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Publication numberUS1884178 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 25, 1932
Filing dateJun 13, 1930
Priority dateJun 13, 1930
Publication numberUS 1884178 A, US 1884178A, US-A-1884178, US1884178 A, US1884178A
InventorsParkes William N
Original AssigneeSinger Mfg Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Sewing machine
US 1884178 A
Images(8)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Oct. 25, 1932. w. N. PARKES SEWING MACHINE 8 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed June 13. 1930 INVENTOIR.

Oct. 25, 1932.

Filed June 13. 1930 W.- N. PARKESv SEWING MACHINE INVENTOR.

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INVENTOR. mm; 2 1941 8 Sheets-Sheet 4 W. N. PARKES SEWING MACHINE Filed June 13, 1930 0d. 25, 1932. w, PARKES 1,884,178

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@N NE I YINVENTOR. huh/24A.

Oct. 25, 1932.

W. N. PARK ES SEWING MACHINE Filed June 13, 1930 8 Sheets-Sheet 7 NM HQ hum NW NR IN V EN TOR.

Oct 25, 1932.

w. N. PARKES SEWING MACHINE 8 Sheets-Sheet 8 Filed June 13. 1950 I INVENTOR.

Patented Oct. 25, 1932 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE' WILLIAM N. PARKES, OF BROOKLYN, NEW YORK, ASSIGNOR TO THE SINGER MANU- FACT'UBING COMPANY, OF NEW YORK,

N. Y., A CORPORATION OF NEW JERSEY SEWING MACHINE Application filed June 18,

This invention relates to improvements in needle-thread controlling mechanisms for lock-stitch sewing machines and is in the nature of an improvement in the needle-thread controlling mechanisms forming the subjects of my prior patent applications Serial Nos. 377,258, filed July 10, 1929, and 403,213, filed October 29, 1929.

The present invention has for its object to further ease the stitch-setting action of the thread take-up member and to insure a more complete control of the slack thread provided by said take-up member subsequently to the setting of the stitches.

To the attainment of the ends in view, the invention comprises the devices, combinations and arrangements of parts hereinafter described and particularly pointed out in the appended claims.

The features of the invention and the advantages attained thereby will be readily understood by those skilled in the art from the following detailed description of a preferred embodiment of the invention in a complete jock-stitch sewing machine containing other structural improvements devised by me.

Referring now to the Fig. 1 is a front ele and Fig. 2 is a rear el drawings ation of a portion of the machine.

Fig. 3 is a view of the face of the arm of the machine, with the face plate removed; and, with some of the partsin section.

Fig. 4 is a full sizetop plan view of the end of the arm of the machine, as indicated by the arrows Fig. 1, with part of the casting broken away.

Fig. 5 is a detached front view of the takeup'and needle bar operating parts, illustrating the relative position of these parts, when the needle bar is at the end of its downward movement; and, Fig. 6 is a diagrammatic sectional view, mainly on lines 6-6, Fig. 5, illustrating the means provided for keeping the bearings of these parts, and the bearing of the forward end 0 the driving shaft of the machine lubricated.

Fi 6a, 6b, and 6c, are views illustrating 'detai s of the said means, for keeping the ation of my machine,

1980. Serial No. 460,988.

bearings of the parts, illustrated in Fig. 6, lubricated.

Fig. 7 is a full size front view of a portion of the end of the arm of the machine, illustrating the relative osition of the needle thread, and the nee le thread control and sw tch setting parts, at about the time the pomt of the needle commences to penetrate the work, in the rocess of commencing to make a stitch; and Fig. 8 is a view of Fig. 7 looking from right to left.

Fig. 9 is a front view of a part of the said portion of the arm of the machine, illustrating the elements of Fig. 7 in the relative osition they are in, at the time the beak oi the hook commences to enter the loop of needle thread; Fig. 10 is a view of Fig. 9, looking fromright to left, with the elements of the said figure changed to the position they are in at the time the needle thread commences to pass on to the fixed combination slack thread control and stitch setting part; and, Fig. 10a is a view looking in the same direction as Fig. 10, but with the elements of the saidFig. 10, changed to the relative position they are in at the finishing of the setting of a stitch.

Fig. 11 is a bottom plan view of the machine.

Fig. 12 is a detached full size front view of the hook saddle, with the parts that it carries mounted on it, and Fig. 13 is a top plan view of Fig. 12.

Fig. 13a is a top plan view of the hook saddle, and Fig. 13?) is a top plan view of the detachable hook bearing with which the saddle is provided.

Fig. 14 is a sectional vertical view on lines 18 is a partial front end view of Fig. 13, illustrating the hook unit located above the hook saddle. in line for its entrance into its seat in the saddle.

. Fig. 19 is a view illustrating a part of the opener device, and of the means provided for lubricating the bearings, of the sand, device.

Fig. 20 is a detached top plan view of the opener arm shaft 5 and Fig. 21 is a bottom plan view of the lower end of this shaft.

Fig. 22 is a bottom plan view of the opener arm and Fig. 23 is a full size detached bottom plan view of the needle plate. In this view is also illustrated the loop of needle thread passing between the edge. of the needle hole of the plate, and the strand of bobbin thread that extends-from the bobbin case to the work..

Fig. 24 is an edge view of the needle plate, igoking in the direction of the arrows 24-24,

Fig. 25 is a top plan view of a usual form of bobbin winder, illustrating the modification made in it to adapt it to wind the special bo bin of applicants machine.

Fig. 26 is a full size top plan view of the bobbin case, with the bobbin in the case, and Fig. 27 is a sectional view on lines 2727 of Fig. 26, looking in the direction of the arrow.

Fig. 28 is a detached side view of the bobbin case, looking in the direction indicated by the arrows 28 in Fig. 26, with the tension spring attached to the case; and, Fig. 29 is the same View -of the case with the tension spring omitted.

Fig. 30 is a view of Fig. 26, looking in thev direction indicated by the arrows 30, and Fig. 31 is a bottom plan view of Fig. 30.

Fig. 32 is a perspective view of Fig. 26, illustrating details, in the construction of the bobbin case.

Fig. 33 is a diagrammatic sectional view, in connection with the bobbin case and bobbin, illustrating the relative position of the needle plate, and of the bobbin case, and how the construction of the bobbin case and of the bobbin, permits the large bobbin to be inserted in, and removed from the case, when the case is in the machine.

Fig. 34 is a top plan view of the hook base and hook; and Fig. 35 is a sectional view on lines 35-35 Fig. 34, looking in the dirgction of the arrows.

In the drawings, 1 represents the bed of the machine, and 2, and 3, the horizontal and vertical portions respectively, of the arm. 4

represents the driving shaft, that is mounted in usual bearings in the arm of the machine,

and 5 represents the hook shaft, the rear end of which is mounted in a usual bearing in the bed of the machine, which is mounted in a bearing, which is a pgrt of my improved hook saddle, that will described further on in this specification.

