Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS1877937 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 20, 1932
Filing dateMay 2, 1927
Priority dateMay 2, 1927
Publication numberUS 1877937 A, US 1877937A, US-A-1877937, US1877937 A, US1877937A
InventorsMoore Arlington
Original AssigneeMaxmoor Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Auxiliary fuel supply means for internal combustion engines of low intake depression
US 1877937 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Se t. 20, 1932.

I A: O Y AUXILIARY FUEL SUPPLY MEANS FOR INTERNAL COMBUSTION ENGINES LOW INTAKE DEPRESSION Filed May 2, 1927 3 Sheets-Sheet l INVENTOR ATTORNEYS AUXILIARY FUEL SUPPLY MEANS FOR INTERNAL COMBUSTION ENGINES OF LOW INTAKE DEPRESSION Filed May 2, 1927 5 Sheets-Sheet 2 Sep%.- 2&1 1932. A, MOORE I. I 1,877,937

"lam/(11 ATTQRNEYS A. MOORE AUXILIARY FUEL SUPPLY MEANS FOR INTERNAL COMBUSTION Sept. 20, 1932.

ENGINES OF LOW INTAKE DEPRESSION FiledMay 2, 1927 3 Sheets-Sheet 5 INVENTOR f0 00/ 6 ATTORNEYfi Patented Sept. 20, 1932 ree I STATES ARLINGTON MOORE, OF NEW YORK, N.

PATENT orricn 'Y., ASSIGNOR, BY MESNE ASSIGNMENTS, 'IO u R CORPORATION, OF NEW YORK, N. Ya, A CORPORATION OF DELAWARE AUXILIARY FUEL SUPPLY MEANS FOR INTERNAL COMBUSTION ENGINES OI LOW 1 INTAKE DEPRESSION Application filed May 2, 1927. Serial No. 188,326.

passages and also having provision for introduction of supplemental gases to the intake above the throttle.

to ing turns are In engines so equipped the intake depression is much less than With ordinary engine practice. Large intake manifolds with easy sweepdesirable because of increased Weight of charge introduced into the engine cylinders, reduction of skin friction and the like. These desirable efiects are especially notable in full power operation'of engines, such as stationary engines, boat and airplane engines and the like, which are run for long periods under full power. v

The present tendency, however, is toward constricted intake manifolds with sharp bends used to keep heavy parts of the fuel in suspension and 0d the manifold walls by high velocity travel and bufieting of the charge.

B supplying supplemental gases above w the throttle into direct admixture with the charge and supplying therewith suficient heat to gasify all parts of the liquid hydrocarbon fuel, this need for constriction is eliminated, and it becomes possible, so far as considerations of fuel suspension are concerned, to make use of large intake manifolds, which are preferable-for reasons indicated above.

l V'nen the entire supply of fuel to the engine cylinders is obtained by the fuel lifting effect of the ingoing air stream passing a fuel jet, comparatively strict limits are imposed upon reduction of pressure in the intake passage, since fuel lifting capacity decreases rapidly with decrease of air velocity passing the jet.

Increasing the extent of throttle opening for the purpose of obtaining acceleration reduces intake depression, and reduces fuel lifting capacity at the same time that increased fuel supply is required, and unless provision is made for extra fuel at such times, an engine of low normal intake depression and depending for fuel supply upon air velocity past a fuel jet is likely to backfire through the carburetor, to have a slow pick-up, and in extreme cases to stop entirely, and this is especially true if the carburetor is set for a lean adjustment with the purpose of securing economical operation. With such lean carburetor adjustment or jet setting, which is well adapted, for example for general operation of an automobile engine, the mixture will also be unduly lean for best power production at high engine loads, and particularly, in case of high power operation at low speed, fuel lifting capacity is cut down My invention provides for supply of extra fuel to the intake conduit independently of air stream velocity and intake depression, as for example, by delivery of fuel thereto under a gravity head, at times when the throttie is being opened, and for a short interval thereafter, and also when'the throttle is open wide for full power operation. The supply of extra fuel in this way permits an economical, lean carburetor adjustment to be retained, thus securing substantially maximum economy for general operation, and enabling full advantage to be taken of the lowered intake depression obtainable with large, freelyiiowing manifold passages and delivery thereto of supplemental gases above the throttle. lVhile making provision for extra fuel supply under the conditions referred to, I so arrange the control means that no extra fuel is supplied during deceleration upon reducing the extent of throttle opening.

