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Publication numberUS1875419 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 6, 1932
Filing dateMar 6, 1930
Publication numberUS 1875419 A, US 1875419A, US-A-1875419, US1875419 A, US1875419A
InventorsW. L. Claypool
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
claypool
US 1875419 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Sept. 6, 1932.

W. L. CLAYPOOL ROTARY PUMP Filed March 6. 1930 4 Sheets-Sheet 2 Fiy'.

INVENTOR A'ITORNEYS Sept. 6, 1932. w. cLAYPooL ,3

ROTARY PUMP Filed March 6, 1930 4 Sheets-Sheet 3 F1 'IB'INVENTOR BM ZaMvW/c F I V ATTORNEYS P 1932 w. 1.. CLAYPOOL 1,875,419

RO-TARY PUMP Filed March 6, 1950 4 Sheets-Sheet 4 INVENTOR 'f 7/6 ATTORNE Patented Sept. 6, 1932 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE wALLAcE L. cLAYrooL, or DAVENPORT, rowA, ASSIGNOR 'ro wnssrco cnrrrnwA rum COMPANY, or DAVENPORT, IOWA, A CORPORATION or DELAWARE ROTARY PUMP Application filed March 6, 1930. Serial No. 433,583."

This invention relates to rotary pumps, and particularly to rotary pumps'suitable fon use in deep wells. I

One of the objects \of the present invention is to provide a new and improved deep-well pump of the rotary type wherein a plurality ofpumping rotors are employed.

Another object is to provide a deep-well pump of such construction that greater. pressures and higher efficiencies can be obtained than with pumps of corresponding size used heretofore.

Another object is to provide a deep-well pump wherein the liquid being discharged is prevented from coming into contact with .the pump'shaft.

A further object is to provide a deep-well pump embodying improved details of construction whereby the costs of manufacture and of assembly are greatly reduced over other pumps of the same class.

Another object is to provide a deep-well pump of the rotary type wherein one or more additional rotors and casing sections of standard design may be utilized to.give the desired pressure and capacity for wells of difl'ere nt depths.

Another object is to provide a rotary deepwell pump of such construction that it may be used in wells of small diameter with great facility and of such construction that the diameter of the pump proper can be nearlyas large as the, diameter of the well.

1 A further object is to provide a sliding fit between the pump shaft and thedrive shaft of a rotarv deep-well ump to compensate for shortening of the driveshaft caused bv rotation, and to thereby reduce friction and wear. A A still further obiect is to provide an improved means for lubricating the drive shaft bearings of a rotary deep-well pump..

With the foregoing and other objects in view which will be apparent from the detailed description to follow, this invention consists in certain novel features of construction and combination of parts which will be readily understood by those skilled in the art. .to which the inventionappertains.

In the drawings which illustrate a suitable embodiment of the present invention,

Figure 1 is a fragmentary longitudinal View of the complete pumping mechanism, portions of the same being broken away and shown in section.

Fig. 2 is an enlarged sectional view of the lower portion of the pump, showing the use of two intermediate casings and three rotors.

Fig. 3 is an enlarged section taken on'the line-33 of Fig. 1 showing the guiding and centering means for the pump drive shaft.

Fig. 4 is an enlarged longitudinal section of the lower end ofa pump embodying a single rotor, and showing the sliding connection between the pump and drive shafts. .Fig. 5 is a transverse section taken on the line 5-5 of Fig. 4.

Fig. 6 is a transverse section taken on the line 6-6 of Fig. 4.

Fig. 7 is a transverse section taken on' the line 7-7 of Fig. 4.

Fig. 8 is an enlarged transverse section taken on the line 88 of Fig. 4. V

Fig. 9 is an enlarged upper plan view of the lower pump casing.

Fig. 10 is a side elevation of the casing shown in Fig. 9, a portion of the walls thereof being broken away to show the inlet theret x Fig. 16 is an enlarged'section taken sub-.

stantially on the lines 1616 of Figs. 2 and 12. A I Fig. 17 is an enlarged fragmentary longi-' Fig. 11 is an enlarged section taken on the tudinal section of the-upper portion ofthe pumping' inechanism, showing" a filtering mechanism for the water which is returned to, the shaft housing for lubricating.