On the driving shaft is secured a usual pulley, not shown, on which is located the upper part of a usual belt 6, Fig. 1. The lower part of this belt is located on a pulley 7 that is secured in a usual way on the hook shaft. The ulley 7 is the same size, as the pulley not s own, therefore it willbe understood transmits, through and the forward end of that when the machine is operating, a one to one rotary movement is transmitted from the driving shaft, to the hook shaft.

On the rear end of the driving shaft is secured, a usual belt pulley 8, on which the upper Part, of a belt 9 is located. The lower part 0 the belt 9, not shown, is located on a pulley of a usual form of operating transmitter, not shown, and by this usual means,rotary movement is transmitted to the pulley 8, and thereby rotary movement is transmitted to the driving shaft 4', of the machine.

9a, see Fig. 3, represents the needle bar, the lower end of which is mounted in a usual bearing 9?), and this end of the bar is provided with a usual form of thread guide 90, and a needle 90?, through the eye 9ddof which, passes the needle thread 90. The upper end of this needle bar, and the bearing in which the said end of it is operatively located, are of special construction.

In usual bearings, located on the underside of the bed of the machine, is mounted a usual form of a feed driving shaft 10, Fig. 11, which said driving shaft is operated by a usual connection between it, and the driving shaft 4 of the machine. -To this feed driving shaft is connected, in a usual way, the end 11 of a feed bar 12. The said bar, at its other end, is

connected in a usual way, to a suitably mounted feed shaft 13; and, this shaft is operatively connected, by usual means, to the driving shaft 4; On the top of the feed bar 12, is secured in a usual way, a feed dog 14.

14a, Fig. 3, represents the presser bar, which is of a usual construction, and is mounted in usual bearings, in the arm of the machine. This bar is depressed in a usual way, by a spring, not shown, and is lifted, against the action of the said spring, by a usual pivoted presser bar lifter 14?). To the lower end of the said presser bar is secured, in a usual way, a usual form of pre'sser foot 140. To the presser bar 14a, is clamped, bya screw 14d, one end ,of a restraining arm 146,

the outer end 14 of which said arm is located in a vertical slot 14g, that is formed longitudinally in the periphery of my before mentioned special needle bar bearing.

When the machine is operating, the feed drive shaft 10 is oscillated and this movement the connection between the feed dog and th shaft, the usual feeding movement to the dogf The movement of the shaft 10, is, bymeans not shown, under ad- ]ustment, so that the extent of the movement of the said shaft may be adjusted, and thereby the length of the feeding movement of the dog, and through it By means of the said connection between the feed lift shaft 13, and the driving shaft 4 of the machine, the said shaft 13 is oscillated,

and by the usual connection between this shaft v 12, theend of the bar 1s moved, up and down, and thereby the and the end of the feed bar the length of the stitch.

for thedriving end of the hook shaft 5.

' This bearing comprises a plane,

usual vertical movement is transmitted to the feed dog.

H 0070 saddle To the underside of the bed of the machine is secured, by means of screws 15, my improved hook' saddle, which is designated by the numeral 16. The numerals 16a, and 16b represent the front and rear flanges respectively of the saddle. In the saddle is formed a horizontal bore 160, Fig. 14, that begins at the rear end of the saddle, and terminates at 17 in the body of the saddle.

In the saddle is also formed a vertical bore 18, that begins at the top of the saddleand terminates into the horizontal 14 and 18. In the top of the saddle is formed a counter bore 19, as best seen in Fig. 18. In the saddle is formed a bore 20, that begins at the top of the bottom of the counter bore 19, and terminates in the body of the saddle, as seen in Figs. 14 and 13a, and through the bottom of this bore is formed a small bore 21.

A detachable vertical hook bearing 22, Figs. 13 and 13b, is secured by means of screws 23, in the counter bore 19 of the saddle. On the underside of the said detachable bearing, a hub 24 is formed, Fig. 18, that extends downwardly into the bore 18 of the saddle, and on the top of the said detachable bearing part a short hub 25 is formed. Through the said bearing part is formed, concentric with the vertical axis of the hubs, 24 and 25, a bore 26, Fig. 13?). In the top of the said part, and around the hub 25, and concentric with it, a shallow groove 27 is formed. Through the said bearing part, a bore 28 is formed that registers with the bore 20 of the hook saddle, as seen in Figs. 13?) and 14! It will be observed that this bore breaks into the shallow groove 27, and that from the said shallow groove a groove 29, extends laterally into the bore 26.

30 represents a bearing of the hook saddle horizontally disposed body portion 31, through the center of which a bore is journalled the driving end of the hook shaft 5. A flange 33 extends in a vertical at the outer end of this bearing, and in the inner side of this flange is formed a groove 34, in which is located a felt ring '35. The body portion 31 of this bearing, is

located in the outer end of the bore 160, of

the hook saddle, and is secured therein by means of screws 36, that pass freely through bores that are formed through the said flange, and through holes that are formed'through the felt ring, into threaded seats that are formed in the hook saddle, as will be understood from Figs. 14 and 16.

In the outer end of the bearing part 30 is formed a short bore 37, that terminates at 38, in the bearing. On the-outer end of bore 160, Figs.

32. is'formed. In this bore a spaced distance from the hook shaft 5, as

illustrated in Fig. 14. The diameter of the disc 40 is slightly less than the diameter of the bore 39. Through the center of the said disc 40 a bore is formed that is of the same size as the bore 32 of the bearing part 30. In the short bore 37 is located a felt ring 43, which, in assembling the bearing parts, is put in the bore, and them-the disc is secured in its position by means of screws 44, that pass freely through bores that are formed through the disc into threaded seats that are formed in the bearing 30. The felt ring 43 is of such a size and thickness, that when the screws 44 are turned until the disc 40 is drawn home, the felt ring is pressed against the periphery of the shaft 5 suflicient- 1y to prevent any oil seeping past it, the felt ring.

45 represents a gear that is secured, in a usual way, to the forward end of the hook shaft 5. This gear is a little smaller in diame ter than the size of-the bore 160 of the hook saddle, and its axis is concentric with the axis of the hook shaft 5. The gear, as is seen in Fig. 14, is located in the oil reservoir 44a of the hook saddle. In the bore 26, of the detachable' hook bearing part 22, is journalled a sleeve 46, the lower end of which sleeve is rigidly secured on a stem 47 that projects upwardly from a small gear 48 that is one half the size of the gear 45. From this gear 48 a hub 49 extends d-'. wnwa-rdly as seen in Fig. 14. Through the stem 47 of the said gear is formed laterally a slot 50.