By providing extra fuel upon merely opening the throttle, I am enabled to secure quick and certain starting of the engine without resort to use of a choke, which is a principal cause of crank case dilution by introduction in large quantities of heavy ends of fuel into the engine cylinders in order to get in enough of the lighter and more volatile ends to obtain the fuel vapor necessary to start the engine,

With the foregoing and related objects in view, my invention will be best understood from the following description of an illustrative embodiment thereof.

In the accompanying drawings:

Fig. 1 is a perspective view of an internal lid combustion engine for carrying volatile liquid fuel and embodying my invention.

Fig. 2 is' a side view partly in section of the intake manifold riser and associated parts, the section being taken in part on the broken line 22, Fig. 8.

Fig. 3 is a section on the line 33, Fig. 2.

Fig. 4 is a section similar to a corresponding part of Fig. 2, and showing the rotor ports for exhaust gas and preheated air in position corresponding to a partial opening of the throttle.

Fig. 5 is a view similar to Fig. 4 and showing the rotor ports in position corresponding to full or practically full throttle opening.

1 Fig. 6 is a section through the cold air inlet orts of the rotor, and showing same in wi e open position corresponding to full or practically full opening of the throttle. Fig. 7 is a side elevation of the intake riser and associated parts.

gig. 8 is a section on the line 8-8, Fig. 7, an t Fig. 9 is a section on the broken line 99, Fi 8.

e low; intake depression in the con struction shown is due to two causes. The first of these is the large passages in carburetor 10, intake riser 12, and intake manifold 1.4,each of which is preferably about one and one-quarter (1 times the diameter of present day standard practice; that is to say, for example, in an engine ordinarily using a one-inch carburetor, I use a one and one-quarter inch carburetor and enlarge the inlet passages accordingly. The other factor in producing low intake depression is the supply of supplementary, largely inert, gases to the intake manifold riser 12, above the throttle 16, through the conduit 18.

The means for supplying supplementary gases through conduit 18 is described in other copending applications which I have filed, as, for example, application Serial No. 181,- 711, filed April 7, 1927, and will be referred to herein only briefly.

At part throttle, low-load conditions exhaust gas from the exhaust manifold 20, diverted by the Pitot or impact tube member 22, passes through the chamber 24 in the heater 26 to the stationary port 28 in the meter sleeve 30. Air admitted at 32 is heated in passages 34, 34 around heater 26 and delivered to stationary port 36. The exhaust gas entering port 38 in rotor 40, and the preheated air entering rotor 40 through port 42 are admixed in predetermined proportions and pass to conduit 18 through the metering ports comprising rotor port 46 and stationary port 48. 4

Rotor 40 is actuated adj unctively to throttling, being operated by cam leverv 50, which is linked by link 52 to the crank 54 of throttle 16. A cam slot 56 is formed in cam 50, its

amas? out the passage 62 and through the Venturi,

tube 64 around the cold air nozzle 66. In the course of its movement from rotor 40 to Venturi tube 64, the exhaust gas is cooled by radiation fins 68.

Cold air is driven in through funnel exposed to a blast, as of the motor fan 72,

and asses through the stationary port 74,-

ort 6 of the rotor 40 and stationary port 8 (Fig. 6) and through passage 80, indicated in dotted lines in Fig. 2, to the nozzle 66.

The supplementary gases controlled by rotor 40 and supplied through conduit 18 are delivered to the intake riser through theelbow member 82 interposed between the riser 12 and the carburetor 10, the throttle 16 being contained in an upward extension of the carburetor casing. Delivery of the supplementary gases to the intake is through an annular nozzle 84 surrounding the thin tube 86, which forms substantially a continuation of the charge passage through the carburetor. The supplemental gases, being delivered substantially tangentially to the annular passage 88 surrounding tube 86, swirl 'therearound and issue through annular nozzle 84 in the direction of flow in the intake riser and in a state of cyclonic agitational movement well adapted to secure thorough admixture with the charge stream coming through the carburetor. The agitational mixing is increased by a slight enlargement of the intake passage above annular nozzle 84, followed by a corresponding contraction thereof, as shown in Fig. 2. Delivery of supplemental gases in this or other ways above the throttle results in materially reducing the intake depression, that is, the pressure in the intake is raised and approaches nearer to the pressure of the surrounding atmosphere. This in turn acts to reduce the speed of the air stream past the carburetor fuel jet.

