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Publication numberUS1874195 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 30, 1932
Filing dateOct 31, 1928
Priority dateOct 31, 1928
Publication numberUS 1874195 A, US 1874195A, US-A-1874195, US1874195 A, US1874195A
InventorsKing Albert Bentley
Original AssigneeKing Albert Bentley
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Internal combustion engine
US 1874195 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Aug. 30, 1932.

A. B. KING,

6 INTERNAL COMBUSTION ENGINE 2 Sheets-Shet 1 Filed Oct. 31. 1928 3nnentor ALBEET BENTLEY ffm a a wW attorney 7 Aug. 30, '1932. A. B. KING 1,874,195

INTERNAL COMBUSTION ENGINE Filed Oct. 31, 1928 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 39 .10- a F g 5 ma ii 6 .10 g 1 4a 1 I; E

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Z6 Z7 7 J0 Z6 z 6 64 a; j 46 I a4 4 I 2 1 1a? 45 I a a a? '1 6 A 5 as zai I 52 A 42 3rwentor 1445597" BE/Y 77.5) ffl/YG attorney Patented Aug. 30, 1932 UNITED STATES LBERT BENTLEY KING, orsAN DIEGO, CALIFORNIA IN ER AL COMBUSTION ENGINE Application filed. October 31,1928. Serial No. 316,215

This invention relates in general to an internal combustion engine and relates more specifically to a new and novel means for making two power impulse strokes on the same crank pin of a single crankshaft during one revolutlon of said crankshaft 1n afourstroke cycle englne.

WVhile the said means is shown applied to a four-stroke cycle engine, it may obviously be applied to other type of machines'and used to equally good advantage. An object of the invention is to provide a simple, efficient means for connecting the pistons of two opposed cylinders with the same crank pin of the single crankshaft.

Another object is to provide a four-stroke cycle engine with a means to create two power impulse strokes, with one revolution of a single crankshaft, on the same crankpin, in a single acting engine.

A further object is to provide a means in a four-stroke cycle engine that will result in economy of fuel and low heat of the cylinder walls, and with vibration substantially eliminated. Another object is to provide two power impulse strokes on the same crank pin of a single crankshaft in a single-acting fourcycle internalv combustion engine, during one revolution of the said single crankshaft, the said power strokes being opposite in direction.

Another object is to provide two opposed cylinders in a single-acting four-cycle internal combustion engine, the said two V opposed cylinders having a common connecting'mechanism between the pistons therein and a single crankshaft whereby, two power impulses per revolution of the said single crankshaft is transmitted through the said common connecting mechanism. The said single crankshaft containing a single crankpin or equivalent. 7 j

A furtherobject is a direct power thrust,

" the connecting rod of the pistontravels substantially along the projected axis of the cylinder.

Another object is to provide in a single acting four-strokecycle engine an auxiliary exhaust port in the Walls of the cylinder,

sacrificing any of the advantages of the which said auxiliary exhaust port will be 0perated by the reciprocating movement of the piston and will only be opened at the end of the power stroke, at all other times said auxiliary exhaust port will be positively closed by the piston itself.

' Another object isto provide what may be termed a quadruple-acting four-stroke-cycle crankshaft-revolution with two opposed single-acting four-stroke-cycle cylinders in an-internal combustion engine.

:Another object is to provide a Well balanced and efficient single-acting four-stroke cycle internal combustion engine.

With these and other objects in view them vention resides and consists in the construction and novel combination and arrangement of parts hereinafter more fully described and illustrated, and pointed out in the claims hereto appended, it being understood that various changes in the form, proportion, size andminor details of construction maybe resorted to by those skilled in the art, without departure from the spirit or invention. I a Similar characters of reference denote like or corresponding parts throughout the several figures of the accompany drawings forming a part of this specification andupon which;-. r

Fig. 1 is a diagrammatic View in section through the engine, showing the relative positions of the pistons, single crank of the crankshaft, and the connecting link mechanism between the said single crank and the two pistons. (For a brief term designating the two cylinders I will term the vertical cylinder or the cylinder on the left hand side, looking at Fig. 1, the L. H. cylinder, and the cylinder on the opposite side the R. H: cylinder). Fig. 1 shows the piston of the L. H. cylinder at the end of the exhaust stroke and at the start of the suction stroke, and the piston of the R. H. cylinder at the end of the compression stroke and the start of the power stroke. Fig. 2 is a diagrammatic sectional view, showing the relative positions of the pistons the single crank of the crankshaft and they mp link mechanism at the end of the suction stroke and start of the compression stroke of the L. H. cylinder and at the end of the power stroke and the start of the exhaust stroke of the R. H. cylinder.