The numeral 51, Fig. 35,, represents the hook base and 51a represents the wall of the base and 515 the bottom of its bobbin case housing, from the underside of which extends downwardly a stem 52. This stem, when the hook is in the machine, is located in the upper end of the sleeve 46, and the end of the stem is constructed to fit the slot 50 of the stem of the gear 48 as seen in Figs. 14 and 35. Vertically through the center of the hook base and its stem 52, and through the gear 48, and the hub 49 of this gear, a bore 53 is formed. The part of this bore that is below the slot 50 is threaded, and by means of a hook attaching screw 54, which passes through the said bore 53 into the threaded part of it the hook is secured 1n its seat with the lower side of hook base 51 drawn against the top of the sleeve 46. The length of the sleeve 46 is such, that there is a running fit between it and the underside of the hook base,

I by the underside and the upper side of the gear 48, when the screw 54 is in its normal position of rigidly holding the stem of the hook ase in its seat.

On the hook base is secured, by means of screws 55, as best seen in Fig. 18, a hook ring 56, which is provided with a beak 57, the point of which is represented by the numeral 58. The lower side of the said beak terminates at 59. The numeral 60 represents the heel oft-he hook ring, 61 represents the space between the beak and the heel of the hook 1 ring, and 6:2, Fig. 35 represents an internal at the top of the hook ring, and extends from near the point of the beak around to the heel of the hook.

(In the periphery of the hook base, at its bottom, is formed a small flange 63, and when the hook ring is in its normal position on the said base, the lower edge of the hook ring is drawn againstthis flange by the screws 55. In thewall 51a of the hook base, is formed a. shallow groove 64:. When the hook ring is in its normal position on the hook base, the internal flange 62, is a spaced distance from the top of the hook base, as seen in Fig. 35, and this space serves as a groove 65, in which the bearing of my improved bobbin case is located.

Attention is called to the following novel features of the foregoing described hook saddle.

Its lubricant reservoir consists of only a single bore, that begins at the-rearend ofthe saddle and terminates in its body, the free end of the said bore is closed by the hook shaft and its bearing, a single entrance to the reservoir which begins at the top of the saddle and terminates in the reservoir, and the said entrance closed by a detachable hook bearing and hook.

Another novel feature consists of having the construction such that by the removal of only the single hook attaching screw a way is opened for putting oil into the reservoir of the saddle. Another novel feature consists of the construction being such that the lubricant may seep from the reservoir along the hook shaft beariQ until it reaches the end of the said bearing, and here its further movement away from the reservoir is prevented.

Further, in connection with novelty, at-

flange that is formed tention is called to the special disc flange,-

groove, and felt rings construction by means of which the oil is prevented from escaping from the reservoir.

Also .in connection with novelty, attention is called to the construction of the detachable hook bearing 22 of the saddle, whereof the hook base and the bearing of the sleeve 46, are kept lubricated. Finally in connection with this hook saddle I note that it is more compact, more ellicient, and less expensive to-construct than other hook saddles known to me. In connection with 'it being more compact, it will be remembered that it is illustrated in the draw ings full size, and in connection with the compactness of its construction,- I note that this is a material advantage inconnection with the use of an opener device, because, among other things, the driving parts of the said device can be more favorably located, relative to the hook.

Bobbin case and bobbin This invention relates to thebobbin case and bobbin of the vertical axis hook type of lock stitch sewing machines, and is a part of my complete machine of this type that is herein illustrated and described.

In this type of machine now in use, in which the bobbin case has a post, to get the small bobbin that is used in them in and out of the machine, the hook is located further away from the path of the needle than is necessary, and to compensate for of the hook is bent out to bring it close enough to the path of the needle to take the loop. Also in the said machines now in use ,to con trol the small bobbin, a disc of fabric is put in the case under the bobbin.

The main objects of this invention are 1, to so construct the bobbin case having a post, and the bobbin, for this type of a machine, that not only a small bobbin, but a large one as well, may be readily inserted in and removed from the machine, without locating the hook further from the path of the needle than is necessary; 2, to make the said conthis, the beak i struction such that a large bobbin as well as V a small one, will be under control without inserting a'disc or piece of fabric, or other frictional material, under the bobbin, and 3, to make the said construction such, that the effect of the action of the usual opener device and of the rotary movement of the hook on the bobbin case will be more fully utilized in connection with the control of the bobbin. Bending the beak of the hook out, which is referred to in connection with the first object, is not desirable fora number of reasons, the most serious of which is perhaps, because the use of the said beak, as a part of the bearing between the hook and the case, sacrificed. In this connection it will be re membered that in my large bobbin hook, the beak is used asa part of the said bearing, and thereby a much better bearing and bet-. ter' loop taking conditions are secured. With. reference to the second object, a. friction disc under the bobbin is not desirable, because, among other things, lint, and dust gather on .and'under it, and causes trouble; and further, because itis advisable to have the least possible friction onthe bobbin that isconsistent with its control.

With reference to the third object, it will be remembered that in the said type of machine having an opener device, that this dei from the beginning vice moves the bobbin case once to each stitch, and in some machines twice to each stitch, in an opposite direction to that in which the hook revolves, and after each of these movements, the hook frictionally moves the case back to its normal position. Thus it will be noted, the bobbin case is alternately given a positive and a frictional movement about its axis. There is a difference in speed and otherwise, between those movements, and the said third object of the invention is, to more fully utilize this difference in connection with the control of the bobbin.

The invention consists of the novel construction of the bobbin case and bobbin whereby the said insertion and removal of the bobbin is secured; and, also in its construction being such, that a better control of he bobbin is secured, and in other novel fea ures which are illustrated in the drawings, and described in the specification.

Referring now to the part ofthe drawings in which the said improved bobbin case and bobbin are illustrated, the numeral 66, Fig. 29, represents the case, 67 represents the periphery of the vertical wall of the case, 68, Fig. 83, represents the bottom of the housing for the bobbin, and 69, represents the bottom of the case. On the periphery of the wall 67 of the case, Fig. 31, and at the top of the same, is formed a retaining flange 70, in which is formed, a pocket 71, that terminates at 72 and 73 respectively. In this flange 7 0 is formed vertical bores 71a, Fig. 26, that begins at the top of the flange and terminates in the body of the flange near the bottom of it. In the periphery of the said flange 70 are formed narrow slots 71?), that terminate in the vertical bores 71a. The bores 71a serve as small lubricant wells, and the slots serve as ways for the lubricant to pass from the wells to the periphery of the flange 70, or vice versa. From the bottom of the case an auxiliary hook 72 projects as best seen in Figs. 30 and 31. The underside of this hook;

dicated by 73, to its point 74, inclines upwardly and outwardly, as seen in Fig. 31. The said hook is integral with the bobbin case, and the numeral 75 represents where the face of this auxiliary hook terminates In the center of the housing for the bobbin of the bobbin case, is located a post 76, and around the bottom of this post is formed a flange '7 7 see Fig. 27. The numeral 78 represents the free end of the post, and 79, Fig. 31 represents a bore that is formed longitudinally through the center of the post from the top of it to the bottom of the bobbin case. In the wall of the post, from the top of it to its base. are formed slots 80 and 81 respectively Fig. 27. The part of the post, between the said slots is by theslots, converted into a spring 82, and this spring at its top,

of its base, which is mis bent in a direction away from the vertical axis of the case, so as to form a Ii 83.