The means for supplying extra fuel and thereby compensating for reduced fuel lift- In the construction shown, a bowl containing a float chamber 92 is mounted onthe lntake riser 12 and connected by a pipe 94 to a fuel supply means from which fuel is sup- 3 shut off, but

plied to the carburetor, as a vacuum tank, for example. The fuel, after passing through a strainer 96, enters the chamber 92 through inlet port 98 controlled by float valve 100 actuated through a lever 102 b a float 104. Float 104 is preferably made airly long, so as to be received in the space available and to secure effective control of supply valve 100.

As previously stated, the extra fuel is preferably delivered under a gravity head. As shown, its delivery is controlled by a needle valve 106, which controls the supply of fuel to a passage 108 leading from the bottom of chamber 92 and encircling the Venturi tube 110, which tube 110 surrounds the annular nozzle 84 for delivery of supplemental gases to the intake passage, Fine passages 112, bored through tube 110, serve to deliver the fuel in subdivided state into the path of the supplementary gases coming through the annular nozzle 84, which complete the breaking up of the fuel. 1

A fine air duct 114 in the fuel measuring screw 116 supplies a limited quantity of air for aerating and'breaking up the auxillary fuel supply, and the space 118 under the head of screw 116 can be filled with filtering material such as absorbent cotton, which will permit air to pass and prevent dirt from getting through. The opening 114 is so small as not to materially lean out the mixture at idling. By adjusting screw 116 and securing it 1n adjusted position by set screw 120, the supply of auxiliary fuel can be controlled as des red. The fuel passage 108 has one or more air inlets with spring check valve controhand is so arranged that, while air is excluded when the throttle is completely or nearly closed and the intake depression is at or near its maximum, the air can get through an enter with and break up the fuel at other times and especially at full load operation of the engine. One such air inlet means is shown at 122, Fig. 2. With this arrangei ment, air opening 124 is controlled by a ball valve 126, which is opposed by spring 128. lVhen intake depression is at or near its maximum, the spring 128 is compressed, the

' ball check is drawn to its seat and the air when intake depression is less or practically absent, as at wide open throttle, the expansion of spring 128 pushes the ball 126 away from its seat, and air is admitted to assist in breaking up the auxiliary 5 fuel. Thus, while the air supplied in this way does not interfere with engine idling or low power operation, the air can be admitted in plentiful quantities for securing thorough fuel aeration and subdivision in case auxiliary fuel is supplied when the intake depression is sutliciently lowto permit valve 126 to be opened by spring 128.

The valve 106 supply of auxiliary for controlling the gravity d can be resorted to plied in addition to that fuel is normally held closed by spring 130. It is actuated for opening against said" spring by a cam 132 coacting with a roller 134 running in inclined slots 135 in the two-part lever member v136, saidlever being supported by a stop 138 and being connected by link 140 to a second lever 142, which operates valve pin 106.

The inclination of slots 135 is such that when cam 132 is turned in the direction of the arrow in Fig. 9, which movement corresponds to opening movement of the throttle 16, the roller 134 is frictionally pushed toward the lower end of slots 135 and the lever 136 is raised and valve 106 opened by engagement with roller 134 of either the narrow pro ec tion 144 of cam 132, which is the first to come into engagement with roller 134, or of the wider cam projection 146, which engages roller 134 at, and near full throttle opening.

Upon any return movement of earn 132, however slight, the roller 134 rides to the high end of the slots 135 and the fuel delivery valve 106 closes, whatever the position of the cam 132 and projections 144 and 146 thereof.

The parts just referred to are preferably enclosed in a housing 148 carried on the intake riser 12. The ,crank 149 of cam 132 extends through the wall of housing 148 into abonnet 150 open at its lower part and provided with a cover 152, so that the crank 149 will beprotected and cannot be tampered with.

Link 154 serves to connect crank 149 of cam 132 to an arm of the throttle crank 54, so that the cam 132, and thereby the fuel valve 106, is automatically operated adjunctively to throttling, and without requiring separate attention or manual manipulation.

if desired, a cam lever and slot connection for this connection, as in the case of the rotor 40, for metering of supplementary gases, but a simple crank is ordinarily all that is needed.

It will be observed that no choke is illustrated, notwithstanding the unusually large sized intake passages. At or just before starting, the throttle is opened up once or twice sutficiently to produce opening, of the auxiliary fuel valve 106 by means of the first cam projection 144. This supplies fuel at 112 for starting and the engine can be started in the usual way, except, of course, that there is no choke. The cam projection 144 is so there is none of the flooding that takes place in starting with the usual choke. Each time the throttle is opened up for speeding up the engine, the valve 106 is opened and fuel suptaken from the carburetor fuel jet, either by the first cam projection 144, or, in the case ofopening the throttle wide, by first this narrow cam projection 144 and then the second relatively nomical fuel rate on the fuel supply from the carburetor fuel jet.

