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Publication numberUS1880093 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 27, 1932
Filing dateApr 6, 1931
Priority dateApr 6, 1931
Publication numberUS 1880093 A, US 1880093A, US-A-1880093, US1880093 A, US1880093A
InventorsHuston Charles H
Original AssigneeHuston Charles H
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Liquid and air circulating refrigerator
US 1880093 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

sept. 27, 1932. HUSTN y 1,880,093

LIQUID AND AIR CIRCULATING REFRIGERATOR LFiled April 6. 1931 CMH/Hum ATTORNEY.

Patented Sept. 1982 hdtfid CHARLES El. HUSTON, GF ALLERTON, IOWA.

mourn Ann .ein eincnmirrue nnrn-rennnfron ltrpinaticn ledhprl G, 1981. Serial No. 587,889.

l he principal object of myinvention is to provide a refrigerator that produces a relatively low temperature to the amount of ice used.

A further obj ect of this invention is toprovide a refrigerator that is so constructed that the air inside the refrigerator is continuously kept in a fresh condition. A

A still further object of my invention is to provide a refrigerator that when once intalled requires little attention from the owner and one that is easily kept in a sanitary condition.

A. lstill further object of this invention is to provide a liquid and air circulating refrigerator that is economical in manufacture and economical and durable in use.

These and other objects will be Vapparent to those skilled in the art.

My invention consists in the construction, arrangement and combination of the various parts` of the device, whereby the objects contemplated are attained as hereinafter more fully set forth, pointed out in my claims and illustrated in the accompanying drawing, in

which: c

Fig. 1 is a side sectional view of my complete invention in use.

F ig. 2 is a top plan sectional view of the 30 device and is taken on line 2-2 of Fig. 1, to more fully illustrate its interior construction.

F ig. 8 is an enlarged view of the water outlet pipes.

The chief objections to large refrigerators now on the market are that they are lacking in eiciency relative to the amount of ice` used and harbor excessive impurities in the atmosphere inside the refrigerator. l have overcome these objections by provi/ding a refrigerator that not only utilizes thecold liquid from the melted ice to additionally cool the inside of the refrigerator, but promotes continuous circulation of the air inside the refrigerator.

l have designated the housing of my invention by the numeral 10. This housing, which forms the ice box of the invention, is preferably of rectangular elongated construction with its left end portion extending to a height above the height of thebalance of the housing, as shown in Fig.V l. The housing l0 may be made of any suitable material and is completely lined with nonconductive material 11 such as cork or the like. Thenumeral 12 designates a lid enclosing anopeningin the top of the ice box. This lid 12 is positioned above the greatest depth of the refrigerator. Inside theV housing 10 and below the lid 12 is a comparatively large vertical tank 18.

T his tankis spaced apart from the lid 12, the

floor of the housing A10, and the left inner side of the spaced apart at its upper end portion from the downwardly extending top portion 14; of

the housing which exists by virtue ofthe fact that the left end portion of the housing is higher in altitude than the balance of the housing.

However, the width of the tank 18 extends completely from the back side .of the housing 10 to the front side of the housingl 10, as shown in Fig. 2. The numeral 1 5 designates a small drain cock having one end communicating with the inside of the housing 10 and its other end communicating with the inside bottom of the tank 18. rlhe numeral `16 designates a lid enclosing an opening in the top of the tank 18. This tank 18 has its inside top insulated with suitable material such as cork and also its upper side portion fur- *trayV on the top of the freezing. compartment.

The numeral 2O designates a comparatively shallow horizontal tank suitably supported inside the housinglO. This tank 20eXtends from the tankv18 to a position near the right inner side of the housing 10 and is of such dimensions that a considerable space exists `between 1t and the inside top of the housing 10 and the inside bottom of the housing 10. It

will also` be noted that the greater portion of housing 10. The tank y18 is also` the length of this second tank resides inside the portion of the housing that is comparatively low and that the tank 13 resides in the portion of the housing 10 that is of the greater The numeral 22 designates a hood on the` left end portion of the tank 20, which eik u tends to the left and upwardly where it is soldered or-otherwise secured to the outer side of th'e tank 13. The numeral 23 designates a pipe' having one end communicating with the inside 4of the tank V13 just below the tray 19 and the inside of the hood port-ion As the hood portion .22 has its lower end communicating With the inside top of the tank 20, liquid passing from the tank 13 through the pipe23 will fall into the tank 20, which has 5 its main portion below the pipe 23.

