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Publication numberUS1876758 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 13, 1932
Filing dateJan 23, 1930
Priority dateSep 10, 1927
Also published asUS1745057, US1830292
Publication numberUS 1876758 A, US 1876758A, US-A-1876758, US1876758 A, US1876758A
InventorsRomine Robert T
Original AssigneeMaterial Handling Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Method and apparatus for shipping metal
US 1876758 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Sept. 13, 1932. v R. T. ROMINE 1,876,758

umnon AND APPARATUS FOR SHIPPING METAL Original Filed Oct. 20, 1928 fibez l 2710/2 [/79 Patented Sept. 13, 1932 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFRICE ROBERT T. RoMINE, or MOUNT CLEMENS, MicmGAN, ASSIGNOR T0 mammal. mn- DLING, INQ, OF WILMINGTON, DELAWARE, A CORPORATION OF DELAWARE METHOD AND APPARATUS'FOR SHIPPING METAL Original application. filed October 20, 1928, Serial No. 313,846, now Patent No. 1,745,057, dated January 28, 1930. Divided and this application filed January 23, 1930. Serial No. 422,845.

This invention relates to the loading and shipping or transporting of material, such as sheet, strip or bar metal on railway cars or other carriers.

Th8 present application is a division of my copeuding application, Serial No. 313,846, filed October 20, 1928, now Patent No. 1,745,057, granted January 28, 1930, and more particularly as to Figures 7 and 8 of said patent.

An object of the invention is to provide a method and apparatus for loading or packing the metal, such as sheet, strip or bar steel, on the floor of a freight car or carrier for transportation in .relatively heavy units and in such manner as to prevent or resist such relative shifting movement of the constituent parts of the packs or bundles as would result in damage to the freight car, damage to the material, and render diflicult and expensive the removal or unloading of the j metal at destination. p

A further object of the invention is to provide a new and efficient method, as well as an apparatus for carrying out the method, for shipping sheet, strip or bar metal in packs whereby resistance to the relative sliding or shifting movement of the parts of the pack during transit is obtained through the medium offriction material causing a binding or frictional action on the parts Within the pack, or within the cross sectional area thereof.

In accordance with the present invention, the sheet, strip or. bar metal, which is shipped in large quantities from steel or rolling mills to automobile manufacturers and others is transported on the floor of a freight caror carrier in heavy packs or bundles, such as packs weighing from five to ten' tons, and the constituent parts of the pack which are preferably arranged flatwise, in part or in whole are held together by the application of friction interiorly of the pack or within the cross sectional area thereof. This may be done by interposing relatively softer friction material between thefadjacent sheets, strips or bars, such as relatively soft Wood strips. The metal parts ofthe pack aremaintained, preferably by substantial pressure, against this friction material. This pressure may be obtainedthrough the weight of the metal, through the medium of the binding or bracing elements, or both.

Moreover, the invention enables a pack to be madeup of several smaller units or stacks, and at the same time transported effectually by resisting relative shifting of the units within the bundle or pack as a whole. For

instance, a bundle may be made up of metal sheets of several different widths, or simply of narrow sheets or strips arranged in individual piles according to width within the bundle as a whole. These sheets are preferably arranged with their inner edges abutting or in opposed relation, with friction material interposed therebetween, so that frictional l resistance can thus be applied to the sheet or strip edges interiorly of the bundle, or within the cross sectional area thereof.

the shipment of unit packs made up of a plurality of piles or sections superimposed one upon the other, and in which the piles or sections can'be made up of stacks of sheets of different heats, the sections being separated by relatively softer frictional material. In this instance the invention provides forthe maintaining of the sections or layers together through preferably a common medium for frictional resistance while also maintaining the individual stacks of any sectiontogether through frictional resistance within the cross sectional area of the bundle as a whole.

Other objects of this invention will appear in the following description and appended claims,-reference being had to the accom panying drawing forming a part of this specification wherein like referencecharacters designate corresponding parts in the sev eral figures.

Figure 1 is a side. elevational view, and

Figure 2 is a vertical sectional view on substantially the line 2-2 of Figure 1.