Fig. 3 is a diagrammatic sectional View, showing the relative positions of the pistons, the single crank of the crankshaft and the link mechanism at the end of the compression stroke and the start of the power stroke of the L. H. cylinder and almost the end of the exhaust stroke and the start of the suction stroke of the R. H. cylinder.

Fig. 4 is a diagrammatic sectional view, showing the relative positions of the pistons, the single crank of the crankshaft andthe link mechanism at the end of the power stroke and the start of the exhaust stroke of the L. H. cylinder and the end of the suction stroke and the start of the compression stroke of the R. H. cylinder.

Fig. 1, Fig. 2, Fig. 3 and Fig. 4: combined show but one complete revolution of the sin gle crank of the crankshaft to which the said link mechanism is connected, and the power stroke of one cylinder starts just before the end of the exhaust stroke of the opposite cylinder.

The arrows in Fig. 1, Fig. 2, Fig. 3, and Fig. 4;, indicate the direction of rotation of the crankshaft.

Fig. 5 is a sectional elevation through the internal combustion engine, showing the new and novel opposed cylinder formation, with two pistons connected to the same crank in the crankshaft.

Fig. 6' is a plan view of Fig. 5 and Fig. 7.

. Fig. 7 is a side elevation of the engine.

Fig. 8 is a section through the base portion of the engine at AA in Fig 5.

Referring in detail to the charactersof reference marked upon the drawings, 1 represents the vertical cylinder on the left hand side of Fig. 5, and 2 represents the inclined cylinder of the opposed cylinder unit of the single-acting four-cycle internal combustion engine.

At this time it may be well to note that while I have shown a single V cylinder unit engine, it is obvious to those skilled in the art, that several similar units of cylinder amounts to a mere duplication of the construction shown, and while I have shown an internal combustion engine with an electric spark ignition system and a carburetter gas control system it is also obvious that the engine may be adapted for oil fluids or what is commonly known as the semi-Diesel or Diesel type of engine, in fact my improvement may be adapted to operate on any kind of fluid with any kind of intake supply system or any of the well known governing or throttle control systems. Also as before stated a plurality of V cylinder units may be constructed without departure from my invention, as the same is within my knowledge and I am merely showing a single V cylinder unit, single-acting internal combustion engine as further illustration and description would be superfluous. Further I might add that while I have shown a vertical engine, I can also make a horizontal engine without departure from my improvement.

My invention resides mainly in the assemblage of fixed and moving parts so arranged as to utilize energy derived from the compression or explosion of a fluid or fluids in a single-acting four-stroke-cycle internal combustion engine whereby; two power impulses or power strokes of the four-stroke-cycle are made on a single crank, or the equivalent of a single crank, of a single crankshaft during one revolution of the saidsingle crank-shaft. And I accomplish this as follows:

By providing two V-relate-d cylinders l and 2, each cylinder unit 1 and/or 2 being a single-acting four-stroke-cycle unit and comprising pistons 3 and 4. respectively, connected by piston-connecting rods 5 and 6 respectively to a common connecting link mechanism 7 interposed with the crank-pin 8 of the single crankshaft 9. By referring to Fig. 1, it will be noted, that piston 3 is almost at the end of the exhaust stroke and almost at the start of the suction stroke, (I state the word almost, because the power stroke of one cylinder starts just before the end of the exhaust stroke of the opposite cylinder), and that piston 4 is at the end of the compression stroke and at the start of the power stroke. As the crankshaft 9 follows its direction of rotation (see the arrow in Fig. 1) the piston A moves downward and the piston 3 moves slightly upward then downward, both pistons 3 and 4 moving in turn their respective connecting rods 5 and 6. This action or movement moves the yoke link 10 through its arc to its position shown in Fig. 2. The said yoke link 10 oscillates about a fixed pin 11 connected to the base 12 of the engine. An intermediate link 13 serves to connect the connecting rods 5 and 6 through the respective pins 1 1 and 15 with the yoke link 10, lower yoke link 16, connecting link 17, and a crank pin 8 of the crank-shaft 9. A pin 18 connects the yoke link 10 with the intermediate link 13, while a pin 19 connects the intermediate link 13 with the lower yoke link 16. This lower yoke link 16 oscillates about a fixed pin 20 connected to the base 12. The connecting link 17 is directly connected .to the lower yoke link 16 by a pin connection 21 and at its other end portion to the crank pin 8.