The present invention contemplates an improved pump for deep wells, such as the type used for household water supply sysditional rotors and casings'of a standard design may be easily assembled without neces sitating a ch'ange'in construction of the rotor or casing of the single rotorpump. In other words, the construction to be hereinafter described, is so designed that it is unnecessary.

to design a difierent pump for each well of a different depth, because a single-stage type of construction may be readily adapted for use in a deeper well by merely assembling thereto as many intermediate stages as necessary to raise the liquidto be pumped and deliver it at the desired pressure. The manufacturin and assembly cost, as well as stock storage, is materially lessened'by employing a number of stages of standard design.

The invention further contemplates a pump construction which can be very easily assemf bled in 'wells ofrelatively small diameter,

and which embodies improved construction features that greatly add to the life of the pump and contribute greatly to the smoothness of operation.

Referring to the accompanying drawings in which like numerals refer to like parts throughout the several views, the pump proper of the single rotor construction comprises, as shown in Figs. 4, 6, 9 to 11, inclusive, and

' 15, mated upper and lower casing sections 1 and 2, respectively, that are held together by bolts 3, Each of the casing sectionshas a transversely extending central tubular boss 4 that has a bearing 5 mounted therein for a shaft 6, upon which shaft a rotor 7 is mounted by means of a key 7a. The shaft 6 is provided with a shoulder 8 against which the rotor 7 abuts and is rigidly held by means of a nut 9 threaded on the shaft 6. The lower end 10 of the shaft 6 which is-journaled in the lower bearing 5 is reduced in diameter and is seatedagainst a suitable thrust bearing 11 carried by, a plug 12 threaded in the lower end of the boss 4 of the lower casing 2. The rotor 7 is substantially of disk form having a series of suitable liquid-propelling buckets 21 formed therein /on each lateral face by radial ribs 22 extending outwardly to the periphery thereof.

Projecting inwardly from the casing sections 1 and 2 are annular flanges 13 and 14, respectively, which form the'inner walls of the pressure-building passage 15. The

rotationof the rotor.

flanges 13 and 14 merge into shouldered webs 16 and 17, respectively, which are formed in the outer walls 18 and 19 of the passage 15. These shoulder portions of the webs 16 and 17 abut to provide stop means for deflecting fluid from the pressure-building passage 15 through the outlet port 20 of the pump formed in the upper casing section 1.

The space between the flanges 13 and 14 of the two mated casing sections 1 and 2 is only of sufiicient size to permit unrestricted operation of the rotor therebetween, without permitting any substantial flow of liquid transversely of the pressure-developing passage.

sponding faces of the rotor to cooperatively.

define the passage or fluid raceway 15 between the casing sections and rotor. The close running fit between the annular flanges 13 and 14 and the cooperating side faces of the rotor thusprevents any substantial radial flow of liquid from the raceway 15 along the side faces of the rotor.

The shouldered webs 16 and 17 provide only operatingclearance for the pump rotor, and in combination with the abutting shoulders thereof thereby constitute a stop means that directs the flow'of fluid from the pressuredeveloping passage 15 through the outlet port20. I

Referring to Figs. 1't011 and 15, the liquid inlet 23 for the passage 15 is formed in the lower pump casing section 2 at a substantial angle, inclinin toward the direction of rotation, so that t e liquid will enter the passage approximately tangential thereto. Similarly the outlet 20in the upper casing section inclines away from the direction of It is to be particularly noted, as shown in Fig. 11, that the outlet 20 in the casing section 1 is positioned at one side of the abutted shoulders of the webs 16 and 17, and that the inlet 23 in the casing section 2 is positioned at the "other side thereof so that theliquid makes as large an annular path in the pump as possible.

The inlet 23 extends entirely across the passage 15 into the'upper casing section, the adjacent walls 'of the shouldered webs 16 and 17 being inclined to substantially the same degree 'so that the liquid will enter the passage 15 at both sides of the rotor. In a similar manner, the outlet 20 extends from the bottom of the passage in the lower casing section up and through the upper casing section so that the liquid discharged will leave from both sides of the rotor.