Furthermore, the invention'provides for terms of the several claims hereto appendedas considered in view of the prior art and the requirements thereof. J'

The handling of sheet, strip and bar metal, such as steel, and the shipment of this material in freight cars or carriers have in the past been accomplished at great expense, not

v only to the-steel mills and consumers, such as automobile companies, but also to the railroads. Not only has the labor expense in loading or unloading the cars been very great, on account of manualhandling of the metal, but the time required to load and unload the cars has resulted in tying up cars on the railroad sidings, causing congestion and frequently impeding production. One of the serious disadvantages to previous methods employed in transporting this metal has been on account of the enormous damage to freight cars as well as damage to the material due to the shifting of the metal in transit, particularly in the case of sheet metal. Freight cars are subjected in transit to shocks, blows and collisions, frequently resulting in impacts at as much as twenty miles per hour. \Vhere the sheet, strip or bar metal is loaded on the car floor in accordance with previous practice violent displacement of the bars of sheets or steel strips frequently resulted when the car received a shock or blow. and the bars were often driven a gainst the ends or the side walls of the car with great force. This resulted in considerable damage to the cars, as well as to the metal, even in ramming holes through the end walls of the car. The tendency of sheet, strip. and bar steel to shift is, of course, aided by the fact that the surfaces are usually provided with an oily, rust preventative coating, causing the metal to slide very readily.

In the drawing. the invention is illustrated as applied to the loading and. shipping of metal sheets or strip metal, although it will be understood that the latter are simply illus-- trative of material for which the invention is intended, and that the same is also applicable to bars as shown in my co-pending application above mentioned.

Referring to Figures 1 and 2, the pack as a whole is made up of a plurality of sections or stacks superimposed one upon the other and separated by means of transverse strips, preferably of wood. These sections or groups may be of different heights or thicknesses and one of the advantages of forming the pack this way is to enable different heats at the steel mill to be separated, and also in enabling the pack to be made up of sheets of different sizes. In the example shown in Figures 1 and 2, the pack is made Also it is to be.

. two parts or stacks L and L which comprise narrower sheets or strips. Inter-posed between the stacks L and L are a series of longitudinally spaced relatively thin wood strips 27. Superimposed upon the lower section of the pack is a section or stack K, which is separated from the stacks L and L by means of one or more transverse wood strips 28 forming a space 33. The stack K is illustrated by way of example, as composed of sheets of the full width of the pack, and superimposed thereupon is another section comprising stacks M and M of different. width metal sheets or strips. The stacks M and M are separated from each other by means of a series of vertical wood strips 29 spaced longitudinally of the pack. The stacks M and M are also vertically spaced from the stack K by means of one or more transverse wood strips or bars 30 forming a space 34.

The pack, such as shown in Figures 1 and 2, is preferably formed and bound as a ship ping unit at the steel mill preparatory to being loaded in the car for transportation. The pack may be formed on a suitable loading buck or platform and carried directly into the car as by means of a power driven industrial truck, or it may be formed in the car, if desired. As illustrated in Figures 1 and 2 the pack is bound together or braced by means of binding units each including a pair of upright wood members 36 and 37 ositioned at opposite sides of the pack.

hese members are drawn into engagement with the opposite outer edges of the sheets of the several sections of the pack by means of a series of vertically spaced wire binding elements, each element comprising in the present instance a plurality of wires such as three of required gauge and tensile strength. The members 36 and 37 project above and below the pack, and their lower ends are connected by means of a wire binding element 38 which may be tightened at its ends either by twisting or in any other manner by a suitable tightening device. A similar wire binding element 39 extends through the space 33, a wire binding element 40 extends through the space 34, and a wire binding element 41 extends transversely above the pack. All of these binding elements -extend around the wood members 36 and 37, and are ti ghtencd under sutiicient tension to force the wood members 36 and 37 under considerable pressure against-the outer edges of the sheets. By drawing the vertical wood members 36 and 37 inwardly against the pack not only at the ends thereof but at intermediate points. very substantial pressure may be obtained without breaking or bowing the wood, and since the sheets or strips have plus or minus variations in width the irregular edges thereof may be embedded in the wood members 33 and .37 so that considerable frictional resistance is obtained in this manner.

Any number of these binding units may-be v employed on a pack depending upon the length or size of the pack, two being shown ,in the present instance in Figure 1, adjacent opposite ends of the pack. Interpose-d bea tween each wire binding element and the wood members 36 and 37 are 'sheet metal angles 42 which act as bearing pieces between the wire and wood uprights to prevent the wire cutting through the wood. These angle plates 42 may be grooved transversely to receive the Wire strands.

