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Publication numberUS1876528 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 6, 1932
Filing dateJul 27, 1931
Publication numberUS 1876528 A, US 1876528A, US-A-1876528, US1876528 A, US1876528A
InventorsH. L. Walters
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Intebior building wall structure
US 1876528 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
Previous page
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Sept. 6, 1932. H. WALTERS 1,

INTERIOR BUILDING WALL STRUCTURE Filed July 27, 1931 s Sheets-Sheet 1 ATTORNEY- P 1932- H. L. WALTERS 1,876,528

INTERIOR BUILDING WALL STRUCTURE Filed July 27, 1951 Sheets-Sheet 2 f] i 2. .111 El. :1.

2 54 6 5/1 3 7 26 i; 23 7 s 25 2 48 5/ Q8 |t| w W 84 Q/4 /9 f4 25 1 1,41 7/ 40/ 44 75 45 b 2 j g 597 O r v V5 85.

Sept. 6, 1932. H. L. WALTERS 1,876,528

INTERIOR BUILDING WALL STRUCTURE Filed July 27. 1951 s Sheets-Sheet 5 ATTORNEYS Patented Sept. 6, 1932 PATIENT O FFICE HUGO L. WALTERS, OF CLEVELAND, OHIO INTERIOR IBIII'IIIZIDING' WALL STRUCTURE Application filed Iu1y 27, 1931.

This invention relates to interior building wall structures of metal.

It is an object of this invention to provide a new and improved metal wall structure 5 which will be light in weight and easil in- Serial No. 558,386.

Fig. 7 is a section taken substantially on the line 77 of Fig. 2;

Fig. 8 is a section taken substantially on the line 8-8 of Fig. 2' and Fig. 9 is a section talren substantially on stalled, but which will be sound proo and the line 99 of Fig. 2.

durable.

It is a further object to produce a structure which may be embodied as a removable par- 10 tition but which will give the appearance andhave the advantages of a solid wall structure.

It is a further object to provide a removable metal partition which when installed 16 will remain firmly in place, but will leave no scars upon the building when removed.

This invention is particularly useful for oflice buildings where it is desired to partition space to suit the individual tenant, and to 20 change the partitioning at will to meet new conditions or to suit different tenants. It is accordingly that embodiment of the invention which is chosen for illustration.

The invention accordingly comprises the 2 features of metal construction, combinations of elements, and arrangements of parts, which will be exemplified in the construction hereinafter set forth and the scope of the application of which will be indicated in the claims.

For a fuller understanding of the nature and objects of the invention, reference should be had to the following detailed description taken in connection with the accompanying drawings, in which Figure 1 is a perspective elevation of a room corner showing two forms of metal partition embodying this invention.

Figure 2 is a vertical section through a metal partition as shown on the left hand side of Figure 1.

Figure 3 is a vertical section through the partition shown'on the right hand side of Figure 1.

Figure 4 is a horizontal section on the line H in Figure 2.

Figure 5 is a horizontal section on the line 55 of Figure 3.

Figure 6 is a perspective detail of the re- 50 taining screw.

The construction shown in Figures 3 and 5, however, forms a part of copending appliggiion Serial Number 623,587, filed July 20,

Partition walls of metal can be economically constructed and installed but they are not sound proof and this is a serious drawback in offices. The use of building blocks of asbestos, gypsum and the like may be made to give a relative] good insulating partition, but it requires that the partition be built into place. This is expensive and disturbing to the office and requires a considerable time. Moreover, when such a partition is to be removed, it has to be wrec ed and discarded.

In accordance with this invention, I provide a metal partition which has the sound insulating properties combined with the ease of installation and removal referred to.

The direct passage of sound through a partition is dependent upon setting up a sympathetic resonance of the air waves on both sides of the partition, partly through crevices in or beside the partition and partly through vibration of the partition itself.

If a room be divided by a metal sheet, sound will be transmitted between the sides quite readily, because the partition itself acts as sounding board vibrating to the sound waves and transmits its motion partly directly to the air on the other side of the partition, and partly to the floor and ceilings which are set in vibration and in turn transmit this vibration to the air beyond the partition.

In accordance with this invention, I obtain the structural advantages of a stiff fiat metal sheet without the disadvantages of sound transmission.

In the drawings the numerals 10 and 11 represent the floor and ceiling of a room or floor of a building, respectively between which the partition is to extend.

The partition itself comprises a series of metal panels adapted to extend from the floor ill) to the ceiling, the panels being arranged to connect with each other to form any length of wall desired.