Extending upwardly from the ront of the bobbin case is a part designated by the numeral 85, see Figs. 28 and 29. TlllS part 85 extends from 86 to 87 of the case, as illustrated in the said figures. The end 86 of the part 85 turns outwardly and ends a short spaced distance from the edge of the flange 7 0 of the case, as best seen in Fig. 26. In the part 85 are formed a thread entrance slot 88, and a thread guide groove 89. In this part of the case is also formed a small slot 90. Where the end 86 of the part 85 commences to turn toward the periphery of the flange 70 of the case, a bore 91 is formed through the said part 85. The numerals 92 and 93 respectively are threaded holes for the bobbin thread tension spring screws.

94 represents the tension spring, on the forward end of which is formed a narrow projecting bobbin thread guide finger 95 that is bent inwardly and, on the rear end of the said spring is formed a narrow projecting osi tioning finger 96 that conforms with the s ape of the spring. The numerals 97 and 98 rep resent the tension spring screws. In attac ing the tension spring to the case the spring is inserted in place with the finger 96 of the spring located in the small groove of the case, and with the finger of the spring located in the bore 91 of the case. Then the screws 97 and 98 are inserted, the screw 98 is screwed home, and this screw, in combination with the finger 96 of the tension spring, holds the spring in place and the tension screw 97 regulates the tension of the spring on the thread. In practice the tension spring is bent, from its rearend to the tension regulating screw 97, so that the spring impinges outwardly against the head of the screw with suflicient force to insure that after the regulating screw is set to make the desired tension it will stay in that position.

99 represents a projection that is formed on the bobbin case. This part serves as a stop engaging part for the case, and also as a part for the opener device to engage. The numeral'100 represents the side of this part that the opener device engages, and the numera 101 represents the side of this part that contacts with the bobbin case stop. Any suitable bobbin case stop may be used in connection with my improved bobbin case. In the present illustration of this case I use a stop 102,

103 of which is adjustably secured, by screws 104, to the underside of the needle plate 105, as,illustrated in Fig. 23. This stop has a bobbin case contact and 106, that the side 101 of the part 99 of the bobbin case contacts with, when the bobbin case is in the hook a d the machine is operating.

The bobbin case is assembled in the hook, by placing the case on the top of the hook base, with the body of the case extending the body position downwardly into the bobbin case housing of the base, and the flange 7 O of the case resting on the top of the hook base. Then the hook ring is placed in its position on the hook base, and is secured thereon by the screws 55, the said screws then hold the hook and its base together, with the flange 70 of the bobbin case located in the groove 65 of the hook, and its base. The flange 70 is of such a thickness, relative to the groove, that when the case is assembled in the hook, the hook turns freely relative to the case, with the flange in the groove.

107, Fig. 33, represents the bobbin and 108 the body portion of the bobbin. From the top end of the body portion of the bobbin a flange 109 projects, and from the lower end of this said body portion a flange 110 projects. In the lower end of the said body portion of this bobbin a bore 111 is formed that extends to near the upper end of the said body porthe process of stitching,

tion. From the upper side of the bobbin a bore 112 is formed, that terminates into the bore 111. Around the outer edge of the bore 112, a small counter sink113 is formed.

he numeral 114 represents a usual form of Singer machine bobbin winder, that is provided with a belt contact wheel 115. In wlnding a bobbin this wheel is in engagement with the belt 9 of the machine, and this causes the said contact wheel to turn in the direction of the arrow Fig. 25. In the said Singer bobbin winder, the numeral 116 represents the end of a. spindle I have inserted, in place of the regular spindle of the winder, and this modification is all that is necessary to adapt this regular winder to wind the bobbin-for my machine.

It is thought that from Fig. 25, how this bobbin for this machine is wound by this modified winder will be understood. In this connection however, it is pointed out that the construction of the bobbin of my machine, and of the modificatibkn I have made in this Singer bobbin winde is such as to insure that the thread will be always wound runmug in the right direction, relative to bores 111 and 112 of the bobbin of my machine. be right direction referred to, is the direction which causes the bobbin to turn in the opposite direction to that ook turns, when thread is drawn from it in which is the direction lndlcated by the arrows in Figs. 13 and 26. In Fig. 33, how the construction of the bobbin case and of the bobbin, permits of a large bobbin being used, in a vertical hook bobbin case, in which there is a post, is illustrated. From 117 to 118 of the edge, at the top of the bobbin case, Fig? 26, the section 118a of the edge of the case is cut away to ermit access underthe edge of the bobbin, or the removal of it from the case. The bobbin is readily placed in the case, by turnin which the b 'er end of this shaft is ing it, from the'position it is illustrated in case, in which position the lower part of the is located on the bore 111 of the bobbin, flange 77 of the bobbin case post, and the upper part of the bore 112 is located on the periphery of the free end of said post, with thelip 83 of the spring 82 above the counter sink 113 of the bobbin.

-After the bobbin has been placed in the case, the bobbin thread 119 is, by a single movement of the hand, drawn into the'entrance slot 88, and under the tension spring to the thread guide groove 89. When the machine is operating the bobbin thread passes from'the guide groove 89 along a path under the tension spun and emerges just above the bobbin thread guide finger 95. In connection with the said guide finger, it is noted that by it, and its location relative to the needle hole of the needle plate, the bobbin thread is prevented from shifting downwardly under the tension spring, or, in other words, the bobbin thread is caused to remain in its predetermined path under the tension spring, and change in the tension on the bobbin thread by the said shifting of it is thereby prevented. The holding of the section, of the bobbin thread, that extends from the bobbin case to the work, in its normal position is also a help in guiding the loop of needle thread from the case to the work.

To remove the bobbin from the case it is tilted to about the position it is illustrated in in Fig. 33 and then it is just picked out of the case. It will be seen that there is plenty of room between the top of the bobbin, and the underside of the part of the needle plate that extends over a sect-ion of the bobbin, for the bobbin to be moved vertically upwardly until the bore 112 of the bobbin, is above the free end of the bobbin post, at which point it, the bobbin, is free to be removed from. the case in the manner indicated in the said Fig. 33.

Opener device This invention is an opener device that I ave developed for my machine. It comprises improved means for engaging the bobbin case, to provide a free path for the passage of the loop of needle thread around the case; and the said means so constructed as to also provide improved means for lubricating the bearings of the driving and driven parts of the said device.