The present invention, as previously mentioned, contemplates the use of additional rotors andcasing sections which may be ascasing sections- 1 and 2 just described in order that greater pressures may be obtained. Fig.1 shows the use of one additionalrotor and Fig. 2 shows the. use of two additional rotors. In describing these views the same numerals heretofore used in connection with the single rotor construction referred to, will be employed. 1

In the, construction shown in Fig 1, a single intermediate casin section 25 is'em- .ployed. The upper sur ace of this casing section 25 cooperates with the upper casing section 1 and functions in the same manner as the upper face of the lower casing section 2 to form the passage 15 for the upper rotor 7. In asimilar manner the lower face of the casing section 25 cooperates with the face of the lower casing section 2 to form a liquid passage 26f0r a second rotor 27.

In this construction the shaft 6 extends through the intermediate casing section 25 and has a spacer 28 thereon to correctly position the rotors 7 and 27. The spacer 28, which rotates with the shaft 6, is journaled in a suitable bearing 29 carried by the central portion of the intermediate casing section 25. I

Referring now to the three-stage pump shown in Figs. 2, 12 and 16, two such intermediate casing sections of the type shown in F ig. 1 are employed between the upper and lower casings 1 and 2, respectively. For clearness of illustration the upper intermediate casing section is numbered 25 tocorrespond with the casing section shown in Fig. 1, and the lower intermediate casing section is numbered 25a. The corresponding parts of these casing sections are correspondingly designated. Similarly, the lower rotor is designated 27a. r

The intermediate casing sections 25 and 25a are identical and only one will now be described in detail. The intermediate casing section 25 is of the same diameter as the sections 1 and 2, and the opposite faces of.

the section 25 are formed in substantially .the same manner as the respective lower and upper faces of the sections 1 and 2. The upper face of the section 25 is thus formed,

- as shown inFig. 12, with an outer circular wall 30, a central flange 31, and a shouldered web 32 connecting the inner and outer walls of the channel, which correspond with the outer wall 19, central flange 14 and shouldered web 17 of the lower section 2.

Similarly the lower face of the section 25 is formed with an outer passage wall 33, a central flange 34 and a shouldered web 35, which correspond with the wall 18, central flange 13 and shouldered web 16=of the upper section 1. I

The corresponding parts of .the upper sectionl and intermediate section 25 combine to form the third-stage fluid passage 15, the

corresponding parts in the lower and upper faces of the intermediate sections 25 and 25a combine to form the intermediate stage pas- The passages 15 and 26 are connected by an inclined passageway 36, positioned between the shoulders of the webs 32 and 35 of the section 25, a substantial continuatlon the lower side of the shoulder of the web 16. A substantial continuation 37a of the inlet 23 is formed in the section 25a at the lower side of the shoulder of the web 35a.

The intermediate sections 25 and 25a are also provided with substantial continuations 39 and 39a. of the passageways 20 and 36, respectively, at the upper sides of the shoulders of the webs 32 and 32a, respectively, and a substantial continuation 40 of the passage 36a is also formed in the lower section 2 at the upper side of the shoulder of the web 17.

These substantialcontinuations just described are suitably curved and rounded to provide an unrestricted flow of the fluid being pumped through the inlet between the pressure-building passages from both sides of the respective rotors and into the outlet 20.

The liquid in being pumped thus is drawn into the first-stage passage 26a through the inlet 23 and continuation 37a thereof, and then substantially around the passage 26a and is deflected by the shoulder stop portions ofthe webs 17 and 35a through the passageway 36a and continuations 40 and 37 into the intermediate-stage pressure-building passage .26. From this stage, the liquid is deflected by the abutted shoulder stop portions of the webs 32a and 35 through the passageway36 and continuations 39a and 38'into the upper-stage pressure-building passage 15. The liquid then travels around this passage and is deflected into the outlet 20 by means of the abutted shoulder stop portions of the webs 32 and 16. V

The intermediatejcasing sections and rotors are thus of standard design, and it is obvious that the pressure desired can be easily obtained by using one or more of such sections with the same upper and lower casing sections used in a single-stage pump construction, the only change required being a different shaft 6 of sufficient length to accommodate the additional rotors and casing secti ns therefor.

The means for operating the pump and .38 of which. is formed in thesection 1 at connections therefor will now be described. Referring to Figs. 1, 2 and 4, it will be seen that the upper casing section 1 is provided with an upward extension 41 surrounding one side of the boss 4 and having a relatively large threaded open end 43 and providing a passage 42 in communication with the outlet 20. Itwill also be seen that the upper end of the boss 4 is threaded to receive a *tubular member 44 which encloses the shaft 6.