From the foregoing it will be seen that the inward pressure of the wood members 36 and 37 will force the sheets M and M into embedding engagement with the friction material 29, and will also force the sheets L and L into embedding engagement withthe friction material 27. From this it will be seen that the stacks M and M as well as the stacks L and L will be held together. by frictional I 5 resistance, and the constituent parts thereof, as well as the sheets forming the stack K,

will be held against substantial relative shifting movement during transit by frictional resistance through the medium of relatively softer material engaging opposite edges of the sheets or strips. This frictional resistance on the inner edges of the sheets of the stacks M, M and L, L is obtained interiorly of the pack or bundle through the medium of the wood strips 27 and 29.

The pack.- as shown in Figures 1 and 2. when loaded in the freight car is supported during its floating movement back and forth on the car floor and maintaining aisle spaces at opposite sides of the pack so that it can be removed at destination in the manner referred to above. Relative movement between the pack and pallet may be prevented in any suitable manner. In the present instance, the wires 38 oining the lower ends of theverticals 36 are adjacent the cross members 32 and resist sliding movement of the pack on the pallet. Other means may be used, of course, to prevent relative sliding movement or tilting, since obviously the pack .may be tied to the pallet if desired.

. It will be seen from the foregoing that I have provided a method and apparatus "softer-material than the metal.

skids 31 and the floor, causing by maintaining the pack in proper position whereby sheet, strip and bar metal may be transported in freight cars or carriers while minimizing the tendency of the metal parts to shiftor break loose from the bundles or packs. The internal friction which is applied to the metal parts is preferably obtained through the medium of relatively On account of the fact that some variations usually occur notonly in the width of the sheets, but also in the size of the bar or strip stock, particularly where the mills are allowed a slight percentage of variations, the binding action between the friction material and the metal is increased by virtue of this fact. The slight irregular surfaces of the metal, at the edges or corners thereof, will cause the friction ma.- terial to be embedded therein. This effects a clamping or binding action between the friction material and the metal, thereby resisting relative ,movement of the sheets,

strips or bars during transit. When the car is subjected to a shock or blow, the inertia of the pack will overcome the frictional resistance between the supporting members or the pack to shift longitudinally. The impact against the car, however, will not result in the sheets, bars or strips shifting .a substantial dlstance within the pack since the frictional resistance internally of the pack, as well as preferably externally also, between the metal and the frictional material will be greater than the frictional resistance between the supporting members and the car floor.

It will be understood that the packs may be carried as units into the car, or may be formed in the car, as desired. The constituent parts may be carried to the car by means of a power drivenindustrial truck and the term ffreight car as used throughout the specification and claims is intended to cover any transporting medium. As illustrated in F lgure 1, the packs are arranged in spacedrelation to the end wall C of the car, and also are spaced from the side walls so as to be free for shifting movement during transit, as explained in my Patent No. 1,650,540, granted 'November 22, 1927. Q l

I claim:

1. The hereindescribed method of shipping sheet, strip or bar metal in relatively heavy unit packs on a freight car floor, which consists informing a stack having its parts superimposed one upon another, disposing between the surfaces of said superimposed adjacent parts relatively softer material, such as wood, binding the pack as a unit and then positioning tlie pack with the'parts arranged flatwise upon the car floor whereby said sheets are held against substantial shifting movement due to their frictional engagement with said material.

2. A unit pack of sheet, bar or strip metal having the parts arranged. flatwise one upon another and having the pack divided into .aplurality of superimposed sections by -interposed relatively softer material, such as wood, engaging the horizontal surfaces of 5 the superimposed sheets and binding means encircling the pack whereby the sheets constituting the sections are held against substantial shifting movement due to their positive frictional engagement with said material.

3. The hereindescribed method of shipping sheet, or strip metal in relatively heavy unit packs on a freight car floor, which consists in arranging the sheets fiatwise one upon another on the car floor, inserting between superimposed groups thereof pieces of relatively softer material so as to form superimposed sub-units with the softer material engaging the horizontal surface of the sheets,

and binding the sheets into a unit pack whereby the sheets are held against substantial shifting movement. due to their positive engagement with said material.