In a bore that is formed through the flange 16b of the hook saddle, is secured, by means of a screw 120, a tubular bearing 121, see Fig. 15. In this bearing is mounted the opener arm shaft 122, acrossthe upper end of which is formed a slot 123, Fig. 20; and on the lowformed a flange 124,

On the said flange is formeda flat 125, which is the full width of the flange, and on the flange directly opposite the flat 125, is formed a flat 126, which is less than the full width of the flange. The position of the flange above the flat 126, serves as a lip 127. A bore 128 is formed laterally through the flange 124, which bore extends through the flange, from the flat 125 to the flat 126. The said bore is so located that the top of it is parallel with the underside of the lip 121 of the flange, as will be understood from the said Fig. 21.

Through the center of the shaft 122, is formed a bore 129, that begins at the top of the shaft, and terminates at 130, into a small bore 131, which small bore in turn, terminates into the transverse bore 128 of the flange 124. Around the periphery of theshaft 122, is formed a narrow groove 132, as seen in Fig. 15. When the parts of this opener device are assembled, the. end of a screw 132a, Fig. 17, is located in the said groove 132. The length of the said screw is such, that when it is home, the opener shaft is free to oscillate.

The numeral 133 represents the opener arm, in the top of the base of which is forme an oil cup 134, Fig. 15; and, the numeral 133a represents the bobbin case engaging end of the said opener arm. .Through the bottom of this cup is formed a bore, 135', and across the underside of the cup, a flange 136 is formed, and this flange is bisected by the bore 135, as seen in Fig. 22. The upper end of the bore 129 is threaded and the opener arm is secured to the top of the shaft 122 by a screw 137 that passes through the bore 135 of the opener arin into the said threaded end of the bore 129; and, when the opener arm is secured to the top of this shaft, the flange 136 of the arm, is located in the slot 123 o the end of the said opener arm shaft. Longitudinally through the center of the screw 137, a bore 138 is formed.

The numeral 139 represents an eccentric, on which is formed a hub 140. This eccentric is mounted in a usual way on the hook shaft 5, next to the hook saddle and is held rigidly in position on this-shaft hymeans of screws 141, that are located in threaded seats that are formed through the hub 140, of the eccentric. On the outer edge of the periphery see Fig. 21.

of the eccentric,and concentric with its center, v

is formed a flange 142, and on the inner side of the eccentric is secured by screws, not shown, a disc 143, the diameter same as the diameter of the flange.

On the periphery of the eccentric, intermediate the flange 142 and the disc 143, is mounted a ring 144, on the periphery ofthis ring two flat places 145 and 146 are formed, see Fig. 19. These flat one on each side of the ring the axis of it. Through the flat 145 is forme a bore 147, and throughthe flat 146 is forme and inhne with of which is the places are disposed d and inthe-end of d threaded body of a bore 148. A yoke 149 is provided with arms 150 and 151. In the arm 150, near its end, is formed a threaded bore in which the threaded body of a screw 152 is located, and this screw has a bearing end 153 that is located in and operatively fits the bore 147 of the arm 150. In the arm 151, near its end, 1s formed a threaded bore, in which the threaded body of a screw 154 is located, and this screw has a bearing end 155, that is located in and operatively fits the bore 156 of the arm 151.

The screws 152 and 154 are each of sucha length, that when they are securely screwed home, their heads contact respectively with the arms of the yoke, and thereby'the screws are locked in their seats, and when in this position their hearing ends are located fully into their-respective bores in the ring 144.

Through the center of the body of the yoke 149, is formed a bore 157, in which is located ,a wick 158, the inner end of which wick periphery of the eccentric 139. Later'ally.

through the free end of this yoke, is formed d an opening 160, in which a ball 161 is located. The said ball is formed on the end of a lever arm 162; and, in the ball is formed a bore 162a, that, extends from its periphery to its centeras illustrated in Fig. 19. The outer end of the bore 157 that passes from the end of the opening 160, is threaded, and this threaded end of the said bore serves as a seat in which the body of the screw 163 is located. In the end of the screw 163 is formed a cup 164, that operatively fits the periphery of the ball 161. This cup serves as a socket bearing and the end 165, of the part of the bore 157,

i that enters' the lateral'opening 1 60, serves as a socket bearing for the opposlte side of the ball.

The body of the screw 163 is of such a length, that when itis screwed securely home, the head of the screw contacts with the end 166 of the yoke 149, and thereby the screw is locked in its seat; and, when it is in this position the ball operatively fits its socket.

I havespecified that the ball 161 is formed on the end of the said arm 162. On the periphery of this arm, a spaced distance from the said end 167, a flange 168 is formed. The numeral 169 represents the section of the arm from the said flange to its end 167 and this section islocated in the er arm shaft 122, see the end of the section Figs. 15 and 21. In 169 of this arm is axis of the arm 162. From the bore 170 of the arm to the center of the ball 161, a small bore 171 is formed, in the center of the arm 162.. The free end of the bore 170 is threaded,- this threaded part the for one side of the ball,

a screw 172 is located. I

bore 128 of the open-' sembled, the opener arm 133 is On the top of the flange 168 a fiat 173 is, formed, see Fig. 17.

The part 169 of the lever arm 162, is slightly less in length than the bore 128 in which it is located, so it will be understood that when the screw 172 is in its normal position, the screw draws the flange 168, of the said lever arm rigidly against the fiat 126, of the flange 124 of the opener arm shaft. And when in this position the flat 173, is located under the lip a bore 174, that begins in the periphery of the top of the arm, and terminates into the bore 170 of the lever arm 162.

Through the bottom of the oil cup 1341, is formed a small bore 17 5, that is located "over one end of the slot 123, that is formed across the top of the opener arm shaft 122.

- The length of the cylindrical bearing 121, and of the opener arm shaft 122, is such that there is an operative fit, between the underside of the base of the opener arm, and the top of the cylindrical bearing 121, and the top of the flange 1241 of the opener arm, and the lower end of the said cylindrical bearing.

1' have now specified the mechanism of my improved opener device. it will be understood that when this mechanism is asin position for its end 133a to engage the side 100, of the projection 99a of the bobbin case. It will also be understood that the construction of the flange 168, on the lever arm 162, so that it has a flat that just fits under the lip 127 of the flange 12d, insures that when the arm is assembled in the machine, its bore 174 will register with the small vertical bore 131 of the opener arm shalt.

Another special feature of this device to be noted is, that an oil way is provided in it, whereby oil will flow from the said oil cup 134, to the periphery of the eccentric 139, and that this oil way is so constructed that all of the bearings of its parts are lubricated by oilthat flows from a single source, namely the oil cup 134. In connection with this it will be observed that the hearing between the underside of the base of the opener arm, and the top of the cylindrical bearing 121, is lubricated byoil that flows from the cup through the small bore 175, and that 'rom this source the bearing of the opener arm shaft 122 is also lubricated.