The upper end of the pump shaft 6 is formed with suitable longitudinal splines 45 which slidably receive a splined sleeve 46 to which is secured a lower drive shaft section 47 by means of a pin 46a.

The drive shaft is built up with a sufiicientnumber of shaft sections 48 which are secured to each other by suitable coupling sleeves 49-, the lower of which is secured to the splined section 47 which carries the splined sleeve 46. The drive shaft sections 48 extend to the top of the well, the upper most section 48 being slidably but not rotatably received by the armature shaft 50 of a suitable motor 51, and provided with an adjusting nut 52 threaded and keyed g thereonto which engages the shaft 50. The

motor 51 is carried by a suitable base and housing 53 which may be mounted on a suitable foundation (not shown) at the surface of the well.

.8 The liquid being pumped is discharged throughanputer casing which comprises a number of relatively large tubular members 54 secured together by suitablepipe con plings '55, the lower member 54 being threaded into the end 43 of the casing section into th'e annular guide 60 which carries the bearing 62. The uppermost section 44 ex extension 41, and the upper member 54 being threaded into a flange 56 which is secured. by

bolts or studs 57 to the base of the housing 53, as shown in Fig. 17. The housing 53 is provided with a conduit 58which connects the outer casing member 54 with a suitable discharge pipe 59. I

A suitable drive shaft guide 60 havinga number of radial projections 61 thereon is positioned between the abutting ends of .each pair, of outer casing members 54. Ea'ch plishd by providing a suitable number of the tubular sections ,44 which surround'the pump shaft 6 and drive shaft sections 48.

Each tubular section 44 is threaded at its ends tends through the discharge conduit 58 and "into the stuifing box 64 formedthereinu T he stufiing box throat 65 forms the bottom of ings' 44 and 'ing the same.

the stuflirig box 64 and provides openings through which filtered'water enters the shaft housing 44. It is thus seen,-that the drive shaft and pump shaft are completely pro-' tected from the liquid being pumped through the outer casing 54 and out through the-discharge pipe' 59.

The section 44 of the tubular member surrounding the pump shaft 6 is divided, and an annular member 66 is interposed between the adjacent ends of the divided sections, which are united by a coupling 67. The opening in the annular member 66 is substantially less than the diameter of the adjacent drive shaft coupling 49 so that when the drive shaft sections are being assembled, the annular member 66 will form a substantial support there wearing of the same in order that the chamber may be efiectively sealed. The sliding connection provided by the splined coupling 46 between the pump and drive shafts com ensates for any shortening of the drives aft occasioned by rotation thereof since such pumps are operated at fairly high speeds, and thereby prevents binding of the pump rotor. g

The bearings 5 and 62 for the pump and drive shafts are preferably of the oilless type.

Lubrication of these bearings is providedby by-passing a small portion of the liquid, such as Water, being discharged through the conduit 58, by means of a pipe 70 into a suitable filter 68.to remove grit, sand and other abrasive matter. transferred through a suitablepipe 69 and 4 through openings provided in the throat 65,

The filtered liquid is then so that it may flow through the shaft housprevent the, bearings from overheating. I

It is obvious, therefore, that thefpump construction of the present invention lends itselfparticularly to assembly for use in wells V several hundred feet deep because of its simplicity and relatively small size. f

A construction i provided inwhich rem tively high pressures can be obtainedby as sembling any numberof rotors and easing sections therefor of a standard design to a .single stage pump without materially chang- Such intermediate casing sections of the type described obviate the necessitybf designing different pumps for wells of differentdepths and also obviate the ne cessity of providing large storage spaces.

The pump casing sections, while being very effective when assembled, can be economically manufactured and easily assembled, "particularly in wells of great depth and small diameter.

described, and the particular procedure set forth, are presented for purposes of explanation and illustration and that various modi- A fications of said apparatus and procedure can be made without departing from my invention as defined in the appended claims.

