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Publication numberUS1877424 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 13, 1932
Filing dateJun 4, 1929
Priority dateJun 4, 1929
Publication numberUS 1877424 A, US 1877424A, US-A-1877424, US1877424 A, US1877424A
InventorsEdgar Fear Harry
Original AssigneeNew Castle Refractories Compan
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Crank
US 1877424 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Sept. 13, 1932. H 5 FEAR 1,877,424

' CRANK Filed June 4, 1929 I j, v 111916,

INVENTOR. HA/mv 5. F560? BY 43 #M ATTORNEY Patented Sept. 13, 1932 UETED STATES HARRY EDGAR- FEAR, OF LAKEWOOD, OHIO, ASSIGNOR TO NEW CASTLE BEFRACTOBIES COMPANY, OF NEW CASTLE,v PENNSYLVANIA, A CORPORATION OF DELAWARE CRANK Application filed June 4, 1929. Serial No. 368,234.

The present invention relates to cranks for supporting ceramic pieces while the latter are being fired, and is especially designed for supporting flat table ware. The general object of my invention is to provide an improved form of crank or dish setter which is characterized by novel provisions for preventing warping of the crank while being dried during its manufacture, for directly exposing substantially all portions of the ware piece supported therein to the kiln atmosphere, for maintaining a plurality of such cranks in the proper relative position when superposed, for supporting, centering and maintaining the ware piece onthe crank, and for reducing the weight and cost of manu facture of the crank.

Heretofore it has been the practice with ware of this type to place each ware piece in a crank which totally encloses the ware. Such cranks are generally circular and shaped internally to hold a single ware piece with a minimum amount of waste space, but have the disadvantages of being bulky and quite heavy, weighing at least twice as much as the ware piece enclosed. In ordinary practice these cranks are stacked in bungs either in intermittent kilns or on trucks in continuous tunnel kilns and the cranks must necessarily be heated to the same temperature as the ware being fired, with a consequent wasteful expenditure of fuel- By the use of my invention, such cranks are dispensed with, and the ware is supported in such a manner as to separate the ware pieces and effectively expose them to the temperature of the kiln.

The various features of novelty which characterize my invention are pointed out with particularity in the claims annexed to and forming a part of this specification. For a better understanding of the invention, 110wever, and the advantages possessed by it reference should be had to the accompanying drawing and descriptive matter in which I have illustrated and described preferred embodiments of the invention.

Of the drawing:

Fig. 1 is a side elevation of a bung of cranks embodying one form of my invention;

Figs. 2 and 3 are perspective and vertical sectional views respectively of one of the cranks of Fig. 1; r

Fig. 4 is a vertical section of a portion of a pairof superposed cranks embodying a modified form of my invention;

Fig. 5 is an end view of the crank feet shown in Fig. 4;;

Fig. 6 is a plan view illustrating a modified form of ware centering and supporting means;

Fig. 7 is a section on the line 7-7 of Fig. 6; and

Fig.8 is a section on the line 8-8 of Fig. 6.

In Figs. 1 to 3 of the drawing I have illustrated one embodiment of my invention in which the ware support consists of a crank A, preferablyformed of ceramic or metallic 'material, having provisions for supporting a ware piece which as shown is a plate B. A plurality of such cranks are superposed in practice in the manner illustrated in Fig. 1.

Eachcrank comprises a base member C of general circular form and having integrally formed legs C projecting radially from angularly spaced points. In Figs. 1 to 3 three such legs project horizontally from the base member. Each leg is provided with a foot D at its outer end and each foot D is in the general form of a rectangular block extending vertically a distance which is, in

general, proportional to the depth of the plate to be supported on the base.