Another feature to be observed is the corn nection between the eccentric, and the opener arm shaft, here it is seen that the construction is such that the ball end of the yoke 149 is free to move in any direction. It will also be observed that by unscrewing the screw 137, Fig. 15, a little, the opener arm may be lifted to disengage its flange 136, from the slot 123 of the opener arm shaft, and then the said arin may be turned from above. the hook. And it will be observed that when the said arm is removed from above the hook as chine, it will be noted that it 127. In the arm 162 is formed I screw 200. the head l of,which stated, or when it is removed entirely from the top of the opener arm shaft, the screw 132a will prevent the said shaft from dropping down in its bearing. 1

Needle thread control and stitch setting device While I have developed this needle thread control and stitch setting device for my mais equally well adapted for use in other vertical axis hook machines, or in the well known horizontal axis hook machine. It is to this invention, that my present application is specifically directed, as before stated.

Referring now to the part of the drawings that illustrate my saidthread control and stitch setting device:-'175a, Fig. 0, rep resents the needle bar crank, that issecured, in a usual way, on the forward end ot the driving shaft 1 of the machine. In this crank, is secured, byscrevvs 176, only one of which is shown, a crank pin 177. In the said pin is formed, central of its longitudinal axis, a bore 178, that begins at the rear end of the pin and terminates at 179 in the body of it and from this point a small bore 180 passes to the end 181 of the pin, the inner end of the said bore 178 being closed by a screw 182.

The crank pin 177, from the crank 17 5a to the part 183 of the pin, is reduced in size, and

on this reduced part, is mounted the crank pin sleeve 1841, of a take-up lever 185; and, the said take-up lever at its free end is provided with an eye 18562. The said sleeve extends from the needle bar crank to the end of the reduced part of the pin. The pin from its reduced part 183 to its end is further reduced, and this second reduced part of it is threaded, as seen in the said Fig. 6, and on this threaded part of the pin is located a nut 186, that serves to hold the sleeve of the take-up lever operatively on the pin.

187 represents a pivot pin with which the take-up lever is provided; horizontally from the take-up lever, to the end 188 of the pin, and in the pin, from the said end to the take-up lever, a weight reducing bore 189 is formed. in suitable bearings in the arm of the machine a take-lip lever link bearing 190 is secured, by means of a screw 191, that engages a flat 192 Fig. 4, that is formed on the pin. The outer section of this pin 193 is reduced in size, from 194 to 195, and on this reduced section of the pin, a sleeve portion 196, or the upper end of a takeup pivot link 197, is pivoted. In the bearing pm 190, is formed a bore 198, that begins in the free end" of the pin, and terminates at 199 in the body of the pin, near its inner end. The outer end of the bore 198 is threaded, and in this end is. located the body of a abuts the reduced end of the pin I90, and thereby retains the sleeve 196, of the link 197, operathis pin extends tively on-the reduced section 193 of the pin. On the lower end of the link 197 is formed a sleeve 202, in which is pivoted the pivot pin 187, of the take-up lever. The outer end of the bore 189 of the said pivot pin is threaded, and in this threaded end of the said bore is located the body of a screw 203. The head of this screw abuts the end of the sleeve 202, of the pivot link 197 and thereby the ivot pin 187 of the take-up lever, is retaine operartively in the sleeve 202 of the pivot l1nk 19 204 represents the needle bar link, on the upper end of which is formed a sleeve 205, which said sleeve is mounted on the peri hery of the crank pin sleeve 184, of the ta e-up lever, as illustrated in Fig. 6. On the lower end of the said connectinglink is formed a sleeve 206, in which is located the body 207, of a usual needle bar connecting stud, that at its outer end is, in a usual way, connected to the needle bar 9a, by means of apinch screw 208.

The foregoing are the moving parts of my needle thread control and stitch setting device. I will now specify my improved tension device after which the fixetfi 1 pdarts of my said control device will be speci Needle thread tension device This invention comprises improvements as a tension device per se and it is also an element in some of the special features of the invention to which this applicationvis directed, as will be found specifically set forth in'some of the claims; It is a preferred form of a needle thread tension device, for

my said complete machine.

This tension device has a number of advan- ,tages, in addition to the advantage it has an element 'of some of the features of my present invention. For example, a little thread retainer device is used i connection with the usual tension device; no retainer device is required orused in connection with this improven tension device; the construction of this device is such that it performs the functions that the said little retainer device performed, and, at the same time performs the functions of a tension device better than other tension devices known to applicant 209, represents a boss that extends horizontally from the arm of the machine, as illustrated in Fig. 3. On a reduced end 210 of this boss, which lines, is mounted the inner end of a ring 211, that is secured on the said reduced end of the boss, by a screw 212, Fig. 7. This screw passes through an adjustable slot, not shown, that is formed through the ring, into a threaded seat, not shown, that is formed in the said boss. The ring, from the full line .213 Fig. 3, extends outwardly beyond the end of the said reduced portion of the boss, and

end is indicated by dotted thereby a housing is formed for the tension device.

Through the center of the boss 209, is

formed a short bore, not shown, in which is secured, by means of a screw, not shown, a tension stud 214. On this stud, next to the reduced end of the said boss, are located tension discs 215, and 216 respectively; and on the stud next to the disc 216, is located a tens on spring 217. The outer end of the stud is threaded, and on this end is located a tension regulating nut 218, that is in engagement with the tension spring. In the end of the ring211, is formed a tension thread entrance slot 219 that is disposed centrally of the tension discs, as will be understood from Fig. 3.

The ends 220 and 220a of the said slot, are located in a horizontal plane, a little above the horizontal axis of the tension stud 214. Through the stud214 is formed a threadway, not shown, that is so constructed and so located relative to the tension discs, that when the needle thread is pulled into the said way, it is retained therein by the outer tension disc 216. It is the location of this tension device relative to the take-up lever, and the field of action of the said lever, and the fact that it, the tension device, functions in connection with the control of the needle thread and the setting of the stitch, that makes it, a combination part of my needle thread control and stitch setting device.

To the front side of the end of the arm of the machine, is secured, by screws 221, a detachable take-up guard plate, 222, that is disposed in a vertical plane, as best seen in Figs. 3, 7 and 8.5 This plate is provided with a cam action edge part 223, that begins at 223a, and runs upwardly at an angle towards the arm of the machine, to a point represented by 224. From 224 of the plate a vertical slot 225 extensd upwardly, as best seen in Fig. 10.

To the top part of the said plate is secured, by means of a nut 226, a combination thread control and stitch setting part 227. 228 represents the base of thispart 227, and this base extends and tapers from the said plate to the part of the base re resented by 229 as seen in Figs. 4 and 9. rom 229 the said control part extends downwardly at an angle slightly in a direction away from the plate, and also in a direction towards the front of the machine to the point indicated by 230; and, here the said part commences to run in a direction. slightly towards the back of the machine until the point 231 is reached; and, from here it runs, at an obtuse angle, to its end 232. The said end of this part is located in a bore 233 that it fits, and that is formed in the arm of the machine. It will be observed that the said control part is tapered from its base to its end, as well as from the guard plate to the end of the base. From this it is desired that it be understood that in the manufacture of the said part it is at first constructed straight, and the said taper shape is continuous from the be inning of its base to its end, and then, a ter it is made in this form straight, it is bent to the form illustrated in the drawings.

