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Publication numberUS1883187 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 18, 1932
Filing dateJul 28, 1930
Priority dateJul 28, 1930
Publication numberUS 1883187 A, US 1883187A, US-A-1883187, US1883187 A, US1883187A
InventorsWeber Herman G
Original AssigneeWeber Herman G
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Marking roll with metal plates and cushion
US 1883187 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Oct. 18, 1932. H. ca. WEBER MARKING ROLL WITH METAL PLATES AND CUSHION Filed July 28, 1930 1/5 fiezwzme 6? %ber Patented Oct. 18,- 1932 PATENT OFFICE 11mm (1. wanna, or rnnannnrnu, rmm snvmu M ABKING ROLL WITH METAL PLATES AND CUSHION Application filed July'88, 1980. Serial N0. 471,202.

This invention relates to a marking device and more particularly to such a device having special utility in a paper-making machine for imparting water marks or other designs to the paper or other fibrous web as it moves through the machine.

Various grades and qualities of paper are required in the industry and, accordingly, it is advisable to mark the papers to indicate the quality thereof and the company by which it is manufactured. This result is generally accomplished'by means of rolls having surfaces with designs thereon which are impressed on the paper, in present practice, usually after it leaves the forming part of the machine and before it reaches the calender rolls.

As will be appreciated, the designs on said surfaces wear out after a time, or in some inof paper made in the machine, in which event it becomes necessary to remove the marking rolls. If the marking faces of the rolls are worn out, the rolls are usually dismantled and to, as required by economical practice.

Marking rolls heretofore generally employed for this purpose comprise either the stereotype form in which stereotype marking plates are rigidly secured to a supportving roll or shaft, or the engraved rubber form. The latter type employs marking faces of hard gum secured to the support ing roll by a layer of soft, endless rubber In addi ion," when the stereotypes wear out or the quality of paper produced the machine is changed, consider-able time and dif' stances, it may be desired to change the grade new or renewed marking faces applied therebands in turnsecured to the shaft, or byficulty is experienced in replacin the rolls in the machine by other rolls, dismantling the rolls if'worn, and in renewin and reconstructing the rolls. Similar problems are presented in the engraved gum surface rolls, 5 especially in regard to the removal and replacement of worn marking surfaces.

I have now constructed a stereotype form of marking roll which is singularly free from the vabove objections in that it has a rather low initial cost, has a readily rem0vable marking surface permitting it to be quickly constructed and dismantled, and a low operating cost.

It is, accordingly, an object of my invention to provide a stereotype markin roll so constructed as to obviate the necessity of wrapping the marking surface thereof.

It is a further important object of my invention to provide a marking roll havin 7 a marking surface which can be uickly and easily mounted on and remove su porting roll or shaft.

t is a further important object of mg invention to provide a marking roll whic is relatively cheap, easy to construct, and renew, and has a high efficiency in use.

Other and further important objects of myinvention will become apparent from the 'from its following description and appended claims.

Referring now to the drawing which discloses a preferred form of my invention:

Figure 1 is a side elevational view of my improved marking roll with parts in section and parts vbroken away.

Figure 2 is a sectional View taken on line IIII of Figure 1.

The marking roll of this invention is indicated generally by the reference numeral r I and comprises a core or supporting rolf 2, which is made hollowto decreasethetotal weight thereof. Journal. extensions tare pressed into each end 4. of said, core '2, and" are maintained securely inv position-therein by pins or keys 5'.

p The entire periphery 6- of said core or support 2 is surrounded by acresilient cushioning sleeve 7 of cork, naturator?synthetic? rubber or the like, cemented or otherwise-'- firmly anchorediea. the. core; Whilethe sleeve 7 is herein shown as comprising a single sleeve of the length of core 2, it may well comprise a lurality of smaller sleeves preferably slight y spaced apart and united to the core to provide a cushioning layer about the periphery of said core.

Said cushioning sleeve 7 is in turn surrounded by a layer 8, made up of a plurality of steel sleeves 90f such diameter as to fit over and snugly hug about said cushioning sleeve 7. The size of said steel sleeves 9 may be varied as desired, but are preferably of a width of from 6 to 12 inches and a wall thickness of about 1 to 2 inches.

The steel sleeves 9 form a support for the marking surface 10 of the roll, which is composed of a plurality of thin sleeves 11 of brass, steel, type metal or some similar metal which can be readily etched or engraved to provide a stereotype marking sleeve. Said sleeves 11 are secured to the steel sleeves 9 by means of small screws 12 having counter-v sunk heads 13.

The outer surface of each marking sleeve 11 carries an etched or engraved design 14 either complete in itself or forming part of a single design 15 of the entire roll marking surface. In either'event, in order that the required design be properly impressed on the paper or other fibrous web, it is necessary that said sleeves be properly adjusted with relation to each other and securely retained in such adjusted relationship. his result is accomplished by providing the abutting ends of the steel sleeves 9 about the periphery thereof with cooperating slots or recesses 16 and placing small ins 17 in said slots or recesses. These smal pins, thereby effectively prevent relative'movement of said steel sleeves 9 and, hence, the marking sleeves 11.

The particular wall thickness of the marking sleeves 11 is, of course, a matter of design and expediency but satisfactory results are obtained with sleeves inch in thickness.