The numeral 24 designates a plurality of doors inthe rear side of the housing 10, which permit access to the stop of the tank 20. This yspace -above the tank 2O is the cooling com- O partment of the refrigerator. The numeral `25 designates'adownwardly extending batlie member of non-conductive material such as cork or the like. This bai-lie member 25 eX- tends downwardly7 directly below the portion 5 14 `and terminates a distance above the'tank 20 and hood 22. The numeral 26 designates a small receptacle Vat the right end of the tank 20. This receptacle 26 has the same height and elevation of the tank 20. The numeral 27 designates a pipe having one end communicating with the inside top of the tank '20 and its other end communicating with the inside of the receptacle 26.

The numeral 28 designates a second pipe having one end terminating inside the tank 20, but ata point much lower in elevation than the pipe 27 and its other end terminat in-g inside the receptacle 26. The numeral 29 designates a manually operated valve interimposed in the pipe 28. lThe numeral 30 designates a continuous trough in the bottoiu of the housing 10 and'which follows adj acent the four inner sides of the invention. The

*bottom of the trough 30, as shown in Fig. 3.V

VThe numeral 33 designates a second drain or Water outlet pipe also-extending into the housing 10 and into the trough 30, but tervminating at the bottom of the trough 30, as

height. As this tank 2O is of much less width Y numeral 31 designates a pipe communicating Y shown in `Fig. 3. The numeral 311 designates a threaded plug or means for enclosing the pipe 33 in order that the same will not be in communication at times with the inside of the trough 30. The complete housing 10 may be held above a supporting surface 36 by .blocks or legs 35.

To operate the device it is merely necessary to remove the lids 12 and 16, fill the tank 13 with broken ice 37 and salt and replace the lids 12 and 16. This ice as it melts, will fill the bottom portion of the tank 13 and provide the cold salt water, which I have designated by the numeral 38. The member19 will'aid in holding most of the broken or cracked ice above the compartment 17. As the lcompartment 17 will be completely surrounded by ice or extremely cold salt water, all'food materials, which require a very low temperature to prevent them from spoiling, shouldl be placed in this freezing compart- Vment through the door 18.

Y As the ice melts and the liquid therefrom raises in the tank 13, which may be tapered y toward its bottom, it will eventually pass or an auxiliary bottom may be supplied to` rest on top of the tank 20.

Glass Windows may also be in the front of `4 the refrigerator, but which are not shown, due to the sectional showings of the drawing. From the tank 20 the cool liquid will pass through the pipe 27 into the rec-eptacle- 2G,

from which it will pass through the pipe 31 to the trough 30. This trough 30 will lill with the cooling fluid luntil it reaches a height to pass out from the refrigerator through the pipe 32. Naturally, by the time the liquid 38 passes out of the pipe 32, which is at the right end of the refrigerator, it will have lost the major portion of its coldness. Tf it is desired, the tank 20 may be maintained only partially filledwith cool water and this is accomplished by opening the valve 29. clean the device, all of the water should be drained from the trough 30 and this is accomplished by removing the plug 34e. c

ris the right upper side and top of the tank 13 are insulated, they will be warmer than the left end side and bottom ofthe tank 13. This will cause the air between the inner right end of the housing 10 and the tank13 to circulate downwardly and tothe right under the bottom of the tank 13, asshown by the arrows To`r in Fig. 1. From below the bottom of the tank 13 the air will circulate upwardly and to the right under the tank 20. As the right end wall and back side of the tank 2G are insulated and warmer than the other sides of the tank, the air inside the refrigeratoi` will tend to circulate upwardly between the rear wall of the refrigerator and the tank 2O and between the right end wall of the refrigerator and the tank 200. Some of this air, after it passes to the compartment above the tank 20, will pass downwardly between the tank 2O and the front wall of the refrigerator, the-reby providing a transverse circulation of the air around the tank 20. j

Most ofthe air, however, thatreaclies the compartment above the tank 2O will pass below the baille member 25 and upwardly between the right side of the tank 13 and the portion 14 of the housing, as shown in Fig. 1. From this position, the circulating air will pass Vabove the tank 13 and then downwardly, as we have lierebcfore seen. The upward movement of the air between the tank 13 and the bathe member 25 and portion 14 is encouraged to do so by the upper right side portion of the tank 13 being properly insulated and of a warmer nature than the other side and bottom of the tank 13.

.f- The battle member 25 also revents a change of circulation or for an excessive amount of cool circulating air in the refrigerator to escape through any of the doors 24 when they are opened, as this member extends to a lower elevation than the lowest elevation of any of the doors 24.

lf it is desired to drain Vthe tank 13, the drain cock 15 should be opened.

From the foregoing, it will readily be yseen that by circulating the air inside the refrigerator and using the cold liquid from the melting ice, a refrigerator is provided that produces an extremely low temperature relative to the amount of ice used, thereby making for ethciency and economy. Also, the circulating of the air inside the refrigerator eliminates impurities and offensive odors inside the saine. Much of these impurities in the air, which contact the water in the trough 30, will be carried of' by the water through the outlet drain pipe 32.