Now by referring to Fig. 2 it will be noted that piston lof the cylinder 2 has reached the end of its power stroke and is at the start of the exhaust stroke (kindly note the direct power thrust, the piston-connecting rod 6 has travelled almost directly along the projected axis of the cylinder 2). Piston 3 of the cylinder 1.is now at the end of the suction stroke and at the start of the compression stroke. By this time, relative to Fig. 1 and Fig. 2, the crankshaft 9 has traveled through an arc of about 81 degrees. By referring to Fig. 2', the various positions of the pistons 3 and 4, connecting rods 5 and 6, intermediate link 13, yoke link 10, lower yoke link 16 and connecting link 17, and the position of the crank shaft 9 will benoted without further description.

The crankshaft continues along its revolution in direction of rotation (see arrow in Fig. 3) for another 99 degrees of arc of travel until it reaches the position shown in Fig. 3. (The total travel of the crankshaft 9 at this point in the description, or from the position shown in Fig. 1 to the position shown in Fig. 3 is 180 degrees.) By re ferring to Fig. 3, the position of piston 4 of the cylinder 2is almost at the end of the exhaust stroke and start of the suction stroke whereas, the piston 3 of the cylinder 1 has i reached the end of the compression stroke and is at the start of the power stroke. The various positions of the several members of the link mechanism 7 which connects the 'iistons 3 and 4 with the crankshaft 9 may be seen in this Fig. 3 without further description. It may be well to note however that there is no dead center in any position of the said link mechanism 7 during the revolution of the crankshaft 9.

The crankshaft 9 continues along its revolution in the direction of rotation (see arrow in Fig. 4) for another 81 degrees of arc of travel until it reaches the position'shown in Fig. 4. p (The total travel of the crankshaft 9 at this time in the description, or from the osition shown in Fig. 1 to the position in *ig. 4 is 261 degrees.) By referring-to Fig. 4, the piston 3 of the cylinder 1 is about at the end of the power stroke and start of the exiaust stroke whereas, the piston 4 of the cylinder 2 has passed theend of the suction stroke and has started on the compression stroke. The various positions of the connecting rods 5 and 6, crankshaft 9 and the comiplete link mechanism 7 are clearly shown in this Fig. 4, at this point in the revolution of the crankshaft 9, without further description. Fig. 4 also shows the auxiliaryexhaust port present engines a vacuum is produced by 22 in cylinder I opened whileFig. 2 shows theauxiliary exhaust port 23in cylinthe movement of the iston therein and exhaust gases are sucked ack into the c linder, making the enginevery ineflicient. y improvement overcomes this said feature and it will be noted by referringto Fig. .7 an exhaust passageway 24 is also taken off the cylinder head 25 of the both cylinders 1 and 2. The exhaust gases both from the auxiliary exhaust ports and the top of the cylinder lead into a common exhaust pipe 26 on both cylinders. Returning to my final arc of-travel of the crankshaft 9 in its course of making one complete revolution, I wish to state that from the position shown in Fig. 4, to the position shown in Fig. 1, the crankshaft 9 travels through anarc of 99 degrees or making (at this time in the description a total of 360 degrees or one complete revolution) hence it will be seen that we have made two power strokes or power impulses on the same crankpin of a single crankshaft. The piston 3 in cylinder 1, moves upward from its position. shown in Fig. 4 to the position shownin Fig. 1 or to the end of the exhaust stroke.

whereas the piston 4 in cylinder 2 moves up-' ward from the position shown in Fig. 4 to the position shown in Fig. 1, or the end of the compression stroke. 1

I wish to have noted at this time, that while I have statedvarious certain degrees of arc of travel for the crankshaft 9 to accomplish the various cycles of the four-stroke cycle, it is obvious that the said various degrees of arc of travel may be varied without departure from the improvement. Also it may be well to note that the two power strokes come directly opposite each other during one complete revolution of the crankshaft. The short suction stroke with its consequent reduction in temperature of the. charge and the low compression needed, coupled with the fact of the long power stroke that utilizes the maximum power of the charge and results in complete after-burning, not only provide for great economy of fuel but result in low heat of the cylinder walls with its resultant benefit.