Each foot is formed with means for holding it in a definite position relative to the corresponding feet of the adjacent cranks in the bung. Such means preferably consist of a projection D formed on the upper end of each foot and a similarly shaped indenta tion D on the lower end, the projecting portion of the foot on the next lower crank being adapted to fit into the indentation on the superposed crank; Such projections and corresponding indentations may be of various shapes, but preferably as shown the projection D forms an integral part of the top surface of the foot and is triangular in form. The corresponding indentation D formed in the lower end of the foot is similarly shaped. While the projection D may extend partly or entirely across the upper end present invention are preferably formed to directly expose substantially all of the surface of the ware to the kiln atmosphere. With this purpose in View each of the cranks is. of the skeletonized form heretofore described and is further provided with a circular open ing C at the center of the base member. This construction permits a uniform heating of practically all portions of the ware piece.

When the cranks are being loaded and arranged in bungs, it is particularly important that the ware pieces be properly positioned in the cranks and prevented from coming into contact with the inner sides of the crank feet or sliding against the ware in adjacent bungs. One form of means for this purpose is shown in Figs. 2 and 3, and comprises a raised ring or ridge C relatively small in width, formed on the upper surface of the portion of the crank base member surrounding and adjacent to the opening C The ridge C is so proportioned in height and width that the foot B of the ware piece just fits over it and rests on the surface of the base member. This permits a relatively exact centering of the warepiece on the crank and aids materially in preventing sliding of the piece. The raised portion C may in some cases be of some form other than the circular form shown. For example, a polygonal form is desirable to reduce the points of contact with the foot of the ware piece. In addition to or in lieu of the shoulder C the surface of the crank base in contact with the foot of the ware piece maybe roughened or corrugated in any suitable manner to prevent the ware piece from sliding. In Figs. 2 and 3, the roughened portion C surrounds the ridge C One of the most advantageous characteristics of my invention is the formation of each crank with the major portionor all of the bottom surface of the base member flat and preferably on the same level asthe lower end of the crank feet. In the process of manufacturing such cranks, the cranks are allowed to dry while green and unless a suitable form is provided on which the base portion of the crank may be supported while drying, the crank will tend to warp and render the crank defective. By the present invention the use of such forms is avoided and the crank may be handled and dried with its base member and feet in contact with any flat support.

-The crank construction shown in Figs. 4

.ency of the ware piece to stick and 5 is for supporting dishes, soup plates and other relatively deep ware pieces and has the general characteristic and features Cl1S- closed heretofore. In the modified construction the legs integrally connecting the feet to the base member are initially inclined or cut away at I) to permit'the rim B of the ware piece supported on the next lower crank in the bung to extend therein. This construction permits the firing of deep ware in the crank without proportionally increasing the height of the crank. In view of th cut away portion of the legs, the projections D and indentations D extend only partly across the upper and lower surfaces, respectively, of the feet.

In Figs. 6 to 8 I have illustrated my improved crank with a modified form of means for centering, supporting and maintaining the ware piece in the desired position in the crank. In this construction the crank base member C is provided with a plurality of vertically projecting ridge members E extending radially at angularly spaced points about the central opening C Each of the members E projects a short distance vertically and is preferably triangular in cross-section. The tops of the members E are formed with transverse grooves or serrations E. lVit-h this arrangement the ware piece may be properly centered in the crank with only a relatively small surface contact with the supporting membersE and maintained in that position by the serrations E. The serrations further reduce the amount of contact and the tendto the supporting members.

The ridge members E can be formed integral with thecrank base member, if desirable. The integral construction is objectionable, however, because in use some of the glaze on the plate may cause the plate to be ceincnt ed to the ridge members and in removing the plate, there is a liability of portions of the ridge member being broken away. As shown more clearly in Figs. 7 and 8, this objectionable feature may be obviated by forming rectangular depressions C in the base member in which independently formed ridge members E are set. The ridge members may be loosely set or secured therein in any suitable manner. With this arrangement, the ridge members can be renewed if damaged in the manner described.