When the throttle is opened up and kept open for full power running, the valve 106 is held open so long as the throttle opening is maintained and auxiliary fuel is fed by valve 106,1he quantity fed being controlled by the initial adjustmentof the fuel metering and air bleeding needle 116.

i The auxiliary fuel, when fed, is always aerated and broken up by air admixture through the fine passage 114 in needle 116, and when the pressure in the intake manifold rises suficiently to reduce the pressure differential inside and outside the riser 12 to permit spring 128 to expand and move ball check 126' from its seat, the auxiliary fuel is further aerated and broken up by airsupplied through the opening or openings 124.

It will-be seen that my invention eliminates practically all of the objectionable ,features encountered in internal combustion engines which are subject to frequentlyre- 0 curringvariations in the requirements for power and speed, such as automobile engines. With the lowering of intake depression, ll get a notable decrease in pumping losses and suction of oil past the pistons and an equally notable increase in cylinder pressures and power. I can operate economically on lean mixtures by using a main or principal fuel jet adapted to furnish such mixtures and take care of any temporary deficiency of such fuel supply by supplying auxiliary fuel in proper quantities when and only when it is needed. The hot supplementary gases supplied above the throttle during operation at low loads 'sifies the fuel and raises the temperature to or over the point of initial oxidation, so that by the time it enters the cylinders, it is in condition best adapted for complete combustion and its thoroughly gasified state permits the use of wide, full intake passages without the loading up of fuel in the cylinder walls, which has hitherto prevented the use of such intake passages, powerful acceleratill) tion is obtained by opening the throttle, the extra "fuel delivered by gravity when the throttle is suddenly opened serving to generate a piston speed suiiicient to reestablish the proper function of the carburetor, and when considerations of getting full power are paramount, as in steep hill climbing, for example, the necessary fuel for a high power mixture is forthcoming automatically, 'without any special attention or manual manipulation.

The choke is taken-01f the engine, and with it goes a principal source of dilution of lubricant on the cylinder walls and in. the

crank case, while starting is much more easy and certain than with the vicious mode of starting the engine with the old choke.

This application is in part a continuation of my application Serial No.181,711, filed April 7, 1927. Subject matter of the invention disclosed herein and not claimed is disclosed and claimed in my copending-applications Serial N 0. 164,349, filed January 28,

' 1927 and Serial N 0.17 6,410, filed March 18,

I claim: p 1. The combination with the ,carburetor and intake conduit of an internal combustion engine for consuming volatile liquid fu'ekof auxiliary constant level fuel supply means communicating with said intake conduit, and a valve .controlling the fuel "pas-- sage from said constant level means to the intake and operated adjunctively to engine throttling, said fuel passage and said valve being disposed below the level of the fuel in said constant level fuel supplymeans for effecting gravity delivery of fuel to the intake conduit.

2. The combination with an internal combustion engine comprising a throttle and intake conduit, of constant level fuel supply means having a fuel passage communicating with the intake conduit above the throttle, and means operated adjunctively to throttling for releasing fuel into the intake conduit from said supply means through said passage when the intake depression is temporarily lowered.

3. The combination in an internal combustion engine'of an intake conduit, a carburetor, a throttle, tivelyto throttlin for supplying supplemental gases inclu ing exhaust gas and air to the intake over the throttle, and means operated adjunctively to throttling for supplying auxiliary fuel to said gases in the engine conduit.

4. The combination in an internal combastion engine of an intake conduit, a carburetor, a throttle, valvular means operated adjunctively to throttling for supplying inert gases to the intake over the throttle, and valvular means operated adjunctively to throttling for supplying auxiliary fuel to the engine conduit upon opening movement only ofthe throttle.

5; In an internal combustion engine, a

carburetor, an intake conduit, a throttle, a

buretor, an intake conduit, a throttle, an an nula assage opening into the conduitradja means operated adjunc- ,bustion engine of an buretor operated by engine suction throughout the range of engine operation, a throttle,

.means for supplying supplementary gases valved air bleed means controlled to the intake conduit above the throttle, and means controlled at times when fuel lifting through the carburetor is subnormal for delivering a supply of auxiliary fuel to the intake conduit above the carburetor by pressure supplementary to that due to engine induction.