What I claim is: I

1. In a multiple-stage rotary pump, a casing having a plurality of annular fluid passages, rotors for said passages each having a series of marginal buckets' at its opposite sides facing toward the sides of said passage, means to resist inwardly radial movement of fluid" between said rotors and adjacent portions of said casing, an inlet communicating with one of said passages, an outlet communicating with another of said passages, and stop means in each passage for deflecting fluid from both sides of the rotor therein to both sides of the rotor in an adjacent passage.

2. In a multiple-stage rotary pump, a casing having a plurality of annular fluid passages, rotors for said passages each having a series of marginal buckets at its sides, means to resist inwardly radial movement of fluid between said rotors and adjacent portions of said casing, an inlet communicating with one of said passages, an outlet communicating with another of said passages, and stop means in each passage for deflectin fluid into an adjacent passage, each of said stop means comprising webs extending across the passage in substantial running contact with the sides of the adjacent rotor and a shoulder portion in substantial running contact with the periphery of said rotor.

, 3. In a multiple-stage rotary pump, a casing having a plurality of annular fluid pas-- sages, rotors for said passages each having a series of marginal buckets on each lateral face extending to the periphery thereof, and

each being laterally and peripherally spaced from the walls of the enclosing passage, means to resist inwardly radial movementof fluid between said rotors and adjacent portions of said casing, an inlet communicating with one of said passages, an outlet comn'ounicatingwith another of said passages, and stop means in each passage for deflecting fluid into an adjacent passage. 4. In a multiple-stage rotary pump, a casing having a plurality of annularfluid pas V sages, rotors for said passages each having a series of marginal buckets on eachlateral face extending tothe periphery thereof, and

,each being laterally and peripherally spaced from the walls of the enclosing passage, means to resist inwardly radial movement of fluid between said rotors and adjacent por- Furthermore, it is to be understood that the particular forms of apparatus shownand tions of said casing, an inlet communicating with one of said passagesfan outlet com.-

in each passage for deflecting fluid from both sides of the rotor therein to both sides of the rotor in an adjacent passage. I

6. In a multiple-stage rotary pump, a casing having a plurality of annular fluid passages, rotors for said passages each having a 5. In a multi le-stage rotary pump, a casseries of marginal buckets on each lateral face extending to the periphery thereof and each being laterally and peripherally spaced from the walls of the enclosing passage, means to resist inwardly radial movement of fluid between said rotors and adjacent portions of said casing, an inlet communicating with one of said passages, an outlet communicating with another of said passages, and stop means in each passage for deflecting fluidinto an adjacent passage each of said stop means comprising webs extending across the passage in substantial running engagement with the sides of said rotor. and having portions in substantial running engagement with the peripheryof said rotor. I

7. In a multiple-stage rotary pump,-a casing having a plurality of communicating fluid passages, an inlet communicating with one of said passages, a discharge outlet communicating with another of said passages, rotors for said passages, each having a series of peripheral buckets at each side lying within the fluid passage and beinglaterally and peripherally spaced from the walls ofsaid fluid passage, and means to restrict inwardly radial movement ,of fluid betwieen the rotors and adjacent portions of said casing thereby forming closed fluid passages.

8. In a multiple-stage rotary pump an upper casing section having an annular c annel and an outlet, a lower casing section having an annular channel and aninl et, a plurality of intermediate casing sections, each of said intermediate casing sections having annular channels at opposite sides, the channel at one side of one section cooperating with the channel in said lower casing section to form a pressure-developing fluid passage, the

ing fluid into an adjacent passage.

9. The combination in a multiple-stage rotary pump having end casing sections,,each of said sections being formed with an annular channel, and one of said end sections having an inlet and the other of said end sections hav ingan outlet, of a number of identicalintermediate casing sections any number of which inay be positioned between said end sections to provide the desired number of pressure stages, each of said intermediate casing sections having an annular channel in one side corresponding to the channel in one of said end casing sections, and an annular channel in the other side corresponding to the channel in the other of said end casing sections whereby when said pump is assembled adjacent channels in said end and intermediate casing sections combine to form closed pressure-developing fluid passages, a rotor for each of said passages, meansto prevent escape of fluid between said rotors and adjacent portions of said sections, and stop means for deflecting fluid from one fluid passage to another fluid passage;

10. In a multiple-stage rotary pump, an upper casing section having an outlet, a lower casing section having an inlet, one or more intermediate sections of standard design positioned between said upper and lower casing sections, each of said casing sections having an annular channel thereincooperable with a corresponding channel in an adjacent casing section toform a pressure-developing fluid passage, a rotor between adjacent casing sections and having marginal buckets lying within the fluid passage formed by said adj acentcasing sections, and stop means in said fluid passages for deflecting fluid into an adjacent fluid passage.