Referring to the construction illustrated 1n Figs. 2 and 4, each partitionpanel comprises a rectangular frame comprlsmg spaced metal upright members 12 preferably channelshaped in cross-section, a lower horizontal member 14, an upper horizontal member 19, and spaced intermediate horizontal members 18, all of said horizontal members extending between the upright members 12. The lower horizontal member 14 is preferably 1n the shape of an inverted channel 15 having its depending side flanges extending horizontally outwardly at 1616 and then upwardly to provide upwardly extending side flanges 1717 spaced outwardly from the depending sides of the inverted channel 15.

The upper horizontal member 19 is preferably channel-shaped in cross-section and has its flanges 21--21 extendin upwardly, as shown in Fig. 2. Similarly, t e intermediate cross members 18 are channel-shaped in crosssection and have their flanges 2020 extending upwardly. Furthermore, the flanges 21---21 and 20-20 preferably lie in the same plane as the side flanges 17-17 for receiving the side panels to be later described.

The vertical upright members 12 are supported on the lower horizontal members 14 and are secured thereto by angles 14 attached to the members 12 and 14 in any suitable manner. The ends of the horizontal members 18 and 19 are formed with narrowed tongue portions 12 which are bent upwardly to extend between the flanges of the upright members 12 and are rigidly secured to the webs cf the upright members 12, as indicated in Fig. 9.

The adjacent panel section may have, if desired, a corresponding upright member which may be secured to the uprightmember 12, or, if desired, the horizontal members may be secured directly to the upright member 12, as shown in Figs. 7 and 9.

The upper horizontal member 19 of the frame 13 carries a thrust bracket 22 adapted to receive a screw stud 23 and to transmit the thrust thereof to the frame 13. This thrust bracket preferably has two horizontal members 24 and 25, the member 24 being designed to embrace the threaded portion 26 of the stud 23, and the other member being slotted to receive an extended non-circular portion 27 of the stud 23, to permit the stud to move longitudinally but to prevent it from turning. The stud 23 is arranged to extend upwardly to exert pressure against the ceiling, and is provided with a nut 28 and a lock nut 29 for that purpose.

At the top of the partition there is provided a top horizontal member 30 similar in shape to the lower member 14 of the frame 13 but inverted with respect thereto, and havnet/ease ing downwardly extending ends 31 and 310 corresponding to the ends 17 and 17a. The stud 23 is adapted to bear against the central portion 32 of the member 30.

In order to cause a continuous tight fitting between the partition and the fioor and ceiling and walls and at the same time prevent sound vibrations from being transmitted to the floor and ceiling and walls from the partition, a cushioning means is provided at both top, bottom and ends which is sufiiciently'flexible and adjustable relative to the frame 13 to lie flat against the floor or ceiling throughout its length.

This cushion member is substantially the same for both floor and ceiling and comprises blocks 33 and 34 of a shape to fit within the channel 15 and within the corresponding channel in the member 30, and to extend outwardly beneath the flat portion 16 and 16a to prevent contact between the members 14 and 30 and the fioor and ceiling respectively. These blocks 33 and 34 have each a member 35 or 36 lying flat upon their tops, in position to be engaged by screws 37 and 38, threaded within the members 14 and 30 respectively. A plurality of these screws are provided at spaced intervals, throughout the length of the members 14 and 30. The blocks 33 and 34 may be made of any suitable elastic material, as for example, felt or rubber, and the screws 37 and 38 are adapted to hold the elastic materlal in contact with the floor or ceiling throughout its length.

With the above construction, it will be clear that the frame 13 may be installed by first adjusting the screws 37 at the bottom to bring the lower cushion in thorough contact with the floor; then by adjusting the screws 38 to bring the upper cushion parallel to the face of the ceiling; whereupon the nuts 28 and 29 may be forced downwardly upon the studs 23 to exert pressure between the cushions and the floor and ceiling, thereby holding the frame firmly in place without marking the floor or ceiling.

Sheet metal members 39, comprising a face 40, provided with an adjoining insulating material such as asbestos or felt slabs 41 for sound deadening purposes, are attached to the frame 13, one of said sheet metal members 39 being upon each side of the frame and attached thereto.

A practical means of attaching is illustrated comprising bracket members 42 having a portion 43 preferably in contact with and attached to the back of the metal facing and having a metal hook portion 44 ex tending through the insulating member 41 in position to cooperate with the upstanding end 20 of the bracket 18, it being understood that similar metal hooks connect with each of the members 17, 17a, 20a, 21 and 21a, one only being described. An insulating member 45, as for example, of felt, may be used to surround the upper end of the upstanding member 20 to afford a firm mechanical sound insulated connection, between the upstanding portion 20 and the bracket 42.