The ends 4 of the core 2 are cut away from the periphery of the core to a point spaced inwardly a distance therefrom to provide in each end 4 a circular notch or recess 18. The walls 19 of said recesses limit the length of the sleeve 7, layer 8, and marking surface 9. A steel collar or ring 20 is located in each recess, and lies flush with the end of said sleeve 7, layer 8, and marking surface 10. Said collars 20 are rigidly secured to the ends of core 2 and the outermost of the steel sleeves 9 by screws 21 threaded thereinto to thereby retain the steel sleeves 9 and marking sleeves 11 on the su porting core 2, and preventing shifting 0 said sleeves 9.

While I have disclosed each marking sleeve as having the same length as a retaining or supporting steel sleeve 9, it is to be understood that this is not a structural limitation, as the ratio between the length of the two sleeves may vary at'will. Similarly, it is not necessary that the entire length of the mark ing roll 2 be rovided with amarking surface for the marklng sleeves 11 may cover any portion of the roll thatis desired or expedient.

The building up and dismantling of a roll of this type, as will be appreciated from its structure, can be quickly and easily accomplished. To build up or construct the roll, it is merely necessary to slip the cushioning sleeve onto the core 2 and fasten it thereto, secure the marking sleeves or stereotypes 11 to the steel sleeves 9 and slip the combined sleeves over the cushionin sleeve 7 and fix the collars 20 in lace. T e dismantling of the roll can be e ected as easily and readily by reversing the above rocedure. It is, therefore, apparent that 1f it is desired to change the marking surface of a roll for an reason, that the same can be uickly an readily done with but little la or. Moreover, since the marking sleeves are the only part of the roll requiring replacement, it is only necessary to carry a large supply of these elements in stock.

When the roll is in operation, the layer 7 cushions the marking surface of the core 2 providing for a springy or cushioned impact of the marking surface against the paper web, thus preventin said marking surface from cutting the we It is, therefore, not necessary in this construction to wrap the marking roll with fabric as is the practice with other forms oft-stereotype marking rolls.

The marking roll above described can be used in any type of paper-making machine in conjunction with either the press or dryin rolls thereof, and may be used to impart eit er a water mark in paper or an embossed design in cardboard. Moreover, if desired, this roll may even be employed for printing a design on the paper web.

When this roll is employed to mark paper webs of relativel great wldth, it will be necessary to give the marking surface thereof a slight crown at the center thereof in order to compensate for the springing of the heavy roll over which the aper web moves while contactin the markmg roll.

It can, there ore, be appreciatedthat I have constructed a roll having great utility cured to the periphery of said shaft, detachable metallic sleeves about said layer of resilient material and of such diameter as to porting snugly fit about said la er, stereoty s seured to said sleeves, an means for etacha ly maintaining said sleeves on said shaft.

2. A marking roll comprising a supporting shaft, a layer of resilient material secured to the periphery of said shaft, metallie sleeves about said layer of resilient material and of such diameter as to snugly fit about said layer, a plurality of stereotype sleeves secured to said metallic sleeves, and means for detachably securing said metallic sleeves on said shaft.

3. A marking roll comprising a supporting shaft, a layer of resilient material sesured to the periphery of said shaft, metallic sleeves about said layer of resilient material and of such diameter as to snugly fit about said layer, stereotype sleeves secured to said metallic sleeves, means for preventing relative movement between said metallic sleeves, and means for detachably retaining said metallic sleeves on said shaft.

4. A marking roll comprising asupporting shaft, a layer of resilient material secured to the periphery of said shaft, metallic sleeves about said layer of resilient material and of such diameter as to snugly fit about said layer, a plurality of stereotype sleeves secured to said metallic sleeves, and rings secured to the ends of said shaft and the outermost of said metallic sleeves to detachably maintain said sleeves on said shaft.

5.. A watermarking roll comprising a supsh'aft, a la er of resilient material secure to the perip ery of said shaft, a plurality of metallic sleeves, about said layer of resilient material and of such diameter as to snugly fit about said layer, means for preventing relative rotation between said metallic sleeves, a plurality of stereotype sleeves secured to said metallic sleeves, and a ring secured to each end of said shaft and the I outermost of said metallic sleeves, detachably retaining said sleeves on said supporting shaft.

6. A readily renewable marking surface for water marking rolls comprising a plurality of steel sleeves having stereotype sleeves detachably secured to the outer surfaces thereof, and means between said steel sleeves to prevent relative movement therebetween.

In testimony whereof I have hereunto subscribed my name at Chicago, Cook County,

Illinois.

HERMAN G. WEBER.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3264978 *Aug 11, 1964Aug 9, 1966Philip Morris IncRotary embossing machines
US3988817 *Dec 18, 1973Nov 2, 1976Xerox CorporationPressure roll for dry fuser apparatus
US4838982 *Jun 26, 1987Jun 13, 1989H.G. Weber & Co., Inc.Patch applicator vacuum cylinder for web material
USB425770 *Dec 18, 1973Jan 28, 1975 Title not available
Classifications
U.S. Classification101/28, 492/49, 492/47
International ClassificationD21F1/00, D21F1/46
Cooperative ClassificationD21F1/46
European ClassificationD21F1/46