In the arm of the machine is formed a counter bore 234, in which is secured, by a screw 235, the base 236, of an auxiliary slack thread control part 237. This control part extends from its base, to the slack thread discharge end of it, 238, at an angle towards the path of the thread carrying eye 185a of the take-up, see Fig. 4. 238a, represents the thread engaging edge of the said auxiliary part 237 that runs from the thread discharge end 238 of it, at an angle upwardly to the short thread landing part of this edge at the top of the base of the art. The said thread landing part of this edge begins at 2386, and terminates at 2380, as best seen in Figs. 7 and 9. I

In the arm of the machine is secured, by a screw 239, Fig. 7, the base 240, of a thread guide, which has a thread engaging part 241 Fig. 10, that extends horizontall from the said base, to a point indicated y the numeral 242, and from this point the said guide extends upwardly, see Fig. 3. It will be observed that this guide is so located, that its thread engaging part 241, is disposed in a horizontal plane, to the left of the part 223 of the take-up guard plate 222. And it will alsobe observed that the end 238, of the auxiliary slack thread control part 237, is located in a vertical plane, which said plane is near the path of the thread carrying end of the take-up lever.

The dot and dash line 242a on the side of the take-up guard plate in Figs. 8 to 10 inelusive, represents the path of the thread carrying eye of the end of the take-up lever. The foregoing fixed parts, that function in connection with the control of the thread, may be made adjustable if desired. For example, the part 227 may be locked in any position around the axis of its base, by the nut 226, and in place of the bore 233, a slot may be formed which will permit of the adjustment of the 'part on the axis of its base. And the location of the adjustable, horizontally for example, by

making a,hor izontally disposed slot in the guard plate, in place of the bore, in which the said part 227 is locked. And by making vertical slots in the guard plate, in place of the bores, for the screws 221, the guard plate may be made adjustable, and thereby an adjustment in any direction vertically, may be had for the part 227, and separate adjustments, for the plate and the part. Also by usual means the part 237, may be made adjustable, but, as ad ustments of these parts are not necessary in a machine for general stitching, I have not illustrated the adjustpart may be made,

ments that may be made in them for special purposes.

As to the operation of the foregoing described needle thread control and stitch setting device, as has been seen, from the description and the drawings, applicant has provided a specially constructed take-up device, the take-up lever of which has a movement, whereby it draws the needle thread into engagement with specially constructed fixed parts, in such a way, that the needle thread is controlled, the thread for the loop is given and taken up, and the stitch is set, by the movement of the take-up lever, without the use of a spring, and without the use pf any moving part other than the take-up ever.

In Figs. 7 and 8 are illustrated the relative positions of the control parts of the said device and of the thread, at about the time the needle has reached the work, in the process of commencing to make a stitch. Here it is seen the needle thread is on the upper end or base of the control and stitch setting part 227. In this connection I note that the needle thread is in engagement with the upper end of the said control part, quite a little time previous to the finishing of the setting of the stitch, and in Fig. 10a the position the needle thread is in, at about the time of the finishing of the setting of the stitch, is illustrated.

At the finishing of a stitch, the tautness of the thread ends, but, by reason of the cam action part 225 of the take-up guard plate, and the part 241 of the thread guide 240 and the relative position of these parts and the movement of the thread carrying end of the take-up, the needle thread is caused to remain on'the upper part of the control part 227, until the needle has commenced to penetrate the work. At this time, it should be understood however, that it is only held loosely on the said part, after the finishing of a stitch;

and, in this connection it should be remembered that the stitch is finished before the needle reaches the work in the doing of any kind of work, so there is no adjustment necessary in connection with this control device.

he foregoing illustrates how the excessive thread, that the take-up gives after setting the stitch, is taken care of up to the time the needle has commenced to enter the work. After the parts have reached the relative position illustrated in the said Figs. 7 and 8 in the further movement of needle thread is moved, by. the take-up, from the control part227, onto the control part 237 and it remains on this part until after the beak of the hook has entered the loop of needle thread, and in Fig. 9, the relative positions of the machine the the said parts and of the thread, are illustrated. From this it will be understood that,

through the movement of the take-up in combination with the control part 237, and the I thread guide 240, the lower end of the con-" trol part 227, and the cam part 223, of the take-up plate, the excessive thread given by the take-up, from the time the needle enters the work until the beak of the hook has entered the loop of needle thread, is taken care of, and after this, until the setting of the stitch, there is practically no slack thread to take care of, and what there is the hook takes care of.

In Fig. 10, the passing of the needle thread onto the control part 227 is illustrated. Here it will be seen how the cam action part 223 of the take-u-pguard plate, helps in combination with other parts of the device, to cause the take-up to draw the needle thread on to the control part 227, of the said take-up guard plate, and thereafter helps in causing the needle thread to pass to the cam action part 225 of the said plate before the beginning oi. the setting of the stitch. Further in connection with the operation of the machine, it is noted that at the time the take-up lever draws the thread into engagement with the cam action part 223, and the part 227; the hook has carried the loop to the cast off side of the hook, where it is free to be drawn up rapidly. From the time the said engagement begins, until the thread has reached the slot 225, the engagement of the thread with the said cam action part, and with the part 227, accelerates the take-up functioning action of the take-up lever. The construction and timing of the said parts are such, that the thread reaches the said slot, just after the loop has been drawn up to the point where the bobbin thread passes the lower edge of the needle plate hole, and this is previous to the beginning of the setting of the stitch.

The advantages of the construction, so as to bring about the functioning noted in the preceding paragraph, are, a more favorable timing without the danger of the hook in its second or idle rotation, catching the loop, and also to take care of the loop as it is cast off by the hook.

243 is a usual thread guide, that is secured in a usual way to the top of the arm of the machine. Through the horizontally disposed part of this guide, a vertical 4 bore 244 is formed, and through the end of the said guide a horizontally dlsposed bore 245 is formed. lubwicator for the needle bar bearings I have developed improved means for lubricating the bearings of the needle bar in my said machine, comprising a reservoir for retaining oil for lubricating the bearings of the needle bar, which latter is provided with means for drawing the oil from the said reservoir as it is needed. The means referred to comprises a pin that projects from the top of the needle bar, and the said reservoir so constructed and located, that each time the needle bar passes to its highest position, the said pin penetrates into the reservoir, which said reservoir is filled with oil, and with an oil absorbent material. The operation of this device is such, that only the slight supply of oil that is required, is drawn for the bearings, and when the machine is not operating no oil passes from the reservoir.

Referring now to the part of the drawings that illustrate this device-in a usualvertical bore, that is formed through the top of the housing for the needle bar operating parts of the machine, is secured, by means of a screw 246, a hearing 247, in the lower section of which is formed, longitudinally of the bearing, a bore 248, that begins at the lower end of the bearing and ends at 249 in the body of the bearing. Beginning at the top of the bearing, a bore 250 is formed that terminates at 251 in the body of the bearing.