With the skeletonized crank construction described, the necessary kiln temperature for burning the ware is materially reduced with a consequent substantial saving in the amount of fuel used. The relatively light weight of these cranks also reduces the costs of loading and unloading by permitting the substitution of female labor for the male labor heretofore in general use. 7

While in accordance with the provisions of the statutes, I have illustrated and described the best form of embodiment of my invention 1. A light weight Ware support for ceramic firing comprising a base member on which a single Ware piece is adapted to be directly supported in a horizontal position, and means for centering and preventing movement of said ware piece on said base member comprising a projecting member on the upper side of said base member and extending within the foot of said ware piece.

2. A light weight ware support for ceramic firing comprising a base member on which a ware piece is adapted to be directly supported in a horizontal position, an opening in ,the central portion of said base member for ex posing the underside of said ware piece to the heating medium, and means for centering and preventing movement of said ware piece on 7 said base member comprising a projecting member on the upper side of said base member and surrounding said opening.

3. A light weight ware support for ceramic firing comprising a base member on which a single ware piece is adapted to be directly supported in a horizontal position, the portion of said base member in contact with the foot of said ware piece being roughened to prevent movement of the ware piece thereon. 4. A light weight ware support for ceramic firing comprising a base member on which a single ware piece is adapted to be directly supported in a horizontal position, an opening at the center of said base member forexposing the underside of said ware piece to the heating medium, and means for preventing the movement of said ware piece on said base member comprising a roughened surface on the upper surface of said base member and surrounding said opening. 7

5. A light weight ware support for ceramic firing comprising a base member having a central opening, a plurality of vertical feet. connected to-said base member and adapted to contact with corresponding feet of a similar ware support positioned thereon, and means for centering and supporting a single Ware piece on said base member comprising a plurality of serrated projecting members positioned at anguarly spaced points on said base member about said opening.

6. A light weight ware support for ceramic firing comprising a horizontal base member and means for centering, supporting and preventing movement of a ware piece on said base member including plurality of proj'ect- Y ing members positioned on said base member at spaced points, said projecting members bemg triangular in cross-section and provided with a serrated top surface adapted to contact with said Ware piece.

'7. Alight weight ware support for ceramic on which a ware piece is adapted to be supported, and means for supporting, centering and'preventlng movement of a ware piece on firing comprising a horizontal base member 7 i said, base member comprising a plurality of 1 recesses at angularly spaced points on the upper surface of said base member, and a pluralitycf projecting ridge members removably mounted in said recesses and adapted to support a ware piece mounted thereoin 8. A light weight ware support-comprising a central base member having a substantial opening atthe center thereof and adapted to support a single ware piece with its underside exposed through said opening, a plurality of legs extending radially from said base member and terminating in integral vertically arranged feet, an uprisingportion on said base member lmmediately surroundlng said opening, and a roughened portion on said base member immediately surrounding said uprising portion and arranged to receivethe foot of said'ware piece in contact therewith;

9. Alight weight ware support for deep dish ceramic ware comprising a flat central base member having a central openingthe'rein, a plurality of angularly spaced inclined legs, projecting therefrom and formed with" depending feet extending downwardly to the same level as the lower surface ofsaid base member, and a roughened portion on the upper surface of said base'member' sur rounding said opening and adapted to contact with the foot ofv a ware piece centered thereon to prevent sliding movements thereof.

Signed at Cleveland, in the county of Guyahoga and State of'Ohio, this 29th day of May, A I

A. D. 1929. V HARRY'EDGAR FEAR.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3137910 *Jan 22, 1962Jun 23, 1964Shenango China IncGloss setter
US3681817 *Mar 13, 1970Aug 8, 1972Acme Marls LtdSupporting structures for use in firing pottery
US4536153 *Feb 23, 1983Aug 20, 1985Anthony Frank HRefractory shelf for home hobbyist kiln and method of making kiln
US4715812 *Apr 21, 1986Dec 29, 1987Elektroschmelzwerk Kempten GmbhKiln furniture
US7874434 *Oct 29, 2004Jan 25, 2011Sharp Kabushiki KaishaSubstrate carrying tray
Classifications
U.S. Classification432/259
International ClassificationF27D5/00
Cooperative ClassificationF27D5/0018
European ClassificationF27D5/00B2