With this construction, it will be clear that although the faces 40 of the two opposite metal sheet members are firmly connected together by means of the hooks 42 and the member 18, that the continuity of the connection for purposes of sound transmission is broken at both insulating points to prevent or minimize the transmission of sound from one face to the other, and that a dead air pocket is provided to further break up sound vibrations further assisted by insulation 41 which absorbs vibrations and deadens sound caused by external contact.

At the top of the partition there may be provided auxiliary sheet metal members 46 adapted to cover the space between the top of the sheet members 39 and the ceiling; these sheet members 46 are also of a metal facing p 47 and an insulating member 48 similar to the sheet members 39.

Brackets 49, having hook portions 50, embrace the ends 31 and 31a of the ceiling member 30, while another bracket 51, also extending through the insulating member 48, is adapted to engage the top of the sheet member 39 to retain the lower end of the sheet member 46 in place. Brackets 52 and 53 may be placed at the top and bottom of the partition to receive a metal ceiling trim 54 and a metal base board trim 55 respectively.

As illustrated in Figure 4, a vertical member 60 and cushion 60a may be provided having the general shape and contour of the member 30 and cushion member 34 respectively for the purpose of filling in between the edge of the metal panel and the side wall. This vertical member 60 may be carried by the frame 13 of the partition and screws 61a presls the cushion member 61 against the side wal Auxiliary metal sheet members 62 are arranged to cover the space between the sheet members of the main panel and the wall. They are supported by metal brackets 63 engaging projecting ends 64 of the member 60 as has been described for the brackets 43. A fillet 64a may be used in the corner if desired.

A hook shape metal bracket 66 is attached to one of the sheet members of one panel and a similar bracket 67 is attached to the adjacent metal sheet member of the other panel. The bracket 66 is of a shape to extend over and engage the flange 65a of the upright 12 of the frame 13 but it is separated therefrom by an insulating strip 68 and the bracket 67 is of a shape to extend over and engage the bracket 66. In this manner the metal sheet members are firmly attached to the framework, but for purposes of sound transmission they are thoroughly insulated from it. -A

frame 69 may be employed to cover the joint between the sheet members, having inner projections 69a, adapted to spring over the ends of a C shaped support 691), which is firmly attached to one of the panels.

In the construction of Figure 3, the wall consists primaril of two surface metal sheet members 70 and 1 and an intermediate sheet member 72, each comprising a metal face 73 and an insulating member as of asbestos felt 74. A frame 75 is rovided between each two sheet members. Each is in most respects similar to the corresponding frame 13, save that one tsiiie of the frame 75, which is adapted to be toward the outer sheet member 70 or 71, is provided with means for attachment to the sheet member while that side which is toward the intermediate member 72 is adapted to rest against said member 72 to held it in place.

To accomplish this result, the frame 75 is rovided with abottom member 76 similar to the member 14 and at the top of the panel there is provided a top member 77 similar to the member 30. The member 76, however, is provided at its outer side with a channel 78 in position to receive the sheet member 74 and the member 77 is provided with a channel 79 adapted to receive a top sheet member 80 corresponding to the sheet member 48 of the previous modification.

Brackets 81 and 82 intermediate of the frame 75 have ends 83 and 84 corresponding to the projections 20 and 21 on the members 18 and 19 respectively, save that in this modi-' fication the upstanding ends 83 and 84 may directly engage the brackets 85 and 86 respectively without the necessity of intermediate insulation and in a similar way the channels 78 and 79 may directly receive their sheet members respectively, since as will be hereinafter brought out, the intermediate member 72 forms a complete insulation between one face of the partition and the other.

The inner end of the members 76 and 77 and of the brackets 81 and 82 respectively is bent to form a flat face designated generally at 87, to rest against the intermediate sheet member 72 and retain the latter in place. This intermediate sheet member 72 has two sliding sections 72 and 88 to make it adjustable to varying heights of buildings and these are held together after adjustment in any convenient manner.

In accordance with this embodiment of the invention, it will be seen that the intermediate insulating sheet member is held in place by the two frameworks 75 and that the outer or surface sheet members are held in place respectively by attachment to the two frameworks.