8. ln an internal combustion engine, an intake conduit, a carburetor supplying fuel and air throughout the range of operation of the engine, a throttle, means for supplying to the intake above the throttle auxiliary fuel underpressure supplementary to that due to intake depression and automatically replenished from the same fuel source as the fuel supplied to the carburetor, and means operated adjunctively to throttling for opening said fuel supplying means, so leng as a predetermined opening of the throttle is exceeded.

9. In an internal combustion engine, an intake conduit, acarburetor, a throttle, means for supplying aum liary fuel to the intake conduit above the throttle, means for opening said fuel supplying means at predetermined stages of throttle movement and by variations in intake depression for aerating and breaking up said auxiliary fuel adapted to open at the stage of throttle movement when the intake depression falls below a predetermined amount,

ill. In an internal combustion engine having a carburetor, an intake conduit and a throttle, a constant level fuel container provided with a valved bottom outlet to the in take, and cam controlled means interlinked with the throttle for opening up said valve first a little and then additionally as the throttle is opened throughout its range of opening.

ll. In an internal combustion engine having an intake conduit, a carburetor, and a throttle, means for supplying gases to the intake conduit supplementary to the stream through the carburetor, means for supplying auxiliary fuel to the intake conduit in addition to that supplied through the carburetor, and common control means for the throttle, the supplemental gas delivery means, and the auxiliary fuel means. I

12; Means for feeding fuel to the intake conduit of an internalcombustion engine in addition to that suppliedthrough the carburetor, comprising a constant level container with a valved bottom. gravity outlet to the v intake conduit, and cam means interconnected with the throttle to open the valve and release the fuel upon opening movement of the throttle and inoperative for fuel release upon closing throttle movement.

13..' In an internal combustion engine,

means for feeding fuel to the intake conduitabove the throttle at predetermined stages of throttle movement, means for continuously bleeding a modicum of air into the fuel stream for subdivision thereof, and means for supply= ing additional air for aeration and breaking up of the fuel when the intake depression is less than a predetermined amount.

14:. An internal combustion an intake manifold, a carburetor, and throttle associated with said intake manifold, said carburetor comprising means for lifting fuel by air velocity past a fuel jet, means for delivering heated gases comprising exhaust gas of the engine to the intake above the throttle whereby the fuel is gasified, and means for efiecting limited delivery of fuel by gravity into the intake passage above the throttle upon opening movement of the throttle.

15. In a four stroke cycle internal combustion engine for consuming volatile liquid fuel and comprising an abnormally large intake manifold, an abnormally large carburetor, a throttle, and means for supplying supplemental ases to the intake over the throttle whereiy the intake de ression is characteristically low, of means or supplying auxiliary fuelto the intake, for releasing said fuel at intervals for supplying limited quantities of fuel in addition to the fuel supply through the carburetor upon opening up of the throttle for acceleration and fon supplying said auxiliary fuel substantially continuously at and near wide open throttle position.

16. In an internal combustion engine, an intake conduit of abnormally large bore, abnormally large carburetor,

an elbow member in said conduit in which the gases are set into rotational movement, an annular delivery nozzle from said elbow engine having a throttle, a conduit for conduction of supplemental gases,-

and means ltd member to the intake conduit directed in the direction of flow therein, a riser portion of said intake conduit which is enlarged and then contracted beyond the delivery point of said nozzle to produce agitation and admixture of charge materials therein, means for diverting stream and admixing the exhaust gas with hot air during partial throttle openings and with cold air during wider throttle openings and delivering same to the intake passage through said supplemental gas conduit, the intake depression of the engine being chara portion of the exhaust gas acteristically abnormally low, a constant level fuel container associated with the intake conduit and taking fuel from the same supply means interconnected with the throttle for opening the auxiliary fuel valve and releasing auxiliary fuel to the intake whereby the said valve is opened somewhat upon early opening movement of the throttle and is further opened upon additional throttle opening movement and kept open until at least some reverse throttle movement takes place, whereupon the auxiliary fuel valve is automatically closed.

17. The combination with an internal combustion engine, of a constant level fuel supply means, means for conveying supplemental fuel therefrom to the intake conduit, and for subjecting said fuel to a potentially available pressure supplementary to that due to vthe engine induction, and means operated manually at will for releasing said supplemental fuel and for rendering said pressure active thereon.