For the operation of the intake valves 26 of both cylinders 1 and 2 and for the operation of the exhaust valves 27, I provide an overhead camshaft 28 which is driven by a silent drive chain 29 directly from the crankshaft9. Cams 32 for the intake valve rocker arms 30 and for the exhaust valve rocker arms 31 are keyed to the camshaft 28 and are set to function in accordance with the various cycles of the four-stroke-cycle principle. -The overhead camshaft 28 will have about the same speed as the crankshaft 9. This overhead camshaft 28 will-be supported directly from the cylinder body 33 by bracket bearings 34. The operation of an overhead camshaft islwell known and further description would be superfluous. As this engine is adapted for gas, I provide a carburetter gas control system, a carburettor not shown is installed in theintake pipe 35 which leads to the intake ders. This carburetter gas control system is well known and, will be of standard construction.

A timer of standard construction 37 is provided in conjunction with spark-plugs 38 in the well known electric ignition system.

My flywheel 39 will be of suflicient weight to store up sufficient energy to do the work required of it,'and is keyed on the crankshaft 9. 5

The crankshaft 9 will be of a single crank design, havinga single crankpin 8 and two crankarms 40. It will revolve in two crankshaft bearings 41 provided in the engine base 12. On'one end portion of the crankshaft adjacent the flywheel 39 I fix the silent chain sprocket 42 that drives the chain 29 to the camshaft 28. r

The exhaust gases from the cylinders 1 and 2 are carried from the exhaust passages 24 in the cylinder heads and from the exhaust auxiliary ports 22 and 23 to common exhaust 'pes 43 located on eitherside of the cylinders 1 and 2. In this particular case I am making these two said exhaust pipes 43independent of each other.

The pistons3 and 4, with their sets'of pisrii rings will be of light construction and of standard well known design.

The connecting rods 5 and 6 which are.

adapted to connect the pistons 3 and 4 with the link mechanism 7 will also be of well I: own standard construction, further description being likewise superfluous.

This internal combustion engine being of a small size I cast my cylinders 1 and 2 together with the engine base 12 to facilitate a sembling and to cheapen manufacturing,

provision being made however for a cap.

bearing construction for installing the crankshaft 9. A water-jacket44 is provided with necessary intake and exhaust water pipe conn ctions to and from thesaid water-jacket 44.

The cylinder heads 25are'a separate'unit being secured to the cylinders 1 and 2 by stud bolts. A separate water-j acket 46 is cast in said heads 25, which heads 25 also contain ample area intake and exhaust passageways.

The intake valve stems and the exhaust valve stems will have bearings in said heads 25. Means for connecting the intake pipes 35 and the exhaust pipes 43 are also provided in said heads 25. An outward disposed bearing 47 is cast integral with the head 25 and provides bearing for the pin 48 on which the intake and exhaust valve rocker arms move. The heads for both cylinders 1 and 2 will be identical. 7

It may be Well to note at this time that'my cylinder 1 is cast absolutely vertical in a parallel line to one's'ide of the center of pin 20 whereas, cylinder 2 is inclined to one side passageway 36 hence to the cylinof cylinder 1 so that the projected axis of the center of cylinder 2 intersects the center of the said pin 20. This arrangement permits a very or I may say the most efficient link mechanism 7 movement, eliminating excessive stresses and eccentric loads etc., and makes an ideal operating mechanism, with a minimum number of parts.

My link mechanism 7 comprises of four elements to wit; two cranks and two connecting links. The cranks have been named by me in this specification as yoke link 10 and lower yoke link 16 whereas, the two connecting links have been termed, intermediate link 13 and connecting link 17. The yoke link 10 is purely a crank with two extending arms oscillating 011 a fixed pin 11 which is fixed to the engine base 12. The other end portion of the yoke link 10 is connected to the intermediate link 13 by a pin 18. The two extending arms 49 are joined together to one side of the pin 11, at 50. The other crank or so-called lower yoke link 16 has also two extending arms 51 joined together on one end portion 52. This crank 16 oscillates on a fixed pin 20, which pin 20 is fixed in the engine base 12. The other end portion of the two extending arms 51 are connected to the intermediate link 13 by a pin The intermediate link 13 is formed with a yoke end portion 53 which will bear on the outside of the two extending arms 51 of the lower yoke link 16 and is connected to said crank or link 16 by pin 19. The other end portion of this intermediate link 13 has also two extending arms 54 spaced apart so that theconnecting rods 5 and 6 will be connected between arms 54 to the link 13 by pins 14 and 15.