It will be understood that the members 76 and 77 are adapted to cooperate with cushion blocks 90 and 91 in the same manner that the plates 14 and 30 cooperate with the cushion blocks 33 and 34, through the medium of screws 92 and 93'.

As will be seen from Figure 5, vertical members 95 may be provided of cross section Si nilar to the cross section of the members 76, having fiat inner faces 96 to engage the face of the intermediate members 72 and having outwardly projecting portions 97 adapted to engage hooks 98 similar to the hooks 63 before described. Cushion blocks 99 cooperate with the members 95 and screws 99a perform the function heretofore described for the screws 61a.

Attaching to one panel is a bracket 101 having an extending portion adapted to extend behind and furnish support to the adjacent rear face of the adjacent panel as shown at 102 and to hook around and be supported by the flanges of the upright 100 of the frame 75. The upright 100 has also a horizontal projecting flange 105 adapted to rest against the inner sheet member 72 and to be embraced by a hook 106 carried by said inner sheet member. The hook 107 which embraces the projection 105 on at least one of the panels 7 0 or 71 is separated from the projection 105 by an insulating member 108 to prevent the direct sound transmission from one panel to the other. The hooks 106 and 107 thus serve to hold the panels together.

The construction of Figure 7 may be employed to join the panel to the framework at any point desired and to efiect a secure but sound-insulating connection. For example, if it is desired firmly to attach the panel 71 to the upright 100, we may provide an opening 114 considerably larger than the bolt 115 with which the parts are to be joined. Into this opening 114 is inserted an insulating Washer 116 of lead or felt or other sound insulating material of a shape to receive the compressive force of the bolt, but to prevent direct contact between the bolt and the panel.

By the above construction, it will be seen that an efiicient economical partition is devised which may be conveniently made out of inexpensive structural materials, such as sheet metal and asbestos or felt insulation which, nevertheless, will be substantially sound proof because it does not afford any direct means of sound transmission between one face of the partition and the other face and any resonating effect in their face is dampened by its immediate contact with the sound insulating material. Moreover, by reason of the cushion effect in the contact with the floor, the ceiling and the side walls, not only is a tight joint made to prevent direct sound transmission through orifices, but also such resonating effect which may take place in the partitions is not transmitted to the floor and such resonating effect as may take place in the floor itself, is dampened by the cushion.

It will be understood that the outer faces of the partition may be painted, papered,

amaze treated with a plastic finishing composition or finished in any other manner desired or the panel may be supplied ready for erection already finished upon its interior. Moreover, while I have suggested the making of the panel of metal and asbestos, this is in part for purposes of economy and convenience and it is within the broad scope of this invention to employ other dampening materials, such for example as felt.

Since certain changes may be made in the above construction and different embodiments of the invention could be made without departing from the scope thereof, it is intended that all matter contained in the above description or shown in the accompanying drawings shall be interpreted as illustrative and not in a limiting sense.

It is also to be understood that the following claims are intended to cover all of the generic and specific features of the invention herein described, and all statements of the scope of the invention, which, as a matter of language, might be said to fall therebetween.

Having described my invention, what I claim as new and desire to secure by Letters Patent, is

1.-A removable metal partition for dividing a room, comprising a rigid metal framework, including upright members and horizontal members, the uppermost and lowermost of said horizontal members being insulated from the ceiling and floor of the room and the endmost of said upright members being insulated from the adjoining walls of the room, thereby to dampen and substantially prevent the transmission of vibrations to said framework, and metal side panels removably supported from said horizontal members and being completely insulated therefrom to prevent metal-to-metal contact therebetween.

2. A removable metal partition, comprising a rigid metal framework, removable metal panels for the opposite sides of said framework, means carried by said panels for supporting the same on said framework, and insulating means disposed between all points of engagement between said supporting means and framework and between said panels and framework, whereby no metal-tometal contact between said panels and framework is obtained.

3. A removable metal partition, comprising a rigid metal framework including upright members and horizontal members, the endmost of said upright members being insulated from the vertical walls of a room to be divided, the upper and lower horizontal members being insulated from the ceiling and floor of the room, metal side panels at opposite sides of said framework, means for removably supporting said side panels from certain of said horizontal members, and nonmetallic sound insulating means disposed between said metal side panels and said upright and horizontal members, whereby no metalto-metal contact is made between said side panels and said upright and horizontal members.