18. The combination with the intake conduit, throttle, and main fuel delivering means of an internal combustion engine, of means for conveying supplemental gases including exhaust gas and air to said intake conduit above the throttle, means for controlling the delivery of said supplemental gases to said intake conduit, and means separate from the main fuel delivering means for delivering a charge of fuel to said supplemental gases at periods of main fuel impoverishment.

19, The combination with the intake conduit throttle, and main fuel delivering means of an internal combustion engine, of means for conveying supplemental gases including exhaust gas and air to said intake conduit above the throttle, means. operated adjunctlvely with the operation of. the throttle for controlling the admission of said supplemental gases to said intakeconduit, and separate means for delivering a charge of fuel to said supplemental gases; said last named means being rendered efi'ective to deliver fuel to said supplemental gases at periods of main fuel impoverishment.

20. The combination with the intake conduit, throttle and main fuel delivering means of an internal combustion engine, of a tubular portion disposed within said intake conduit above the throttle and forming with said intake conduit an annular passage open at the top thereof, means for supplying supplement ary gases including exhaust gas and.

air to said intake conduit through said annular passage, and means associated with said annular passage for delivering auxiliary fuel to said supplementary gases-as the same enter' the intake conduit.

21. In charge supplementing apparatus for internal combustion engines, means for delivering a mixture of exhaust gas and air to the engine intake beyond the throttle, and means for supplying auxiliary fuel to the intake upon acceleration in substantially the region of delivery of the gaseous mixture and subject to the heating action thereof.

22. In charge supplementing apparatus for internal combustion engines, means for supply of exhaust gas and air to the engine intake, control means therefor, means for supplying to the intake passage fuel in addition to that supplied through the carburetor,

control means therefor, and interconnections between said two control means and the throttle for operating same adj unctively with throttling.

23. In charge supplementing apparatus for internal combustion engines, means for delivering a mixture of exhaustgas and air into direct admixture with the fuel and air stream from the carburetor between the throttle and the engine cylinders whereby the absolute intake pressure is raised, and means for compensating for resulting reduction of draft on the fuel by delivery to the resulting mixture of auxiliary fuel substantially independently of intake suction and stream velocity, r

24. The combination with an internal combustion engine comprising an intake condult, and a throttle therein, of a constant level fuel container communicating with the intake beyond the throttle at a point below the level of the fuel in said container, and means Including a valve actuated by the throttle for controlling the passage of fuel from sa d container, said means supplying an accelerating charge of'fuel upon initial opening of the throttle, and fuel continuously at a wider open throttle position I 0 25. The combination with an internal cornbustion engine comprising an intake conduit, and a throttle therein, of a constant level fuel container communicatingat a point below the level of the fuel in said container with the intake above the throttle, a valve actuated by the throttle for controlling the passe e of fuel from said container, and an air leed communicating with the fuel passage between the valve and the point of discharge into the intake.

26. The combination with an internal combustion engine comprising an intake conduit and a throttle therein, of a constant level fuel container having a gravity flow line of communication with the intake at the engine side of the throttle, and valvular means located ill ill

in said line of communication below the fuel in said container level, and actuated momenfor supplying enriching fuel upon engine acceleration.

27. The combination with an internal combustion engine comprising an intake conduit and throttle therein, of a constant level fuel container having a gravity flow line of communication with the intake conduit, a valve located in said line of communication below the fuel level in said container, throttle actuated cam means having portions for momentarily opening said valve upon initial opening of the throttle and again at wider open throttle positions, and means for preventing movement of the valve from closed position as the throttle closes.

28. The combination with an internal combustion engine comprising an intake conduit 7 and a throttle therein, of a constant level fuel container having a gravity flow line of communication with the intake conduit at the engine side of the throttle, ling the flow of fuel from said container, a cam for actuating said valve adjunctively to throttling, said cam including means for m0 valve upon initial openin movement of the throttle and again to retain the valve open at greater throttle,

openings, means for rendering said cam moperative to open the valve as the throttle closes, and means for aerating the fuel released by said valve.

In testimony whereof, I have signed my name hereto.

ARLINGTON MOORE.

a valve for control-

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4327698 *Jan 8, 1980May 4, 1982Nissan Motor Co., Ltd.Exhaust gas recirculating device
USRE34315 *Mar 5, 1991Jul 20, 1993 Remote mixture control tool
Classifications
U.S. Classification123/437, 123/579, 123/568.11, 123/556, 123/544
International ClassificationF02M21/00
Cooperative ClassificationF02M21/00, F02M2700/13
European ClassificationF02M21/00