Although I have described my invention as particularly adapted to use with cracked ice and salt, it may be also used to advantage with electric refrigeration insidethe tank 13. A hood 39 may be placed in the compartment 17 to prevent condensed liquidV from falling downwardly onto the items in the compartment. Insulation should be placed under this hood. rlhe numeral Ll0 designates a drain pipe leading from the compartment 17.

Some changes maybe made in the construction and arrangement of my improved liquid and air circulating refrigerator without departing from theffreal spirit and purwhich maybe reasonablyV Aincludedrwithin -lwln afdevice of the clas'sdescribed, ahousing, a vertical tank inside said housing having `some'of its sides spaced from theinner sides ofi-said housing?, a' compartment 'inside said tank, a door=communicating withv the inside .ofsaidcompartment,a second tank-inside said housing `and having some of its-sidesV spaced apart Ifrom the inner sides ofV said housing, aA pipe having one ofits ends communicating with Ythe inside-ofsaid first mentioned tankandii'ts 1 other V end communicatcompartment above said second tank, a door communicating with the-.inside ofv said last mentioned compartment, anoutlet pipe com'- municating with the insidev ofsaid second ving "with the inside ofthe secondv tank, a `85 tank, andlinsulating material embracing a Yportion of each of said tanks for encouraging the circulating of air inside saidhousing.

2. In a device yof the class: described, a housing, `avertical tank inside saidhousing 4having some of its sides spaced: from the innersides of said housing, a compartment Y inside said tank, a Idoor communicating with .the insideof said com artment .a second tank inside saidfhousing and Vhaving some of its sides spacedapart: fromthe inner sides of said housing, a,pipe having one end lcommunicating .with the inside of said first mentioned tank at a point 'between the top and bottom of-saidtank' and its other end .communicating with the inside top of said second tank, a compartment above said second tank, a door communicating with the yinside of v-said lastmentioned compartment,

an outlet pipe communicating with the inside ofsaidsecond tank, and insulating material embracing a -portion vof each of said tanks 'for encouraging the circulating of air inside said housing. 1

3. In a device ofthe class described, a housing, a vertical-.tank inside saidhousing having some of its sides spaced from the -iiinerY sides .of said housing, a compartment inside said tank, a tray inside `said tank and above said `compartment, adoor communieating with the inside of said compartment, a second tank inside said housing and having some of its sides spaced apart from the inner sides of said housing, a pipe having one of its ends communicating with the inside of said iirst mentioned tank and in its other endV communicating with the inside of the second tank, a compartment above said second tank, a door communicating with the inside of said last mentioned coinpartment, an outlet pipe communicating with the inside of said second tank, and inion ilo

sulating material embracing a portion of each of fsaid tanks for encouraging the circulating of air inside said housing. l

4. In a device of the class described, a housing, a vertical tank inside and at one end of said housing; said tank having its right and left sides and top and bottom spaced from the inner sides of said housing, a. horizontal tank inside said housing fand spaced yapart from the inner sides of said housing, aV compartment inside said iist mentioned tank-Y; said second mentioned tank so positioned as to create a compartment between its top andthe top of said housing,

a pipe having one end communicating with said first mentioned tank and its other end communicating With the inside end of said second tank adjacent said lfirst tank, and an outlet pipe communicating with the inside opposite end of said second tank.

5. In a device of the class described, an elongated housing having one ofits end portions higher than its other end portion, a comparatively deep tank inside said housing and positioned Where said housing has the highest elevation; said tank having its top, bottom, `and right and left sides spaced from the inner sides of said housing, insulating material on the top and right kside of said tank, a compartment inside said tank, a comparatively shallow horizontal tank inside said housing and completely spaced from the inner sides of said housing, a pipe having one end `communicating With the inside of said first mentioned tank and the inside of said second mentioned tank, a downwardly extending bailie member inside said housing and terminating a ldistance above said second tank, insulating material on the back side and right side of said second tank, `a smallv receptacle at Ithe right-end of said second tank, a pipe having one end communicating with the inside top .of said second tank and said receptacle, a second pipe having one end communicating With the inside Y of said second ytank and its other end communicating With the inside of said receptacle and at a lower altitude .than said first Y mentioned pipe, a manually operated valve intel-imposed in said last mentioned pipe, and a ldrain pipe having one end communieating with the inside of said receptacle. CHARLES H. HUSTON.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US7389782 *Sep 9, 2002Jun 24, 2008Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd.Dishwasher and method of controlling the same
US20030221709 *Sep 9, 2002Dec 4, 2003Samsung Electronics., LtdDishwasher and method of controlling the same
Classifications
U.S. Classification62/417, 62/461
International ClassificationF25D3/04, F25D3/00
Cooperative ClassificationF25D3/04
European ClassificationF25D3/04