efficiency
US9439277Dec 22, 2008Sep 6, 2016Baker Hughes IncorporatedRobotically applied hardfacing with pre-heat
US9476259Mar 23, 2015Oct 25, 2016Baker Hughes IncorporatedSystem and method for leg retention on hybrid bits
US9556681Mar 10, 2015Jan 31, 2017Baker Hughes IncorporatedExternal, divorced PDC bearing assemblies for hybrid drill bits
US9580788Feb 3, 2015Feb 28, 2017Baker Hughes IncorporatedMethods for automated deposition of hardfacing material on earth-boring tools and related systems
US20080264695 *Apr 2, 2008Oct 30, 2008Baker Hughes IncorporatedHybrid Drill Bit and Method of Drilling
US20080296068 *Apr 5, 2007Dec 4, 2008Baker Hughes IncorporatedHybrid drill bit with fixed cutters as the sole cutting elements in the axial center of the drill bit
US20090126998 *Nov 14, 2008May 21, 2009Zahradnik Anton FHybrid drill bit and design method
US20090272582 *May 2, 2008Nov 5, 2009Baker Hughes IncorporatedModular hybrid drill bit
US20100018777 *Jul 25, 2008Jan 28, 2010Rudolf Carl PessierDynamically stable hybrid drill bit
US20100025119 *Oct 13, 2009Feb 4, 2010Baker Hughes IncorporatedHybrid drill bit and method of using tsp or mosaic cutters on a hybrid bit
US20100104736 *Oct 23, 2008Apr 29, 2010Baker Hughes IncorporatedMethod and apparatus for automated application of hardfacing material to drill bits
US20100106285 *Oct 22, 2009Apr 29, 2010Massey Alan JMethod and apparatus for robotic welding of drill bits
US20100155145 *Dec 19, 2008Jun 24, 2010Rudolf Carl PessierHybrid drill bit with secondary backup cutters positioned with high side rake angles
US20100155146 *Jun 9, 2009Jun 24, 2010Baker Hughes IncorporatedHybrid drill bit with high pilot-to-journal diameter ratio
US20100159157 *Dec 22, 2008Jun 24, 2010Stevens John HRobotically applied hardfacing with pre-heat
US20100181116 *Jan 16, 2009Jul 22, 2010Baker Hughes IncororatedImpregnated drill bit with diamond pins
US20100181292 *Dec 31, 2009Jul 22, 2010Baker Hughes IncorporatedMethod and apparatus for automated application of hardfacing material to rolling cutters of hybrid-type earth boring drill bits, hybrid drill bits comprising such hardfaced steel-toothed cutting elements, and methods of use thereof
US20100224417 *Mar 3, 2009Sep 9, 2010Baker Hughes IncorporatedHybrid drill bit with high bearing pin angles
US20100270085 *Apr 28, 2009Oct 28, 2010Baker Hughes IncorporatedAdaptive control concept for hybrid pdc/roller cone bits
US20100288561 *May 13, 2009Nov 18, 2010Baker Hughes IncorporatedHybrid drill bit
US20100320001 *Jun 18, 2009Dec 23, 2010Baker Hughes IncorporatedHybrid bit with variable exposure
US20110079440 *Oct 6, 2009Apr 7, 2011Baker Hughes IncorporatedHole opener with hybrid reaming section
US20110079441 *Oct 6, 2009Apr 7, 2011Baker Hughes IncorporatedHole opener with hybrid reaming section
US20110079443 *Oct 6, 2009Apr 7, 2011Baker Hughes IncorporatedHole opener with hybrid reaming section
US20110079444 *Sep 16, 2010Apr 7, 2011Baker Hughes IncorporatedExternal, Divorced PDC Bearing Assemblies for Hybrid Drill Bits
US20110120269 *Feb 2, 2011May 26, 2011Baker Hughes IncorporatedModular hybrid drill bit
WO2015022065A3 *Aug 8, 2014Oct 22, 2015Herrenknecht AgDrill head for expanding a pilot bore in order to create a borehole
Classifications
U.S. Classification175/336
International ClassificationE21B10/08, E21B10/14
Cooperative ClassificationE21B10/14
European ClassificationE21B10/14