The bore 250 is connected with the bore 248, by a small bore 252, that extends centrally of the axis of the bearing from the bore 250 into the bore 248. In the top of the needle bar is secured a pin 253, that projects upwardly as illustrated in Fig. 3. This pin registers with the small bore 252, and when the machine is operating it passes through the said small bore, into the bore 250, each time the needle bar passes to its highest position.

Over the upper end of the bearing 247 is secured, by means of screws 254, a cap 255, as illustrated in Fig. 3. In the top of this cap is formed an oil cup 256, through the bottom of which is formed a small bore 257. The top of the bore 250 is covered with a screen 258, that is of such a size, that when the cap is full drawn down by the screws 254, is pressed, y the underside of the cap on the top of the said bearing part 247, all around the lubricant reservoir bore 250.

In practice the said lubricant reservoir is filled with oil absorbent material, and then all the oil that the reservoir will hold is put into it. After this it is only necessary to put oil in it occasionally, or as the oil is used so that none of it is left in the oil cup.

Lubm'cator for the pivot of the take-up lever It is important, in connection with the take-up device of a sewing machine, that its bearings should be kept oiled, and this is especially important in a high speed machine such as I have developed. I have provided improved means for keeping the bearings of the take-up device oiled, and T will now describe this part of the said means after which I will describe the means for keeping all of the balance of the operating and driving part of it oiled.

Referred now to the part of the drawings that illustrate'this invention: in the top of the take-up pivot link bearing pin 190, is formed vertically a threaded bore 259, and in this bore is located the threaded end 260, of an oil cup 261. Through the bottom of this cup is formed vertically, a small bore'262,

that passes from the .oil cup into the bore 198,'of the bearing pin 190. Longitudinally through the said link 197, is formed a bore 263, that passes from the inner Wall of the sleeve 196 of the said link, to the interior of the sleeve 202 of the link. In the top of the said take-up lever link bearing two small bores 264 and 265 are formed, that pass from the periphery of the pin to the bore 198 that is formed in it. In the said pin 190, a small bore 266 is formed that passes from the periphery of the pin into the bore 198 of the pin. This bore 266 is so located, that in the operation of the machine it registers once to each stitch, with the upper end of the bore 263 of the pivot link 197.

A special feature to be noted, in connection with the foregoing described lubricating device, is, that oil put in the oil cup 261, can only escape by passing to the bearing of the pivot of the take up lever, which is the bearing that the device is especially designed to keep lubricated, and as this is a closed bearing, very little oil escapes from it. Another feature of this device to be noted is, that so long as there is any oil in the lubricant reservoir 198, or in the oil distributing way be tween the said reservoir, and the pivot of the take-up lever, the oil, when the machine is operating, will fiow to the said bearing of the pivot of the take-up lever. Another feature to be noted is, that when the machine is not operating, very little, if any, oil escapes from the reservoir, or its oil distributing connection.

Lubricator for the bearings of the needle bar end, and for the parts operated by the said end, of the driving shaft I have developed improved means for'lubricating the bearings of the needle bar end, of the driving shaft of my machine, and the bearing of the parts'that are mounted on the crank pin of this end of the said shaft.

The said improved means that are new to applicant, consist principally of improving the means now in use, so'that the flow of the oil from the lubricating reservoir, may be regulated; and, so the oil in the reservoir may be seen, inorder to determine when it is advisable to add to the supply. Another feature to be noted is an improvement in the distributing of the means now in use whereby a way is formed longitudinally through the center of the needle bar connecting link, through which the oil may passto the bearing of the lower end of the said link.

Referring now to the part of the drawings in which this invention is illustrated, see Fig. 6, 267 represents the bearing for the forward end of the driving shaft of the machine, which said bearing is secured in the arm of the machine in a usual way'., Inthis bearing a bore 268 is formed, in which the said end of thedriving shaft is journalled. In

the shaft is formed a longitudinal bore 269, the outer end of which bore begins at the end of the shaft, and is closed by a screw 270; and, the inner end of which bore, not shown, terminates in the body of the shaft. In the shaft is formed a transverse bore 271, that passes from the periphery of the shaft into the longitudinal bore 269 of the shaft.

272 represents a verticalbore that is formed in the top of the arm of the machine, and 273 is a vertical bore that is formed in the driving shaft bearing 267. The bore 273 registers with the bore 272,.and the lower end of this bore terminates at 274 in the bearing, a short spaced distance above the driving shaft 4 of the machine. The location of the said vertical bore is such, relative to the bore 271 of the driving shaft, that each time the shaft revolves its bore 271, registers in line with the vertical axis of the said vertical bores. In line with the axis of the said vertical bores is formed, through the bottom 275 of the bore 273, a bore 276, see Fig. 60, which is of the same size as the bore 271 of the driving shaft, and is so located that each time the shaft revolves its bore 271, registers in line with the verticaraxis ofthe bore 276. In the bottom of the bore 273, is formed, Fig. 6a, a slot 277, that is in alignment with the axis of the driving shaft 4 of'the machine, and passes through the bottom of the bore 273, into the bore in which the said shaft is journalled. 7

In the bottom of the bore 273 is located a screen 278, that consists of a perforated disc of the same size as the bore. On the top of the said disc, is located a cylinder of oil absorbent material 279. 280 is an oil cup, on which is formed a reduced end 281, that is located in a threaded seat, that is formed in the top of the bore 272. Through the bottom of this cup are formed five small holes 282, see Fig. 6a, and in the oil container part of the cup is located a disc 283 ofaoil absorbent material. The said cylinder of oil absorbent material 279, is of such a length that the bottom of the oil .cup 280 contacts with it, and presses it, as the cup is screwed into its seat.

In the said driving shaft 4, is formed a bore 284, that passes from the periphery of the shaft into the longitudinal bore 269 of the shaft. In the needle bar crank 175 is formed a bore 285, that registers witli the bore 284 of the said driving shaft. In the crank pin 177, a bore 286 is formed, that passes from'the p'eriphery of the pin, into the bore 178 that is formed inthe pin and this bore 286, registers with the bore 285 of the said crank; Through the said pin 177, from its periphery'to the bore riphery of the reduced portion of the crank

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4638750 *Oct 23, 1985Jan 27, 1987Maruzen Sewing Machine Co., Ltd.Sewing machine loop taker attaching construction
US4660487 *Oct 16, 1985Apr 28, 1987Maruzen Sewing Machine Co., Ltd.Loop taker for sewing machines
US6814176Sep 6, 2002Nov 9, 2004Bayerische Motoren Werke AktiengesellschaftDifferential case for motor vehicles
Classifications
U.S. Classification112/249, 112/256, 112/184
International ClassificationD05B51/00
Cooperative ClassificationD05B51/00
European ClassificationD05B51/00