4. A metal partition comprising a rigid metal framework, non-metallic v1brat1on dampening means extending completely around and having continuous contact w1th the peripheral surfaces of said framework, and arranged to have continuous contact with the walls, ceiling and floor of the buildmg in which the paf'tltion is to be positioned to dampen and substantially prevent the transmission of vibrations to said framework, metal side panels supported from the op 0- site sides of said framework, means insu ating said side panels from said framework to obviate metal contact therebetween, said panels also having continuous sealed contact with said framework to substantially prevent the passage of sound between the same and said framework.

5. A metal partition comprising a rigid metal framework, non-metallic dampening means extending completely around and having continuous contact with the peripheral surfaces of said framework, and arranged to have continuous contact with the walls, ceiling and floor of the building in which the partition is to be positioned to dampen and substantially prevent the transmission of v1- brations to said framework, means carried by said framework 'to firmly and continuously press said dampening means continuously throughout its length into intimate contact with the walls, ceiling and floor, metal side panels supported from the opposite sides of said framework, means insulating said side panels from said framework to obviate metal contact therebetween, said panels also having continuous sealed contact with said framework to substantially prevent the passage of sound between the same and said framework.

'6. A metal partition comprising a rigid framework including spaced upright members of a length less than the height of the walls of a room in which said partition is to be positioned, and upper and lower cross members extending between said upright members, insulating means having vibration dampening characteristics interposed between and having continuous engagement with the upright members and the walls of the room and between said upper and lower members and the ceiling and floor respectively of the room to substantially prevent the transmission of vibrations to said partition,and metal side panels supported from opposite sides of said framework, said panels having continuously sealed non-metallic engagement with said framework.

7. A metal partition comprising a rigid means carried by metal framework including upright members and horizontal members, insulating means having vibration dampening characteristics extending the full length of the uppermost and lowermost of said horizontal members, means carried by said framework for forcing said insulating means throughout the entire length thereof into intimate contact with the fioor and ceiling of a room in which the partition is to be located, said insulating means having continuous sealed engagement with said uppermost and lowermost horizontal members, side panels supported from opposite sides of said framework and insulating means between said framework and side panels to obviate metal-to-metal contact therebetween, said panels having continuous sealed engagement with said uppermost and lowermost horizontal members and with the endmost of said upright members.

8. A metal partition comprising a rigid metal framework including upright members and horizontal members, compressible insulating means extending the full length of said framework for supporting the same on a floor, means carried by the framework for forcing said insulating means into continuous sealed engagement with the floor, said insulating means having continuous sealed engagement with the lower of said horizontal members, a second compressible insulating and extending the full length of said framework in continuous sealed engagement with the upper of said horizontal members, means for forcing said second insulating means into continuous sealed engagement with a ceiling, metal side panels at opposite sides of said framework, means for supporting said side panels from said framework, and non-metallic insulating means between said last means and framework, said side panels also having non-metallic continuous sealed engagement with said lower and upper horizontal members.

9. A metal partition comprising a rigid metal framework including upright members and horizontal members, compressible insulating means extending the full length of said framework for supporting the same on a floor, means carried by the framework for forcingsaid insulating means into continuous sealed engagement with the floor, said insulating means having continuous sealed engagement with the lower of said horizontal members, a second compressible insulating means carried by and extending the full length of said framework in continuous sealed engagement with the upper of said horizontal members, means for forcing said second insulating means into continuous sealed engagement with a ceiling, insulating means extending in full length continuous engagement with the endmost of said upright members for continuous sealed engagement with the walls of a room, metal side panels at opposite sides of said framework, means for supporting said side panels from sald framework, and non-metallic insulatlng means between said last means and framework, said side panels also having non-metallic continuous sealed engagement with said lower and upper horizontal members and with the endmost of said upright members.

10. A metal partition comprising a rigid framework having a lower inverted horizontal channel, upright members supported thereby, cross members extending between said upright members, and an upper channel supported by said framework, a compressible vibration dampening element extending into said lower channel the full length thereof for supporting said channel out of contact with a floor, means carried by said lower channel to force said dampening element into continuous sealed engagement with the floor, a second compressible vibration dampening element mounted in said upper channel the full length thereof, means carried by said upper channel for forcing said second dampening element into continuous sealed engagement with a ceiling, both said dampening elements having continuous sealed engagement with their respective channels, and metal side panels secured as opposite sides of said framework.