11. In a multiple-stage rotary pump, an upper casing section having an outlet, a lower casing'section having an inlet, one or more intermediate sections of standard design .positionedbetween said upper and lower casing sections, each of said casing sections having i an annular channel therein cooperable with a corresponding channel in an'adjacent casing section to form a fluid passage, a rotor between adjacent casing sectionsand'having marginal buckets on each lateral face, the edges of said buckets being laterally and peripherally spaced from thewalls of the enclosing fluid passage, and sto means in said fluid passages for deflecting uid into an adjacent fluid passage.

12. In a multiple-stage rotary pump, an upper casing section having an outlet, a lower casing section having an inlet, one or more intermediate sections of standard design positioned between said upper and lower casing sections, each of said casingsections having an annular channel therein cooperable with a corresponding channel in an adjacent casing section to form a pressure-developing fluid passage, a rotor between adjacent casing sections and having marginal buckets lying with-Q in the fluid passage formed by said adjacent casing sections, and stop means in said fluid passages for deflecting fluid into an adjacent fluid passage, each of said rotors having a running fit radially inwardly of the buckets thereof with portions of the adjacent casing sections to prevent the escape of fluid radially inwardly.

13. In a multiplestage rotary pump, an a 1 upper casing section having an outlet, a lower casing section having an inlet, one or more intermediate sections of standard design positioned between said upper and lower casing sections, each of said casing sections having an annular channel therein c operable with a corresponding channel in an adjacent casing section to form a fluid passage, a rotor between ,adjacent casing sections and having marginal buckets on each lateral face extending to the ppriphery thereof, the'edges of said buckets being laterally and peripherally spaced from the walls of the enclosing fluid passage, and stop means in said fluid passages for deflecting fluid into an adjacent fluid passage, each of said rotors having a running fit radially inwardly of the buckets thereof with portions of the adjacent casing sections to prevent the escape of fluid.

14. In a multiple-stage rotary pump, a casing having a plurality of annular fluid passages, accurately spaced rotors for said passages each having a series of marginal buckets-at both sides lying within a fluid passage and each having a running flt with the adjacent portions of said casing radially inwardly of the adjacent passage to resist inwardly radial movement of fluid, an inlet communicating with one of said passages, an outlet communicating with another of said passages, and stop means in said passage for deflecting fluid into an adjacent passage.

15. In a multiple-stage rotary pump, a plurality of casing sections having annular channels therein cooperable with the channels of adjacent sectionsto form annular fluid passages, accurately spaced rotors for said passages each having a series of marginal buckets on each lateral face and lying within the enclosed passage, said rotors having running fits with the portions of adjacent casing sections lying radially inwardly of the chanstub shaft and being longitudinally movable relative thereto, a sectional tubular member surrounding said stub shaft and drive shaft,

an annular assembly ring supported within said tubular member for supporting said drive shaft against movement toward said stub shaft while said drive shaft is being assembled driving-means for rotating saiddrive shaft, and means engageablewith said driving means for moving said drive shaft longitudinally away from said stub shaft. 17 In a vertical-type rotary pump, an up: per'casing section having an outlet, a lower casing section having an inlet, each section having an annular channel therein cooperatable with the channel in the other to form a fluid passage, a rotor between said sections having marginal bucket portions lying in said fluid passage, said upper section having a depression therein registerable with the inlet in said lower section to admit fluid into ,said passage at both sides of said rotor, and said' lower section having a depression therein registerable with the outlet in said upper section to discharge fluid from said passage at both sides of said rotor, and stop means in said passage between said inlet and outlet for directing fluid into said outlet.

. 18. In a multiple-stage rotary pump, an

upper casing section, a lower casing section, one or more intermediate casing sections of standard design positioned between said upper and lower casing sections, each of said sections having one or more annular chan nels therein cooperatable with corresponding channels in the adjacent casing sections to form a plurality of fluid passages, a rotor between each pair-of adjacent sections and having marginal buckets on its lateral faces lying within the fluid passage formed by the channels therein, said lower section and intermediate sections having inlet passages communicating with the channels therein,

' said upper section and intermediate sections having outlet passages communicating with i the channels therein, and cooperatable stop" means on said sections for diverting fluid in said fluid passages int'o adjacent fluid passages.