4. The hereindescribed method of shipping sheet, bar or strip metal in relatively heavy unit packs on a freightcar floor, which consists in arranging the parts flatwise one upon another on the car floor, inserting between superimposed groups thereof pieces of relatively softer material and thereby forming superimposed sub-units, and binding the parts into a unit pack by means extending through the. pack between the parts whereby the sheets are held against substantial shifting movement due to their frictional engagement with said material;

' 5. The hereindescribed method of shipping sheet, bar or strip-metal in relatively heavy unit packs on a freight car floor, which consists in arranging the parts flatwise one upon another on the car floor, inserting between superimposed groups thereof pieces of relatively softer material, such as wood, binding the sheets into a unit pack by means which includes ties extending through the pack be tween the superimposed parts and uprights connected with said ties whereby the sheets are held against substantial shifting movement due to their frictional engagement with said material. i

T (3. The hereindescribed method of shipping sheet, bar or strip metal in relatively heavy unit packs on a freight car floor, which con- 55 sists in arranging the parts fiatwise one upon another on the car floor, inserting between superimposed layers or groupsthereof pieces of relatively softer material, such as wood, binding the parts into a unit pack by means 60 which includes the cross ties extending through the pack between the parts, and uprights connected with said ties and having relatively softer material engaging the edges of' the shects'whereby the sheets are held against substantial shifting movement due to their frictional engagement with said material.

7. A unit shipping pack of sheet, bar or strip metal comprising constituent parts arranged fiatwise one upon another, spacing members of relatively softer material disposed between the parts and dividing the pack between superimposed sheets'into a plurality of sub-units, and binding means encircling the pack whereby said sheets are held against substantial shiftingmovement due to their frictional engagement with said material.

8. A unit shipping pack of sheet, bar or strip metal comprising constituent parts arranged one upon another, spacing members of relatively softer material disposed between the superimposed parts and dividing the pack into a plurality of superimposed sub-units, and binding means encircling the pack and extending therethrough between the constituent parts whereby said sheets are held against substantial shifting movement due to their frictional engagement with said material. 9.0

9. The hereindescribed method of shipping sheet, strip or bar metal in relatively heavy packs on a freight car floor which consists in arranging the parts of a pack one upon another, dividing the pack into a plurality of superimposed sub-units by interposi'ng relatively softer material, such as wood, between the'parts and in frictional engagement with adjacent surfaces, arranging uprights at the outer edges ofthepack, and tying together said uprights by cross ties extending through the pack between said sub-units whereby the sheets are forced into embedding engagement with said material to prevent shifting of the sheets relative to the car floor.

10. The hereindescribed method of shipping sheet, strip or bar metal in relatively heavy packs on a freight car floor, which consists in arranging the parts of a pack flatwise one upon another. dividing the pack into a plurality of superimposed sub-units by interposing relatively softer material, such as wood, between the superimposed parts and in frictional engagement with adjacent surfaces, 115 arranging at the outer edges of the pack up; rights having relatively softer material, suclf as wood, in engagement with the edges of the constituent parts, and tying together said uprights by cross ties extending through the pack between said sub-units whereby the sheets are forced into embedding engagement with said material to prevent shifting of the sheets relative to the car floor.

' In testimony whereof I have hereunto set 12 my hand.

ROBERT T. ROMINE.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2453626 *Oct 2, 1944Nov 9, 1948Carnegie Illinois Steel CorpTransportation load and method of preparing the same
US2780354 *Apr 26, 1954Feb 5, 1957Bethlehem Steel CorpProtective package for the shipment of rods
US2985350 *Nov 6, 1958May 23, 1961Taccolini EugeneRemovable car top carrier
US3900116 *Sep 5, 1972Aug 19, 1975Exxon Nuclear Co IncFuel element shipping shim for nuclear reactor
US6050761 *Dec 24, 1997Apr 18, 2000Keip; Charles P.Shipping container system for stabilizing flexible loads
US6152663 *May 10, 1999Nov 28, 2000Keip; Charles P.Shipping system for stabilizing flexible loads
US6264410Feb 14, 2000Jul 24, 2001Charles P. KeipShipping container system for stabilizing flexible loads
Classifications
U.S. Classification410/40, 410/46, 206/449, 414/800
International ClassificationB61D45/00
Cooperative ClassificationB61D45/002
European ClassificationB61D45/00B1