11. A metal partition comprising a rigid framework having a lower inverted horizontal channel, upright members supported thereby, cross members extending between said upright members, and an upper channel supported by said framework, a compressible vibration dampenin element extending into said lower channel t 1e full length thereof for supporting said channel out of contact with a floor, means carried by said lower channel to force said dampening element into continuous sealed engagement with the floor, a second compressible vibration dampening element mounted in said upper channel the full length thereof, means carried by said upper channel for forcing said second dampcning element into continuous sealed engagement with a ceiling, both said dampening elements having continuous sealed engagement with their respective channels, metal side panels supported from opposite sides of said framework, and non-metallic means insulating said side panels from all metallic engagement with said frame, said side panels having sealed continuous engagement with said channel members.

12. A removable metal partition comprising a rigid metal framework including upright members and horizontal members, the endmost of said upright members being insulated from the vertical walls of a room to be divided, the upper and lower horizontal members being insulated from the ceiling and floor of the room, metal side panels at opposite sides of said framework, means for rereverses movably supporting said side panels from certain of said horizontal members, and nonmetallic sound insulating means disposed between said metal side panels and said upright and horizontal members, whereby no metal-to-metal contact is made between said side panels and said upri ht and horizontal members, said side panels aving continuous sealed engagement with at least the endmost of'said upright members and the uppermost and lowermost of said horizontal members.

13. A removable metal partition, comprising a self-sustaining rigid metal framework including upright members and horizontal members, certain of said horizontal members having upwardly extending side flanges, removable metal panels at opposite sides of said framework and having hooked members engageable with said flanges for supporting said panels from said horizontal members, non-metallic, vibration-insulating means between said hook members and flanges, a nonmetallic, vibration-insulating means between said panels and framework to prevent metalto-metal contact therebetween, said panels having sealed engagement with at least the endmost of said upright members and with at least the uppermost and lowermost of said horizontal members.

14. A removable metal partition for dividing a room, comprising a rigid metal framework, including upright members and horizontal members, the uppermost and lowermost of said horizontal members being insulated from the ceiling and floor of the room and the endmost ofsaid .upright members being insulated from the ad Qining walls of the room, thereby to dampen and substantial ly prevent the transmission of vibrations to said framework, metal side panels at opposite sides of said framework and being insulated therefrom, means for supporting said panels from said horizontal members, and means insulating said last means from said horizontal members to prevent metal contact therebetween.

15. A removable metal partition for dividing a room, comprising a rigid metal framework, including upright members and horizontal members, the uppermost and lowermost of said horizontal members being in sulated from the ceiling and floor of the room and the endmost of said upright members being insulated from the adjoinin walls of the room, thereby to dampen an substantially prevent the transmission of vibrations to said framework, metal side panels at opposite sides of said framework, sound absorbing material between said panels and framework, means for supporting said panels from said horizontal members, and nonmetallic means insulating said supporting means from said horizontal members.

16. A removable metal dpartition, comprising a self-sustaining rigi metal framework including upright members and horizontal members, certain of said horizontal members having upwardly extending side flanges, re movable metal panels at opposite sides of said framework and having hooked members engageable with said flanges for supporting said panels from said horizontal members, non-metallic insulating means between said hook members and flanges, and non-metallic insulating means between said'panels and framework to prevent metal-to-metal contact therebetween.

17. A building wall comprising a rigid framework, metal panels for the opposite sides of said framework, means for suspending said metal panels from said framework in non-contacting spaced relation, insulating means disposed between said framework and suspending means whereby no metal-to-metal contact is obtained between said metal panels and framework, and insulating means disposed between the panels and extending substantially throughout the area of the wall.

18. A metal wall for dividing a room comprising a rigid framework, insulation material having vibration dampening characteristics for insulating said framework from the ceiling and floor of the room, metal panels for the opposite sides of said framework, means for suspending said metal panels from said framework in non-contacting spaced re lation, and insulating means disposed between said framework and suspending means whereby no metal-to-metal contact is obtained between said metal panels and framework.

19. A metal wall for dividing a room comprising a framework including rigid cross members, insulation material having vibration dampening characteristics for insulating said framework from the ceiling and floor of the room, metal panels for the opposite sides of said framework, means for suspending said metal panels from said framework in non-contacting spaced relation, insulating means disposed between said framework and suspending means whereby no metal-tometal contact is obtained between said metal panels and framework, and non-metallic insulation material disposed in the spaces between said panels and framework.

In testimony whereof I affix mv signature.

HUGO L. WALTERS.

Referenced by
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Classifications
U.S. Classification52/243.1, 52/508, 52/481.2
International ClassificationE04B2/82
Cooperative ClassificationE04B2/821, E04B2/82, E04B2002/7494
European ClassificationE04B2/82B, E04B2/82