19. In a multiple-stage rotary pump, an upper casing section, a lower casing section, one or moreintermediate; casing sections of standard design positioned between said up-. per and lower sections, each of said sections cooperatable with corresponding channels in adjacent casing sections to form a plurality of axial fluid passages, a rotor between each pair of sections and having marginal buckets on its lateral faces lying with the fluid pasv sage formed by the said pair of sections, said lower and intermediate sections having inlet ducts communicating with the channels therein, said upper and intermediate sections hav ing continuation inlet depressions therein registerable with'said inlet ducts to admit fluid into each fluidpassage at both sides of the rotor therein, said upper and intermediate sections also having outlet ducts communicating with the channels therein, and cooperata-ble stop means on said sections for diverting fluid in said passage'sinto adjacent fluid passages. L

j 20. In a multiple-stage rotary pump, an upper casing section, a lower casing section,

one or more intermediate casing sections of standard design positioned between said upper and lower sections, each-of said sections having one or more annular channels therein cooperatable with corresponding channels in adj acent casing' sections to form a plurality of axial fluid passages, a rotor between each pair of sections and having marginal buckets on its lateral faces lying with the fluid passage formed by the said pair of sections, said lower and intermediate sections having inlet ducts communicating with the channels therein, said upper and intermediate sections hav ing: continuation inlet depressions therein registerable with said inlet ducts to admit fluid intoeach fluid passage at both sides of the rotor therein, said upper and intermediate sections also having outlet ducts communicating with the channels therein, said lower andintermediate sections having continuation outletdepressions registerable with said outlet ducts forguiding fluid from both sides 7 of the rotors in said flnid passages, and cooperatable stop means on said sections for no diverting fluid in said passages into adjacent fluid passages. j

21. In a multiple-stage rotary pump, an upper casing section having an outlet, a lower casing section having an'inlet, one or more intermediate casing sections positioned between said upper and lower sections, a rotor between each pair of adjacent sections, each rotor having marginal buckets, each casing section being provided with annular channels having their lateral walls spaced from and cooperable with the said buckets to form pressure-developing passages, means to prevent escape of fluid radially inwardly between said rotors and the adjacent parts of said sections, and stop means in said channels for directing fluid from one passage to another and through said outlet.

22. In amultiple-stage rotary pump, an

having one or more annular channels therein upper casing section having an outlet, a-lower 13" casing sectionhaving an inlet, one or more intermediate casing sections positioned between said upper, and lower sections, said 'sections having annular channels, a rotor betweeneach pair of adjacent sections, each rotor having marginafbuckets facing toward and spaced from the lateral walls of, an adjacent channel, said channels and buckets e operating to form pressure-building paso sages, said rotors having running engagement with said sections radially inwardly of said channels, and stop means in said channels to direct fluid from one passage into another an out through said outlet.

In testimony whereof I affin my signature.

WALLACE; L. CLAYPOOLQ

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2773454 *Sep 18, 1951Dec 11, 1956Philipp HilgePump for liquid foods, drugs, and liquid chemicals
US3084850 *Apr 26, 1961Apr 9, 1963Baltimore Aircoil Co IncMultistage air moving device
US3135215 *Mar 5, 1963Jun 2, 1964Mechanical Tech IncRegenerative devices
US3188967 *May 26, 1961Jun 15, 1965Solar Aircraft CoFluid pressure booster
US5273394 *Sep 24, 1992Dec 28, 1993General Motors CorporationTurbine pump
EP1624191A1 *Aug 2, 2004Feb 8, 2006F.P.Z. Effepizeta SrlSide channel blower
WO2013010952A1 *Jul 13, 2012Jan 24, 2013Pedrollo S.P.A.Electropump
Classifications
U.S. Classification415/183, 415/55.4, D15/7, 415/55.6
International ClassificationF04D5/00
Cooperative ClassificationF04D5/006, F05B2250/503, F04D5/002
European ClassificationF04D5/00R2D, F04D5/00R