The connecting link 17 is connected to the lower yoke link 16 by a pin 21 and is interposed with the crank pin 8 of the crank-shaft 9. On the crank pin portion of the link 17 I provide a cap 55 (similar to the connecting rods 5 and 6) for connection with the said crank pin 8. This connecting link 17 will be about the same construction as the connecting rods 5 and 6. It is obvious that the form and proportion of the members of this link mechanism 7 may be modified without departure from the invention.

Base covers 56 and 57 are adapted to be removable and provide access to the base portion 12 of the engine.

The entire engine will be sufiiciently lubricated.

Having thus described my invention, what I claim and desire to secure by Letters Patent is: V

1. In an internal combustion engine, a pair of cylinders, a piston reciprocally mounted in each cylinder, a common crankshaft positioned in pronounced ofiset relation to one side of the axes of said cylinders, common link means connecting the piston rods of said pistons, oscillatory means connected with said link means, link means connecting said crankshaft and said oscillatory means, and means controlling the movement of said common link means, whereby said pistons perform double reciprocations during each complete revolution of said crankshaft.

2. In an internal combustion engine, a pair of cylinders, a piston reciprocally mounted in each cylinder, a common crankshaft positioned in pronounced oifsetrelation to one side of the, axes of said cylinders, common link means connecting the piston rods of said pistons in spaced pivotal points, an oscillatory lever connected at its free end to said link means in spaced relation to said pivotal points, means connecting said crankshaft with said lever and second oscillatory means connected at its free end to said link at a point intermediate said pivotal points, whereby each piston performs a double reciprocation of unequal length in said cylinder during each complete revolution of said crankshaft.

3. In an internal combustion engine, a pair of cylinders, a piston reciprocally mounted in each cylinder, a common crankshaft positioned in pronounced offset relation to one side of the axes of said cylinders, common link means connecting the piston rods of said pistons in spaced pivotal points, an oscillatory lever connected at its free end to said link means in spaced relation to said pivotal points, means connecting said crankshaft with said lever and second oscillatory means connected at its free end to said link at a point intermediate said pivotal points, whereby each piston performs a double'reciprocation of unequal length in said cylinder during each complete revolution of said crankshaft, said cylinders having ports in their walls so positioned that they are uncovered by said pistons during a single period only during each revolution of said crankshaft.

4. In an internal combustion engine, a pair of cylinders positioned side by side with their axes at an angle and in a common plane, a piston reciprocal in each of said cylinders, an oscillatory lever pivoted ata point near the intersection of the axes of said cylinders, link means connected with the free end of said lever and with the piston rods of said pistons at spaced pivotal points, a second pivotally mounted lever connected to said link intermediate said pivotal points and a crankshaft connected with said first lever, the relation of said lever and links being such as to cause a double reciprocatory movement of each piston of unequal lengt r, the shorter stroke of one piston coinciding with the longer stroke of the other piston.

5. In an internal combustion engine, a pair of cylinders positioned side by side with their axes at an angle and in a common plane, a

piston reciprocal in each of said cylinders, an oscillatory lever pivoted at a point near the intersection of the axes of said cylinders, link means connected with the free end of said lever and with the piston rods of said pistons at spaced pivotal points, a second pivotally mounted lever connected to said link intermediate said pivotal points and a crankshaft connected with said first lever, the relation of said lever and links being such as to cause a double reciprocatory movement of each piston of unequal length, said cylinders having exhaust ports in their walls, said ports adapted to be exposed on completion of a long stroke of said pistons and concealed during all otherperiods of an operation cycle. 7

ALBERT BENTLEY KING.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4380972 *Jul 8, 1980Apr 26, 1983Parkins Malcolm FrederickInternal combustion engines
US6058901 *Nov 3, 1998May 9, 2000Ford Global Technologies, Inc.Offset crankshaft engine
US6904883Jun 2, 2003Jun 14, 2005Tecumseh Products CompanyModular internal combustion engines
US6941914Apr 8, 2003Sep 13, 2005Tecumseh Products CompanyInternal combustion engine
US7219647 *Dec 16, 2005May 22, 2007Michael Dennis BrickleyForce transfer mechanism for an engine
Classifications
U.S. Classification123/78.00F, 123/53.1, 123/54.4
International ClassificationF01B7/12, F02B75/32, F02B75/22
Cooperative ClassificationF02B75/048, F02B75/22, F02B75/32, F02B2275/20, F01B7/12
European ClassificationF02B75/04E, F02B75/22, F01B7/12